“The Ministry of Love was the really frightening one.”

“The Ministry of Truth — Minitrue, in Newspeak — was startlingly different from any other object in sight. It was an enormous pyramidal structure of glittering white concrete, soaring up, terrace after terrace, 300 metres into the air. From where Winston stood it was just possible to read, picked out on its white face in elegant lettering, the three slogans of the Party:

WAR IS PEACE

FREEDOM IS SLAVERY

IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH

The Ministry of Truth contained, it was said, three thousand rooms above ground level, and corresponding ramifications below. Scattered about London there were just three other buildings of similar appearance and size. So completely did they dwarf the surrounding architecture that from the roof of Victory Mansions you could see all four of them simultaneously. They were the homes of the four Ministries between which the entire apparatus of government was divided. The Ministry of Truth, which concerned itself with news, entertainment, education, and the fine arts. The Ministry of Peace, which concerned itself with war. The Ministry of Love, which maintained law and order. And the Ministry of Plenty, which was responsible for economic affairs. Their names, in Newspeak: Minitrue, Minipax, Miniluv, and Miniplenty.

The Ministry of Love was the really frightening one. There were no windows in it at all. Winston had never been inside the Ministry of Love, nor within half a kilometre of it. It was a place impossible to enter except on official business, and then only by penetrating through a maze of barbed-wire entanglements, steel doors, and hidden machine-gun nests. Even the streets leading up to its outer barriers were roamed by gorilla-faced guards in black uniforms, armed with jointed truncheons.”

George Orwell from “1984”, 1949

 

 

It’s October, 2018, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime.

There’s a worldwide news blackout in place on the subject.

I’ve appended a current news story below to support my assertion. It’s headlined “Is Iowa’s corn yield average really a record?

As you can see, they’re hedging and obfuscating as hard as they can, from the get-go…not that such tactics will do them any good in the long run.

To rebut the basic message of the story, which outlines the best harvests ever in the history of the world in Iowa, we read that “Many farmers are skeptical, as they believe the government’s numbers for estimated yield and crop size are too high, considering the wetter-than-normal weather and rain-delayed harvest across Iowa this fall.

Many farmers.” Where “many” and “farmers” are both general. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. Who are those many farmers? Why aren’t any quoted in the article? That’s hearsay. That’s propaganda.

The words “mystery“, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments want to lie about, well, basically anything. One of those variants is “surprised“.

That’s why the article we’re discussing reads: “USDA’s October Crop Production Report issued Oct. 11 brought some surprises on the estimated size of this fall’s corn and soybean harvests in Iowa.”

The story continues: “Greg Thessen, director of USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service office in Des Moines…says it’s understandable why farmers may be skeptical of these latest official estimates. They will be updated with the November survey.”

The Illuminist-shill talking head quoted in the newspaper article repeats the meme with “farmers may be skeptical.” That’s general. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. Who are those farmers? Why aren’t any quoted in the article? That’s hearsay. That’s propaganda.

A paragraph heading within the story reads “Iowa soybeans forecast record-large

Can you see how that’s a Satanic inversion? The correct, most-impactful headline would read “Record-large Iowa soybean harvest”. The way they’ve written it is, bizarrely, the soybeans that are inferred to be large in size – versus the harvest as a whole being a record, as is the case. They’re stupefying the reader, literally boggling their mind, or at least side-tracking them.

The story continues: “Production of alfalfa and alfalfa mixtures for hay is forecast at 3.15 million tons for 2018, an increase of 25% from the previous year.

A see-the-needle-moving 25% increase, in one year, to the highest level in history, is a sea change. It’s epochal.

To describe that increase, the paragraph head reads “Iowa alfalfa hay production up.” Vs. the correct, honest sentence, “Up by 25% to the highest level in history.”

Only a furious cloud of disinformation and spin such as this has kept most people’s eyes off the phenomenon, and I’m making it my business to publicize it more widely, here on this Obscure Internet Blogsite.

I figure that many people only need to be told something once, and that no one’s ever told them, previously.

So I’m telling them.

 

 

October 16, 2018 – Is Iowa’s corn yield average really a record?

USDA’s latest estimate says Iowa is harvesting a record statewide corn yield this fall.

USDA’s October Crop Production Report issued Oct. 11 brought some surprises on the estimated size of this fall’s corn and soybean harvests in Iowa. Many farmers are skeptical, as they believe the government’s numbers for estimated yield and crop size are too high, considering the wetter-than-normal weather and rain-delayed harvest across Iowa this fall.

“The October estimate for both corn and soybeans is based on crop conditions on or around Oct. 1,” says Greg Thessen, director of USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service office in Des Moines. “And we’ve had continued rain across much of the state since the beginning of October, keeping combines out of the fields for the most parts.”

(Implying it impacted the largest harvest in Iowa history, which it did not – ed)

He says it’s understandable why farmers may be skeptical of these latest official estimates. They will be updated with the November survey.

Iowa corn crop big again

Iowa corn production is now forecast at 2.60 billion bushels for 2018, close to the 2.61 billion bushels the state produced in 2017. Iowa’s record corn crop was produced in 2016, at just over 2.7 billion bushels.

Iowa is expected to average 204 bushels per acre this year based on the October estimate, down 2 bushels per acre from USDA’s Sept. 1 forecast, but up 2 bushels per acre from last year. If realized, this will be the highest statewide average yield on record for Iowa, 1 bushel per acre above the record set in 2016.

(The positive change just happened, and is increasing in speed and magnitude, now. – ed)

Corn planted acreage is estimated at 13.2 million acres in 2018. An estimated 12.8 million of the acres planted will be harvested for grain.

Iowa soybeans forecast record-large

Soybean production is forecast by USDA at 606 million bushels for Iowa this fall. If realized, this will be the highest production on record with 39.8 million bushels more than the previous record of 567 million bushels set in 2017. The average yield for Iowa is forecast at 61 bushels per acre, up 1 bushel per acre from USDA’s September forecast, and 4 bushels per acre higher than the state average in 2017.

(Huge increase in yield, the great resurgence of the life force – ed)

If realized, this 61 bushels per acre will be the highest statewide yield average on record for Iowa, surpassing the 60 bushels per acre in 2016. Soybean planted acreage in Iowa in 2018 is estimated at 10 million acres with 9.94 million acres to be harvested.

Iowa alfalfa hay production up

Production of alfalfa and alfalfa mixtures for hay is forecast at 3.15 million tons for 2018, an increase of 25% from the previous year. Yield is expected to average 3.80 tons per acre, up 0.30 ton from last year. Production of other hay is forecast at 888,000 tons, up 7% from last year. Yield for other hay is expected to average 2.40 tons per acre, up 0.10 ton from last year.

“The forecasts in this report are based on Oct. 1 conditions and do not reflect weather effects since that time,” Thessen says. “The next USDA corn and soybean production forecasts, based on conditions as of Nov. 1, will be released on Nov. 8.”

USDA has an update in this October report. Following a thorough review of all data, the 2017 soybean yield and production have been revised for Iowa. The 2017 yield, at 57.0 bushels per acre, is up 0.5 bushels from the previous estimate. Production for 2017 has been revised to 567 million bushels, up 4.97 million bushels from the previous estimate. Updated 2017 district and county estimates will be available in February 2019.

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