“Everybody’s got a plan until they get hit in the face.”

“Everybody’s got a plan until they get hit in the face.”

Mike Tyson

 

 

 

 

 

December 17, 2017 – Teen Depression, Suicide Linked To Time Spent On Phones, Social Media

2018 – Among 12 to 34 year-olds, Facebook usage declined a staggering 15 percent in one year. Usage is still high, at 67 percent of young Americans, but such a precipitous decline does not bode well for the future of the platform.

October 9, 2018 – In 2001, only 12 percent of English 16- and 17-year-olds considered themselves non-drinkers; in 2016, that was up to 35 percent.

The theories about why young Britons drink less than their predecessors are intriguing but unproven, said James Nicholls, the director of research and policy development at Alcohol Research UK, a nonprofit group. But he suggested that the spread of social media is one factor.

 

 

 

 

 

That fine quote from Mike Tyson goes out to all of the barely-closeted Death-worshippers whose closely inbred family members have ruled us from the shadows all the way back to Babylon, and before.

And the set of quotes below it show that the folks in charge are not your friends, and are lying to you about basically everything, including what’s driving teen suicide.

The words “mystery“, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media Establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything.

That’s why one of the quotes up above is from an article headlined “6 Unexpected Trends in 2018 Social Media Research.”

And why another reads: “The theories about why young Britons drink less than their predecessors are intriguing but unproven.”

This is what is known as “hard-hitting journalism.”

The folks who are for this one last moment still in charge of things on our planet desperately don’t want you to realize that their barely-covert assault on humanity is not only physical, but even moreso spiritual.

But they’re getting punched repeatedly in the face by dropping social media use, dropping drug and alcohol consumption, and the “Positive Changes” guy on that Obscure Internet Blogsite.

They have no plan for it.

They’re going down.

 

 

 

December 17, 2017 – Teen Depression, Suicide Linked To Time Spent On Phones, Social Media

 

2018 – 6 Unexpected Trends in 2018 Social Media Research

Social Media Usage Is Down Overall

For the first time ever, fewer Americans are using social media than the year prior. Edison Research contacted 2000 people aged 12 and older, using random digit dialing techniques, the same methodology used each year.

In 2018, however, they found that 77 percent of Americans use social media, compared to 80 percent in 2017.

This is a nearly four percent drop in social media usage nationwide. While not massive as a solo data point, remember that social media usage has increased a minimum of three percent, and an average of 7.77 percent, for the past nine years.

In terms of what we consider to be the primary “social networks” (Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Instagram, et al.), we may have reached “peak social media.” It’s likely that we’ll see a subsequent decline in usage in 2019.

This is because young Americans are embracing messaging platforms like WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, Snapchat, and others, while using the core social networks less. I certainly don’t foresee a massive “extinction event” that would cause a collapse in social media usage, but the migration away from public social toward private social is very, very real.

Any drop in social media usage is unprecedented, and indicates that Americans are not wholly satisfied with social in ways they may have been in the past.

Facebook Usage Is Down Overall

Facebook is the biggest contributor to the overall decrease in social media usage. Last year, more than two-thirds of all Americans said they use Facebook. This year, usage dropped from 67 percent to 62 percent, the first decline in Facebook’s history.

Perhaps the constant arguing (about politics, mostly) on Facebook is making it a less joyful experience and chasing people off of the platform. I don’t think that’s the only reason for the decline, but it’s certainly part of it.

I wrote an entire blog post about other reasons why Facebook’s audience is slipping: Facebook Usage Declined and the 3 Reasons Why.

It will be interesting to see what Edison’s upcoming 2018 social media research findings show for Facebook usage in Canada and Australia. That data might yield some clues as to whether America’s toxic political climate is having an impact on Facebook usage that is USA-specific.

Facebook Usage Is WAY Down Among Young People

Facebook’s demise as a hangout for young Americans has been long rumored, but the math finally supports the premise.

2018 social media research facebook usage

Among 12 to 34 year-olds, Facebook usage declined a staggering 15 percent in one year. Usage is still high, at 67 percent of young Americans, but such a precipitous decline does not bode well for the future of the platform.

And in a related trend, for the first time ever, Facebook is more popular among middle-aged Americans than it is among young Americans. This is remarkable, considering that Facebook was developed as a platform that ONLY students could use.

Twitter Usage Is Also Down

While the decline in Facebook usage represents the biggest share of America’s reduction in social media time spent, Twitter experienced a similar falloff.

Twitter’s overall usage is—as it has been for a long time—about one-third that of Facebook.

But this year, Twitter’s usage also declined for the first time ever. This pattern mimics Facebook’s almost exactly, with a bump between 2016 and 2017, and then a retreat in 2018.

2018 social media research social network usage

This 2018 social media research found that 21 percent of Americans 12 years or older use Twitter, making it the sixth most popular social network.

Snapchat and Instagram Are Pulling Away Among Young People

In 2017, 19 percent of Americans 12 to 34 used Snapchat more than any other social network. Instagram was best-loved by another 18 percent.

This year, Snapchat is the favorite social network of 29 percent of 12 to 34 year-olds. This is a huge climb in just 12 months. Instagram also saw growth, with 22 percent now saying it’s their favorite.

What are these young Americans using less, so that they can use Snapchat and Instagram more? Facebook, which declined as a favorite from 48 percent to 35 percent in one year.

 

January 8, 2018 – Teens’ Drug Use Is Lower Than Ever (Mostly)

 

January 11, 2018 – US alcohol consumption drops for a second year

 

February 8, 2018 – Drugs, Alcohol and Suicide Are Causing Life Expectancy to Drop

 

September 3, 2018 – Australians drinking less alcohol now than any time in past 50 years

 

October 9, 2018 – Britain’s ‘New Puritans‘: Youth Drinking Falls Dramatically

Underage drinking has dropped sharply among European youths

There are competing ideas about what is driving the trend, but it has been documented in multiple studies, including one released in late September, based on surveys conducted every four years for the World Health Organization in more than 30 countries.

A report from the University of Sheffield, based on a different set of surveys and also released recently, found similarly striking results among minors and young adults in England. In 2002, 25 percent of people aged 8 to 12 said they had tried alcohol, but in 2016, just 4 percent had. In 2001, it found, only 12 percent of English 16- and 17-year-olds considered themselves non-drinkers; in 2016, that was up to 35 percent.

“The scale of change is such that some news outlets have labeled today’s youth as ‘the new puritans’ and ‘generation sensible’,” the Sheffield report said.

The theories about why young Britons drink less than their predecessors are intriguing but unproven, said James Nicholls, the director of research and policy development at Alcohol Research UK, a nonprofit group. But he suggested that the spread of social media is one factor.

 

 

 

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