The current Georgia state record blue catfish, from 2017, is 29% heavier than the record holder from 1979.

“I see faces and traces of home back in New York City
So you think I’m a tough kid? Is that what you heard?
Well I like to see some action and it gets into my blood.
The call me the trail blazer – Rael – electric razor
I’m the pitcher in the chain gang, we don’t believe in pain
‘Cause we’re only as strong, yes we’re only as strong,
As the weakest link in the chain.

Let me out of Pontiac when I was just seventeen,
I had to get it out of me, if you know what I mean, what I mean.”

From “Back in N.Y.C.“, by Tony Banks / Michael Rutherford / Peter Gabriel / Phil Collins / Steve Hackett, 1974

 

 

 

The current Georgia state record blue catfish, from 2017, is 29% heavier than the record holder from 1979.

The current Georgia state record blue catfish, from 2017, is 16% heavier than the previous recordholder, from 2010. Increasing 16% in seven years.

That record from 2010 was 5% heavier than the previous record from 2008. Increasing 5% in two years.

That record from 2007 was 11% heavier than the previous record from 2006. Increasing 11% in one year.

That record from 2006 was 8.8% heavier than the previous record from 1979, increasing 8.8% in 27 years.

The only two courses I ever failed were Trigonometry in High School, and Probability and Statistics in college, so all I can safely say is that the rate of change from 1979 to 2006 was far slower than the change from 2006 to 2017.

When we would expect the exact opposite – the fishes’ change in size should have decreased further and further over time, as the upper limits of physiognomy, size, and weight for the species were approached.

I suggest that this data, as well as the unified generality and obfuscation within the press accounts on the subject down through time both support my thesis of an ongoing Conspiracy to cover up the direct connection between subtle energy and biology.

Given my educational history, the fact that that I’m the guy, using statistics to bring down the Bad Guys, may be filed under “you can’t make this shit up”, and also “World Peace is at hand.”

Fish are a third bigger than when I was a kid, and I’m not being offered any explanation as to why. In fact, a strict, formulaic language of obfuscation is in place surrounding the subject.

The explanation is that the slow, steady, widespread and ever-increasing distribution of Orgonite devices in the larger environment is unknitting and transforming the global Death energy matrix patiently built and expanded by our about to be former and literally-blood-drinking Dark masters, who have ruled us from the shadows all the way back to Babylon, and before.

Please consider sending them highest Love energy as you read this.

Given the metaphorical rear naked choke hold I’ve applied with these most recent chronological analyses of individual fish records, as a sidebar I may take one of the forum’s recently booted Operatives’ advice and do some more gifting and write about it here.

Don’t you think that now is the time to press the advantage?

If you are on the fence, please consider adding your own gifting reports to the record, here – you may throw the block that blows the game open.

And I’d ask everyone who’s already here on the forum who isn’t contributing regularly to consider chiming in and letting everybody know what’s going on, how it’s going.

 

 

 

May 31, 2006 – Monster Blue Catfish Breaks 26-Year-Old State Record

Cpl. Terri Jones and James’ wife took the fish to certified scales at T&L Sea Products in Bainbridge, where the fish officially weighed 67-lbs., 8-ozs. — 5 1/2 pounds above the state record.

The previous state record blue cat was caught from Lake Clarks Hill by Ralph Barbee Jr. in September, 1979.

(Provides the numbers for the old and new records, but uses the general “5 1/2 pound above” to avoid providing a specific percentage. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.

So I had to do the math. 62 pounds to 67.5 pounds is 11% heavier than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

 

June 20, 2008 – 15-Year-Old Catches Georgia Record Blue Cat

Fifteen-year-old angler Tyler Dodson of Carrollton, Georgia (Carroll County) reeled in the new state record blue catfish from a private 18-acre neighborhood lake on December 24, 2007.

According to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division (WRD), Dodson’s 75-pound, 49-inch catch trumps the former state record by more than seven pounds. The previous record weighed in at 67 pounds, 8 ounces and was caught in 2006 from the Chattahoochee River (below Columbia Lock and Dam) by James Franklin Tyus of Brinson (Decatur County).

(Provides the numbers for the old and new records, but uses the general “by more than seven pounds” to avoid providing a specific number or percentage. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.

So I had to do the math. It’s 11% heavier than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

 

February 17, 2010 – New Record Blue Catfish in Georgia

Angler Earnest Timpson of Edison, Ga. (Calhoun County) reeled in the new state record blue catfish from Lake Walter F. George on February 2, 2010.

According to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division (WRD), this 80 lbs., 4 oz., 49-inch catch beats the former state record by more than five pounds. The previous record weighed in at 75 pounds and was caught in 2008 from a private pond near Carrollton by Tyler Dodson.

(Provides the numbers for the old and new records, but uses the general “by more than five pounds” to avoid providing a specific number or percentage. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.

So I had to do the math. It’s 7% heavier than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

 

August 5, 2015 – The state record blue catfish (80 pounds, 4 ounces) was caught in the tailrace of this lake by Ernest Timpson in February 2010.

 

October 17, 2017 – Georgia – New State Record Blue Catfish Caught on Altamaha River

A day of fishing is good. A day you catch a new state record – and beat the old one by more than 12 pounds – is great! Richard Barrett is the new state record holder for the blue catfish. His catch, weighing 93 lb, 0 oz, beat the previous 2010 record of 80 lb, 4 oz., according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division (WRD).

(Provides the numbers for the old and new records, but uses the general “by more than 12 pounds” to avoid providing a specific number or percentage. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.

So I had to do the math. It’s 16% heavier than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *