“It is the duty of every man, as far as his ability extends, to detect and expose delusion and error.”

“It is the duty of every man, as far as his ability extends, to detect and expose delusion and error.”

– Thomas Paine

 

 

 

January 5, 2015 – This fish sold for $37,000 at auction in Tokyo—two years ago it would have fetched $1.7 million

 

January 5, 2018 – Bluefin tuna sold for $320,000 in 1st Tsukiji sale of 2018

 

July 14, 2018: Dramatic fall in North Atlantic heat content

For example recent findings published in Nature by a team led by David J. R. Thornalley of Department of Geography, University College London, show that the heat content of the North Atlantic from zero to 700 meters depth has cooled the most dramatically since the 1950s.

 

August 29, 2018 – A single bluefin sold for more than $1.75 million at an auction in Japan in 2013. Fishermen in this month’s Sturdivant Island Tuna Tournament, which wrapped up on Aug. 4, said many of the bluefin caught that day would eventually head to Japan.

More fishing is a bad idea because of a possible return to overfishing, and because of concerns that increasingly warming oceans could retard the fish’s reproduction, Miller said.

 

 

 

As you can see from the set of quotes immediately above, the folks in charge are not your friends, and are lying to you about basically everything, including the temperature of the Atlantic Ocean, and the Tuna.

The words “mystery“, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything.

That’s why one of the Tuna articles I’ve featured below reads “$1.8M Tuna to “Affordable” $1 Tuna Sushi—The Mystery of Japanese Tuna Industry.”

And why another says “Here’s the funny thing about canned tuna: Even as Americans lost their taste for the fish and demand dropped steadily for years, the price of a can seemed to hold steady or rise. For some, it was an economic riddle.”

Price drop either when supply increases, or demand decreases, or both. As you’ll see below, tuna demand has dropped. They come right out and tell you it dropped, but carefully hedge by giving you the numbers, but then they withold the percentage of the drops, as providing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. Let’s go to the game films!

In 1990, per capita consumption of canned tuna was 3.9 pounds and by 2011, it was 2.6 pounds. And despite the campaign, it kept declining. By 2013, the figure had dropped to 2.3 pounds.”

The honest, but unpublished sentence would read “Per capita consumption of canned tuna dropped by a third (33%) from 1990 to 2011, and dropped by an additional 12% from 2011 to 2013.

They put it that way to cut it up, into two pieces, to make it less impactful. But since they’re losers, who are losing, it’s downhill for them in any direction, and I get to point it out on a daily basis, here.

And I thank them for the clarity that the speed and magnitude of the drop in tuna consumption increased markedly from 2011 to 2013.

After a lot of work, and pain, and suffering, the actual truthful sentence is “per capita consumption of canned tuna dropped by over 40% from 1990 to 2013.” (41% – ed). Dropped by almost half!

And then there’s the article about the top Tuna businesses getting together to try to keep the price artificially high. One of them has already been indicted, true story.

The Tuna, like everything else, are booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime. And, since that statement directly refutes our State Religion, which holds that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind“, I’ve appended multiple recent examples below to support it.

I think anyone examining the “Tuna” Confidence game that’s being run and this breakdown of it can agree that it’s collapsing, and rapidly.

The positive changes I’m documenting here are increasing in speed and magnitude, they’re increasing exponentially. And the collapse of the scam is going to proceed in the same fashion. When such schemes collapse, they do so in a rush, like a house of cards.

Please consider posting your Orgonite gifting reports on this forum, or sending things to me that you think represent Positive Changes that are occurring at this time.

They’re out there to document, trust me. I’m one guy, doing this on a very much part time basis.

And your view will necessarily be different than my own, and so you will by definition find things that I’ve missed, based on your different point of view. I’d never see them, unless you pointed them out to me.

This is the time to press our advantage.

If you are on the fence, jump down, let’s make this happen! We’ve lost Don Croft, and by necessity others will come along, inspired by him, stepping up to honor him.

Please don’t come all the way to this Obscure Internet Forum and sit in silence. Do something, say something, I’ll bet you’ll be glad you did.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 5, 2009 – Premium tuna fetches $100,000 at auction

 

January 5, 2010 – Tuna hits highest price in nine years at Tokyo auction

Tuna stocks are running low but demand for the delicacy remains high

A tuna has been sold at auction in Tokyo’s fish market for 16.28 million yen ($175,000, the highest price paid in Japan for nine years.

 

January 4, 2011 – Top-of-the-line tuna sells for $400,000 in Japan – Reuters

 

January 5, 2012 – Bluefin tuna auctioned in Tokyo for record $736,000

In February 2012 the Bureau Labour Statistics (BLS) price indexes showed that the canned seafood price, including for canned tuna, increased by 10.9% at wholesale and 6.6% at retail levels compared with the same period in 2010.

 

January 4, 2013 – Bluefin tuna sells for record $1.76M in Tokyo – CBS News

 

January 5, 2014 – Sushinomics: How Bluefin Tuna Became a Million-Dollar Fish

In 2013, Kiyoshi Kimura, the owner of a Japanese sushi restaurant chain, paid $1.76 million for the first bluefin at Tsukiji, which weighed 489 pounds. Kimura had paid $736,000—a world-record price at the time—for the first tuna of 2012. That fish weighed 593 pounds.

It’s no surprise, then, that journalists were steeling themselves for what was sure to come on January 4, 2014: If the past decade’s trend in pricing continued, this year’s first tuna would surely fetch more than a million dollars. But the Tsukiji fish market bucked tradition this weekend and sold its first tuna to Kimura, yet again, for a mere $70,000.

(It could be that the top Illuminist fish buyer buddies colluded together up through 2013, to pay their Union dues, as it were, and then the whole thing collapsed. From $1.76 Million to seventy grand? Come on, people, focus with me, here.

They leaned on somebody, because the number was back up to over $600K in 2017. This year, in 2018, it was back down to $320K, let’s call it roughly half of what it was just a year before.

That’s called “whipsawing”. I think we’re watching a desperate, spastic, collapsing confidence game that’s being run by a finite subset of genetically-related miscreants that we call “the One Percent”, who’ve been running things on this globe all the way back to Babylon, and before.

Please consider sending them highest Love energy as you read this. – ed)

 

January 5, 2015 – This fish sold for $37,000 at auction in Tokyo—two years ago it would have fetched $1.7 million

According to the Wall Street Journal, Kimura thinks he was able to pay so little (comparatively speaking) on account of “a successful haul of tuna near the Tsugaru strait this year.” That sounds—pardon the pun—fishy, because it’s generally accepted that the price of the first bluefin at Tsukiji is unrelated to the abundance or scarcity of available tuna. More likely, the low price this year signified a lack of rival bidders.

 

June 11, 2015 – Why Is This Fisherman Selling Threatened Bluefin Tuna For $2.99 A Pound?

 

January 5, 2016 – Overfishing fears cast aside as sushi boss pays $118,000 for single tuna

(That’s a bold Satanic inversion. The number’s a tenth of what it was three years before – yet we move on and imply that it’s a shit-ton of money, here, vs. among the lowest numbers ever paid, as in actuality – ed_

 

October 14, 2016 – $1.8M Tuna to “Affordable” $1 Tuna Sushi—The Mystery of Japanese Tuna Industry

(Hysterically and with complete irrationality implies that $1 sushi is not affordable – ed)

 

January 5, 2017 – Japan bluefun tuna fetches $632000 at Tokyo Tsukiji fish market auction

 

May 16, 2017 – Three popular tuna brands conspired to fix prices, court records allege

By Peter Whoriskey

(Beavis, or Butthead voice) His name is “whore-isky. – ed)

 

May 16, 2017 – Here’s the funny thing about canned tuna: Even as Americans lost their taste for the fish and demand dropped steadily for years, the price of a can seemed to hold steady or rise. For some, it was an economic riddle.

In the past, industry officials have described the steady or rising price of tuna as the result of scarce supply. And indeed, the wholesale price of the fish has fluctuated. But according to the May 2015 Food Outlook of the United Nations Food & Agriculture Organization tuna prices had dropped considerably in 2014: “tuna prices declined significantly due to excess supply, with frozen skipjack prices hitting a 6-year low.”

Yet, according to Walmart, “despite changes in supply and demand that should have led to lower prices, [Walmart] continued to pay higher prices for packaged tuna products.”

In 1990, per capita consumption of canned tuna was 3.9 pounds and by 2011, it was 2.6 pounds. And despite the campaign, it kept declining. By 2013, the figure had dropped to 2.3 pounds.

 

January 5, 2018 – Bluefin Tuna Brings $320,000 at Japanese Market – VOA News

 

March 28, 2018 – Easter fish: Adelaide fishmongers see drop in alternative fish prices

Adelaide fishmongers see drop in alternative whole and fillet prices in the lead up to Easter. Dianne Mattsson, The Advertiser.

Atlantic salmon, kingfish, king salmon, blue fin and yellow fin tuna.

(Can you see how they put the tuna last? That’s deliberate. – ed)

 

July 14, 2018: Dramatic fall in North Atlantic heat content

For example recent findings published in Nature by a team led by David J. R. Thornalley of Department of Geography, University College London, show that the heat content of the North Atlantic from zero to 700 meters depth has cooled the most dramatically since the 1950s.

Another very recent publication appearing in the Geophysical Research Letters by a team of researchers led by D.A. Smeed of National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK shows that surface and subsurface temperatures of the North Atlantic have fallen to their lowest levels in in more than 30 years.

 

July 24, 2018 – Bangkok skipjack prices drop to two-year low | Undercurrent News

 

August 29, 2018 – A controversial comeback for a highly prized tuna

On a drizzling summer afternoon in South Portland, marine biologist Walt Golet is helping attach a quarter-ton Atlantic bluefin tuna to a heavy crane so it can be weighed as part of New England’s premier tournament for the giant fish. And this year’s derby is different than many in the past—there are far more tuna.

A decade ago, participants in the Sturdivant Island Tuna Tournament went consecutive years in which they didn’t catch a single fish in the Gulf of Maine. This year, fishermen set a record with 30, including the 801-pound (363.33-kilogram) winner.

Their record haul is happening amid a turning point for these giant tuna, an iconic species that scientists say appears to be slowly recovering in the Atlantic Ocean. The reemergence of bluefin, which can weigh more than half a ton, has led to debate among fishermen, conservationists and scientists over just how much the big fish have recovered. It remains at a fraction of its population 60 years ago.

(That’s a baldfaced lie. How can the fisherman in the gulf of Maine have set a record just this year, if that’s the case? – ed)

“There’s probably no fish that’s ever been more politicized than Atlantic bluefin tuna,” said Golet, a University of Maine professor. “People get a passion for this fish. And people are making a living off of this fish.”

The fish have long been at the center of a battle among commercial fishermen who can make a huge amount of money on a single fish, environmentalists who see them as marvels of marine migration, and consumers who pay a hefty price for them in restaurants.

The tuna’s status as a premium sushi and sashimi fish makes it particularly valuable in Japan, as a large bluefin can easily yield hundreds of meals. A single bluefin sold for more than $1.75 million at an auction in Japan in 2013. Fishermen in this month’s Sturdivant Island Tuna Tournament, which wrapped up on Aug. 4, said many of the bluefin caught that day would eventually head to Japan.

(The propagandists take care to use a five year old statistic, and neglect this story, from January, 2018: “Bluefin tuna sold for $320,000 in 1st Tsukiji sale of 2018 – ed)

The fish, capable of crossing the Atlantic in 60 days, have been harvested by man for centuries, and annual worldwide sales total hundreds of millions of dollars. The bluefin is listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, due in large part to years of overfishing.

But international regulators say the species has recently recovered enough that it can withstand more fishing, and U.S. ocean managers implemented an increase of about 17 percent for this summer, to the delight of fishing groups. The decision prompted environmental groups to renew their calls for holding the current line on quotas.

Bluefin tuna are harvested on both sides of the Atlantic, using primarily harpoon and rod-and-reel in the west and seining nets and longline fishing in the east.

For commercial fishermen like Pete Speeches, who fishes out of Portland, the quota increase reflects a tuna resurgence seen on the water for some time.

“They’re definitely more abundant,” he said, getting ready to unload a 672.5-pound (305.04-kilogram) tuna from his boat at the Sturdivant Island tournament.

Environmental groups say they fear boosting the quota now and potentially in future years could undo years of conservation work. Shana Miller, The Ocean Foundation’s program manager for global tuna conservation, said a quota increase of hundreds of thousands of pounds was excessive.

More fishing is a bad idea because of a possible return to overfishing, and because of concerns that increasingly warming oceans could retard the fish’s reproduction, Miller said.

 

 

1 thought on ““It is the duty of every man, as far as his ability extends, to detect and expose delusion and error.”

  1. Gare clement

    “It is the duty of every man, as far as his ability extends, to detect and expose delusion and error.”

    Wonderfully veracious Thomas Paine quote Jeff!

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    Reply

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