2018 – Whale numbers on Australia’s west coast have risen 150% in the last four years.

“In the vast laboratories of the Ministry of Peace, and in the experimental stations hidden in the Brazilian forests, or in the Australian desert, or on lost islands of the Antarctic, the teams of experts are indefatigably at work. Some are concerned simply with planning the logistics of future wars; others devise larger and larger rocket bombs, more and more powerful explosives, and more and more impenetrable armour-plating; others search for new and deadlier gases, or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents, or for breeds of disease germs immunized against all possible antibodies…”

George Orwell, from “1984“, 1949

 

July 14, 2018 – “The maybe-not-so good: While the current situation is a happy one for the whales, the long-term outlook might not be so rosy. Melting sea could cause the krill population to drop rapidly.

 

 

 

“Doublethink lies at the very heart of Ingsoc, since the essential act of the Party is to use conscious deception while retaining the firmness of purpose that goes with complete honesty.”

 – Ibid

 

April 27, 2018 – Nancy Black and Monterey Bay Whale Watch were featured in an SFGATE article, Record number of killer whales show up to feast in Monterey Bay.

More than 50 whales were spotted in one day this spring..

July 9, 2018 – Orcas of the Pacific Northwest Are Starving and Disappearing -The population of endangered killer whales has hit a 30-year low, numbering only 75 this year.

 

 

October 19, 2017 – A record number of whales counted in Argentina’s Patagonia

Conservation groups say a record number of Southern right whales were counted this year in Argentina’s Patagonia region

2017 – 2017-2018 North Atlantic Right Whale Unusual Mortality Event | NOAA …

In 2017, there was a total of 17 confirmed dead stranded whales (12 in Canada; 5 in the United States).

May 5, 2018 – Facing extinction, the North Atlantic right whale cannot adapt.

 

 

 

September 13, 2018 – The narwhal itself hasn’t been named, Michaud said, as the group doesn’t tend to name “vagrants” — “because we don’t know when they will leave.”

Michaud said it’s not unusual for young whales to wander into strange habitats. Young belugas, for example, have wandered as far as New Jersey and Nova Scotia.

Some, unable to find their own kind, end up trying to make friends with boats and humans, and get fatally injured by propellers.

“That little narwhal that made a similar trip was very lucky,” Michaud said. “Because he found almost normal buddies.”

A study published in 1993 described the skull of what was believed to be a narwhal-beluga hybrid, with teeth somewhat similar to both, although that was never confirmed with DNA testing.

Nweeia, who has worked with Inuit in the Canadian Arctic and Greenland to gather traditional knowledge about narwhals and belugas, says there’s an Inuit legend that puts a narwhal among belugas. In it, a woman hunting belugas falls into the water and her hair twists into a narwhal horn.

Nweeia’s research team has also “observed the opposite,” he said, spotting belugas swimming among narwhals in Arctic Bay, Nunavut.

 

 

 

As you can see from the set of quotes immediately above, the folks in charge are not your friends, and are lying to you about basically everything, including all of the world’s whales.

It’s September, 2018, and Nature is booing and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime. Since that statement directly refutes our State Religion, which holds that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind“, I’ve appended numerous recent examples below to support it.

In response to this unprecedented turn of events, what we euphemistically call “secret agents” are engaged in ongoing animal-killing operations in an attempt to prop up the failing and wholly-fraudulent “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying” confidence game on behalf of the barely-closeted Death-worshippers they work for who run it.

The words “mystery“, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments want to lie about, well, basically anything. Two of those variants are “unusual” and “surprised“.

That’s why one of the articles up above says “2017-2018 North Atlantic Right Whale Unusual Mortality Event.”

And why another, forwarded to me by Carlos (thanks, correspondent Carlos!) says “An unusual visitor has been hanging out in the St. Lawrence River for the past three years: A narwhal, more than 1,000 kilometres south of its usual range.” And why it goes on to say “Kristin Laidre, a University of Washington researcher who has studied narwhals and other Arctic marine mammals for nearly two decades, said she’s surprised that a narwhal has been spotted so far south — and interacting so closely with belugas.”

That story is great because it features the “animal kingdom more harmonious than ever” positive change that is a significant vertical within this research.

Re: barely-covert animal-killing  operations, that’s why the same article says “Some, unable to find their own kind, end up trying to make friends with boats and humans, and get fatally injured by propellers.”

And “Narwhals are the most vulnerable marine mammals to Arctic vessels, polar bears the least, study says)

That claptrap from the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Media establishment gives the aforementioned agents the cover to run over as many marine mammals as they can with impunity. In an article previously featured in this thread, seals who had been run down and killed in Scotland were said to have “mystery corkscrew injuries“, that were later attributed to cannibalism by the seals.

Yes, unfortunately, these are precisely the sort of people we are dealing with. They’re cannibals, themselves, and always have been – blood drinking, the whole nine. Which is why they mentioned it – bizarrely – in their article.

As you read the press accounts I’ve collected below, I think you’ll see that our about-to-be-former Dark masters, who’ve ruled us from the shadows all they way back to Babylon, and before, are not doing very well. They’re losing the battle on every front, around the world, which is why I can write about it and prove it so easily every day.

Thanks for taking the time to read this. If you haven’t already done so, please consider distributing simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices where you live and work today, and writing about your experiences and impressions, here in this forum.

This is the time to press our advantage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2017 – 2017-2018 North Atlantic Right Whale Unusual Mortality Event | NOAA …

In 2017, there was a total of 17 confirmed dead stranded whales (12 in Canada; 5 in the United States).

 

October 19, 2017 – A record number of whales counted in Argentina’s Patagonia – Phys.org

Conservation groups say a record number of Southern right whales were counted this year in Argentina’s Patagonia region.

 

April 27, 2018 – Nancy Black and Monterey Bay Whale Watch were featured in an SFGATE article, Record number of killer whales show up to feast in Monterey Bay.

More than 50 whales were spotted in one day this spring.

(Carefully hedges by using the general “more than 50”, rather than providing the number, which would have been more impactful. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. – ed)

 

May 3, 2018 – Australia – whale season has started early with more than 30,000 whales

A RECORD number of whales are expected to pass the Gold Coast this year as their population continues to boom.

An estimated 30,000 whales will makes their migration up north past the Gold Coast, up from only 12,000 whales four years ago.

(Carefully hedges by using the general “more than 30,000“, rather than providing the number, which would have been more impactful. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. They also took care to give you the numbers, but withhold the percentage increase between them, as providing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. Whale numbers on Australia’s west coast have risen 150% in the last four years. – ed)

 

May 5, 2018 – Facing extinction, the North Atlantic right whale cannot adapt.

 

July 9, 2018 – Orcas of the Pacific Northwest Are Starving and Disappearing

The population of endangered killer whales has hit a 30-year low, numbering only 75 this year.

 

 

July 14, 2018 · After being hunted almost to extinction, the humpback whale population has rebounded dramatically.

Rapidly melting Antarctica ice poses a threat to coastal cities, but there is at least one species that is benefiting: Humpback whales are flourishing these days, due to an abundance of krill.

(That’s the rebounding environment, actually, not the “fewer whales eating” plausible-deniability excuse, as falsely alleged. – ed)

Nineteenth-century commercial whaling killed the vast majority of the world’s whales, so this current revival of the humpback whale should be celebrated as a conservation victory, says University of California, Santa Cruz, researcher Ari Friedlaender. Nevertheless, there are questions about how long the krill boom might last.

Over a five- to six-year period, Friedlaender and his team found high levels of pregnant females in the humpback whale population off the coast of Antarctica in every year of their study — a good indicator that the population is growing. On average, he says, over 50 percent of the females in the population were pregnant in any given year, and in one year, over 70 percent were pregnant.

(Growing fertility, verdance – ed)

“In other populations around the world, typically two or three years is the interval between having a calf, and it takes the animal that long just to be able to grow a calf and wean it. In the Antarctic, some humpback whales were reproducing annually,” Friedlaender says. For these enormous creatures, growing a calf while simultaneously lactating requires enormous amounts of energy. It is something they can do only with an almost unlimited supply of food.

The whaling industry in the Southern Ocean killed over 2 million baleen whales before commercial whale hunting was banned in the 1980s, Friedlaender says. “These are staggering numbers. … [Our study] shows that if you leave some of these populations alone, they do have the capacity and the ability to rebound. We should be hopeful and optimistic at some level that we can reverse some of the things that we did that were so detrimental to these animals.”

Friedlaender says the whale baby boom has several causes, some good and some maybe not so good.

The good: The whales are responding to the availability of food left over after so many whales were killed, which indicates the population’s capacity to rebuild itself, even when reduced to such low numbers.

The Antarctic Peninsula is warming faster than almost any other place on the planet, and this is resulting in fewer and fewer days when the water is covered by sea ice. In a given year, winter might come a month later and spring a month earlier. Whales don’t enter waters under sea ice, so this means they could have as much as two extra months a year to feed in Antarctic waters. “So, it may be that climate change is actually increasing the number of days for these whales to be able to forage and therefore to gain energy and reproduce,” he says.

The maybe-not-so good: While the current situation is a happy one for the whales, the long-term outlook might not be so rosy. Melting sea could cause the krill population to drop rapidly.

(They’re feverishly working on the krill-killing virus back at headquarters – ed)

“It’s a very quick step down in terms of how much food is available for all the krill predators, and then you limit how many animals might actually be able to subsist on that krill,” Friedlaender explains. “So, while right now it might be a very good time to be a humpback whale, in the future, once the changes that are happening affect the amount of food that’s available for them, it’s going to limit how many animals can [survive] there.”

He continues: “In nature, when resources become limiting, you have competition, and it may be that humpback whales are going to compete with the penguins or the seals or the other things in the Antarctic that rely on krill as a main food source. Nature has a way of sorting those things out, and it typically means there’s going to be winners and losers.”

 

August 2, 2018 – U.K. – National Whale and Dolphin Watch sees record sightings reported

The Sea Watch Foundation is asking members of the public to report sightings of whales and dophins

(So they can say, “we got more people looking, that’s why the count numbers are rising.” – ed”)

Record numbers of whale and dolphin sightings have been submitted to an annual marine mammal monitoring event, according to organisers.

Every year scientists at the Sea Watch Foundation ask members of the public to contribute to their National Whale and Dolphin Watch.

This year’s event runs until August 5, and has already seen a record number of species spotted across the UK, from Shetland down to south Devon and from the west coast of Wales to the Outer Hebrides.

More than 200 sightings have been reported, with the number expected to rise further by the weekend.

The scheme, in its 17th year, is part of efforts to inform Sea Watch’s database and aid protection and conservation.

 

September 13, 2018 – Beluga whales adopt lost narwhal in St. Lawrence River

The narwhal, a species which normally lives in the Arctic, has been spotted for 3 years in a row

An unusual visitor has been hanging out in the St. Lawrence River for the past three years: A narwhal, more than 1,000 kilometres south of its usual range.

But the lone narwhal is not alone — it appears he has been adopted by a band of belugas.

The narwhal — thought to be a juvenile male because of its half-metre-long tusk — was filmed in July playing among a pod of young belugas, thought to be mostly or all males.

The video was taken by the Group for Research and Education on Marine Mammals (GREMM), a non-profit group dedicated to whale research, conservation and education based in Tadoussac, Que.

“It behaves like it was one of the boys,” said Robert Michaud, the group’s president and scientific director.

In the drone footage captured by GREMM researchers and posted on their website Whales Online, a pod of nine or 10 belugas swim closely together near the surface, rolling and rubbing against each other.

“They are in constant contact with each other,” Michaud said. “It’s a like a big social ball of young juveniles that are playing some social, sexual games.”

The interactions between the narwhal and the belugas appear to be identical to those among just the belugas, suggesting the narwhal has been fully accepted as part of the group.

(Narwhals most vulnerable marine mammals to Arctic vessels, polar bears the least, study says)

Narwhals live in the icy waters of the Arctic, including those surrounding parts of Canada, Norway, Greenland and Russia. They typically don’t range any farther south than northern Quebec’s Ungava Bay, located south of the southern tip of Baffin Island.

One was previously spotted in the St. Lawrence estuary by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans in 2003, according to GREMM.

But sightings are rare enough that there was a bit of a buzz when the researchers aboard GREMM’s boat, Le Bleuvet, spotted one on July 29, 2016, among a pod of 60 to 80 belugas.

Blowing bubbles with belugas

The researchers reported that it behaved like the belugas, even blowing bubbles from time to time, and drawing no special attention, except from one curious juvenile beluga.

The same narwhal — identified from photographs of its unique markings — was spotted again the following year, in 2017, and three times this year, likely with the same population of belugas, some of whom are identified and named by GREMM.

The group tracks and studies the whales from June to October, but loses track of them in the winter, when ice prevents GREMM from getting out in the research boat.

The narwhal itself hasn’t been named, Michaud said, as the group doesn’t tend to name “vagrants” — “because we don’t know when they will leave.”

So how did the narwhal end up in the St. Lawrence in the first place?

The narwhal was first spotted among the belugas of the St. Lawrence in 2016. (GREMM)

Michaud said it’s not unusual for young whales to wander into strange habitats. Young belugas, for example, have wandered as far as New Jersey and Nova Scotia.

Some, unable to find their own kind, end up trying to make friends with boats and humans, and get fatally injured by propellers.

“That little narwhal that made a similar trip was very lucky,” Michaud said. “Because he found almost normal buddies.”

(And avoided getting deliberately run down by special ops teams and even run of the mill, under-orders-to-do-so Navy ships – ed)

Stick to their own kind

Kristin Laidre, a University of Washington researcher who has studied narwhals and other Arctic marine mammals for nearly two decades, said she’s surprised that a narwhal has been spotted so far south — and interacting so closely with belugas.

While beluga and narwhal habitats overlap in many parts of the Arctic, they’re not observed interacting very often, and tend to be in different places at different times, especially in the summer.

“Narwhals and belugas, though closely related, are pretty different,” she said.

Narwhals are good divers that hunt deepwater fish and more comfortable in areas that are covered in dense ice in the winter. Belugas prefer coastal, shallower waters with less ice, and prefer fish like salmon and capelin that swim close to the surface.

But there are some similarities: they’re both very social species, although few details are known about their social structures. And little is known about how similar their communication may be; both make a variety of clicks and chirps.

There is some evidence that interaction takes place between belugas and narwhals from time to time.

A study published in 1993 described the skull of what was believed to be a narwhal-beluga hybrid, with teeth somewhat similar to both, although that was never confirmed with DNA testing.

The study was co-authored by Randall Reeves, a Canadian scientist and consultant with Okapi Wildlife Associates in Hudson, Que., who has been studying whales for 40 years.

He, too, said belugas and narwhals tend to “stick to their own kind” when they encounter one another in the north.

But Martin Nweeia, a researcher at Harvard University who has been studying narwhals for nearly two decades, said given how social both species are, he thinks they’d be similarly capable of caring and compassion. (Although he agreed not much is known about their social structures.)

Nweeia, who has worked with Inuit in the Canadian Arctic and Greenland to gather traditional knowledge about narwhals and belugas, says there’s an Inuit legend that puts a narwhal among belugas. In it, a woman hunting belugas falls into the water and her hair twists into a narwhal horn.

Nweeia’s research team has also “observed the opposite,” he said, spotting belugas swimming among narwhals in Arctic Bay, Nunavut.

“I don’t think it should surprise people,” he said. “I think it shows … the compassion and the openness of other species to welcome another member that may not look or act the same. And maybe that’s a good lesson for everyone.”

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