The current Michigan state record Black Buffalo sucker fish, from 2018, was 40% larger than the record fish from 2004.

“My name is Sherlock Holmes. It is my business to know what other people do not know.”

From “The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle“, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1892

 

 

 

I sent the data at the core of this post to a few close friends with the e-mail subject “Eureka, I have found it!”

But the first person I wanted to send it to was Don Croft, God rest his soul.

It’s what I feel represents the most concrete scientific evidence yet supporting my thesis. Here’s how it goes:

The Michigan state record Black Buffalo sucker went from 33.25 pounds in 2004, to 46.54 pounds in June 2018. That’s an increase of 40% in 14 years.

By the way, they didn’t print the percentage between the old and new records in any of the articles that I got this information from. That’s one of the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding this subject. So I had to do the math in all of the cases.

Here’s how it broke down over that 14-year time period:

The Michigan state record Black Buffalo sucker went from 33.25 pounds in 2004, to 37.5 pounds in September 2012. That’s a 13% increase in 8 years. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

The record then went from from 37.5 pounds in September 2012, to 41.25 pounds in June 2014. That’s a 10% increase, in two years. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. I’m not a statistician, but the rate of change has clearly increased.

Then the record went from 41.25 pounds in June 2014 to 44.5 pounds in June, 2015. That’s an 8% increase, in one year. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

Then the record went from 44.54 pounds in June 2015 to 46.54 pounds in June, 2018. That’s a 4.5% increase, in one year. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

2012 to 2014 is where the change rate is the greatest.

We can see how the positive change is increasing in speed and magnitude – up 13% in 8 years, then up 10% in two years, then up 8%, in one year. Then settling down with another still-needle-moving 4.5% increase the following year.

Such records are usually broken by tiny margins, and any gains at the top end should be incremental, not quantum, given no quantum changes in the environment.

Ergo, we’ve got an unidentified quantum change in the environment, which I have identified as the slow, steady, but ever-increasing level of Positive Orgone Radiation in the environment, and the slow, steady, but ever-decreasing level of the Dead Orgone Radiation in the environment.

Orgonite devices distributed around the globe are, with ever-increasing speed, unknitting and transforming the global Death energy matrix patiently built and expanded over literally Millenia by our about-to-be-former, literally-blood-drinking Dark masters.

I’ve quickly researched other fish records over time, and have found the same statistical correlation. And the same propaganda techniques mapping between the coverage of the records.

“If there were Some Big Conspiracy, you couldn’t keep it a secret…somebody would notice, someone would speak up.” Yes!

If you haven’t already done so, please consider distributing simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices where you live and work today, or sponsor a gifter near you, perhaps even through a vehicle such as this forum.

 

 

 

 

September 17, 2012 – Michigan – Kalamazoo fisherman lands state’s biggest Black Buffalo sucker on Kalamazoo River

A Kalamazoo angler has landed the state’s largest Black Buffalo sucker, breaking a record that has stood for more than 8 years.

Bryan DeGoede was on the Kalamazoo River below the Allegan Dam at a little before midnight Sept. 5 when he landed the 37.5-pound, 39.3-inch fish, using a bow and arrow, said Jay Wesley, Department of Natural Resources fisheries manager for Southwest Michigan.

The previous state-record Black Buffalo was caught by Brad Nietering of Nunica on the Grand River in Ottawa County on May 19, 2004.

(The article contains no further information on the previous record. I had to research a separate story to learn “The previous state-record black buffalo was caught by Brad Nietering of Nunica on the Grand River (Bruce’s Bayou) in Ottawa County on May 19, 2004. That fish weighed 33.25 pounds and measured 36.5 inches.” – ed)

The record went from 33.25 pounds in 2004, to 37.5 pounds in 2012 – ed)

 

June 22, 2015 – The state record for black buffalo goes to Sage Colegrove of Muskegon.

The fish, weighing 44.54 pounds and measuring 38.50 inches, was caught on the Grand River in Ottawa County at 1 a.m. Sunday, April 12, when Colegrove and a friend were bowfishing.

The previous state-record black buffalo was caught by Joshua Teunis on Bear Lake June 15, 2014. That fish weighed 41.25 pounds and measured 38.25 inches.

 

June 15, 2018 – Muskegon man shatters state record for his 47-pound fish

Holy mackerel! When it comes to Muskegon fisherman Brandonn Kramer, perhaps the phrase “holy 46.54-pound black buffalo” is more fitting.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources took to social media yesterday to congratulate a new record-breaking fisherman. Last month, Kramer broke the state record with his nearly his 47-pound catch while bowfishing (a form of fishing that requires archery equipment) along the Grand River in Ottawa County. The previous record was held by an angler who bagged a 44.54-pound black buffalo on the same river in the same county in 2015.

 

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