“It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, it’s the size of the fight in the dog.”

“It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, it’s the size of the fight in the dog.”

Mark Twain

 

 

It’s October, 2018, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime.

There are several recent news accounts below to support that assertion.

In one of them, we learn how the Wyoming State Record freshwater drum from 2018 was 30.89% larger than the previous record from 2012. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

Analysis of the last three Wyoming State freshwater drum records shows that the average increase in size of the drum was 2.46% per year from 1993 to 2012, and 5.14% per year from 2012 to 2018. Since 2012, there’s been an increase in that statistic of 109% – meaning the growth rate has more than doubled.

The percentage between such records is necessarily going to get smaller and smaller as one goes into the future, because the species has evolved to near the edge of its limits through our history of keeping records, and there have been no wholesale changes in the environment to drive any other sort of change.

It should have gotten smaller, yet, here, we see the exact opposite. And these are just three out of  a very large number of similar examples in this thread.

This sort of analysis, performed by a layperson in their spare time, upends and unmasks the mean-spirited Western materialism that holds that there is no such thing as the Ether, which is why there’s a worldwide news blackout in place on the subject.

I’m in my fifth year of documenting it, and, because of literally Millenia of conditioning laid down by the folks running the blackout, I’m still the only person on the planet that I know of that’s talking about it. That includes everyone who studies fish for a living, or in school.

Yet the evidence is irrefutable, so it’s only a matter of time until a wider awareness of the situation develops.

In the meantime, if you haven’t already done so, I’d urge you to distribute simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices where you live and work today, or sponsor a gifter near you, perhaps even through a vehicle such as this forum.

 

 

May 22, 2018 – Potential World Record: 53-Pound Red Drum Caught From Kayak On Fly

The International Game Fish Association (IGFA) is currently reviewing the world record application for a red drum caught by Rob Choi while fly fishing on a 20-pound tippet. This catch, if approved, will far surpass the existing world record of 41 pounds.

(Did you notice they gave you the numbers, but didn’t provide any sort of analysis on them? That’s a standard protocol within the worldwide news blackout on this subject. They used the general “far surpass”, instead of letting you know, specifically, that it’s a 29.2% increase. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. – ed)

 

June 10, 2018 – Outdoors: NJ record for landlocked salmon pending

(They worded it that way to avoid saying “salmon record”. – ed)

A new New Jersey landlocked salmon record is pending.

Runlevy Rodriquez caught the 8.5-pound 25¾-inch salmon in Lake Aeroflex on  June 2.

Ed Kazar of Andover Hunt & Fish, where she weighed-in and measured the big fish, said she has targeted salmon for years, caught it around 9 a.m. in 60 feet of water.

He said Runlevy is a expert fisher.

The state Division of Fish and Wildlife was still in the process of certifying the record on Friday, “but they say it looks good, so it’s a pending state record,” said Ed of Hunt & Fish, 196 Main St., Andover.  Ed’s shop rents boats on Aeroflex.

The record for salmon was 8 pounds set in 1951 by John Mount, also at Aeroflex,  which used to be called New Wawayanda Lake.

(Did you notice they gave you the numbers, but didn’t provide any sort of analysis on them? That’s a standard protocol within the worldwide news blackout on this subject. There’s no descriptor of how much the new record exceeds the old. It’s a 6.25% increase. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

 

July 21, 2018 – State record-breaking fish caught at Keyhole Reservoir

(Saying “record breaking fish“, is general, and deliberately obfuscates the specific “record breaking freshwater drum”. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. – ed)

(Moorcroft, Wyo.) – For the second time in as many months, a state record-breaking fish has been caught in the Northcentral and Northeast Wyoming region. On July 15, 2018, Gillette resident James Potter Jr. caught a 22.58-pound freshwater drum in Keyhole Reservoir, breaking the existing state record by more than four pounds.

“It was quite the moment when we put it on the scale and it printed out that ticket,” said Potter.  “I saw that 22 pounds and said ‘we just beat the record! We just blew it out of the water!’”

The previous freshwater drum record was set in August 2012 by Harley Speed. That fish also came from Keyhole Reservoir and weighed 17 pounds, 4 ounces. Prior to Speed’s catch, the record Wyoming drum was an 11-pound, 12-ounce fish caught in Glendo Reservoir in 1993

(Did you notice they gave you the numbers, but didn’t provide any sort of analysis on them? That’s a standard protocol within the worldwide news blackout on this subject. They also used “22.58 pounds” for the new record, and “17 pounds 4 ounces” and “11 pound 12 ounces” for the old records. That’s a deliberate complication/obfuscation, and it made it more difficult for me to do the math.

.58 of a pound is 9.28 ounces. 17 pounds, 4 ounces to 22 pounds, 9.28 ounces is 276 ounces to 361.28 ounces, which means the Wyoming State Record freshwater drum from 2018 was 30.89% larger than the previous record from 2012.

11 pounds 12 ounces is 188 ounces...a 92.1% increase from 1993 to 2018. A 46.8% increase from 1993 to 2012 and a 92.1% increase from 1993 to 2018. That’s a long term average of 3.684% per year from 1993 to 2018. The average was 2.46% per year from 1993 to 2012, and 5.14% per year from 2012 to 2018. 2.46 to 5.14 is an increase of 109%, or more than double.

Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *