Ongoing animal-killing operations executed by what we euphemistically call “secret agents”

“In vast laboratories in the Ministry of Peace, and in experimental stations, teams of experts are indefatigably at work searching for new and deadlier gases; or for soluble poisons capable of being produced in such quantities as to destroy the vegetation of whole continents; or for breeds of disease germs immunised against all possible antibodies.”

George Orwell, from “1984“, 1949

 

 

It’s August 2018, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime.

In response to this unprecendented resurgence of life, ongoing animal-killing operations are being executed by what we euphemistically call “secret agents” trying to prop up the failing and wholly-fraudulent “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying” confidence game on behalf of the barely-closeted Death worshippers they work for. Sometimes they use designer virii, and at others sonic weaponry, or blunt force trauma, or poisons…the list is a large one.

I’ve been patiently chronicling these operations in this thread four four straight years, now, while pointing out the same propaganda techniques and tactics used to cover up all of them.

The words “mystery“, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything.

That’s why one of the articles I’ve appended below says “the total population of kangaroos in New South Wales had reached a record 17.4 million last year, but now due to the mysterious malady affecting the animals these numbers have dropped by up to 40%.

And it’s why another says “The virtual disappearance of young-of-the-year (mahi mahi) fish in 2016 was a blindside for fishery scientists,” said Don Hammond of Charleston, S.C., retired S.C. Department of Natural Resources fishery biologist who founded the Dolphinfish Research Program and ran it for 16 years before retiring this year. “Not only did we not see it coming, we still do not know what caused it.

And it’s why the article goes on to say that “in 2016, after observing the decline in YOY fish, Hammond said scientists were stumped as to the cause. Speculation ranged from man-made environmental issues to natural phenomena.”

As in all the others, a plausible-deniablity excuse is played to cover up the op in this one, also:

“Hammond pointed to the possibility of latent effects from the 2010 Deep Water Horizon oil rig explosion which spilled more than 3 million barrels of crude oil into the northern Gulf of Mexico, contaminating the spawning habitats for many fishes, including dolphin.”

So the oil spill almost a decade ago took that long to show any impact, and, when the impact was shown, still no firm correlation could be established? Hence “pointed to“, “possibility of“, and the general “latent effects”. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.

But the great news is that, while the operation succeeded for a year, it was  undone shortly thereafter by the highest mahi numbers anyone’s ever seen in their lifetimes:

“The YOY fish appeared in June and July when the older gaffer fish had all but disappeared and pushed the number of fish harvested those two months 52 percent higher than what was caught in 2016 – and the highest of any year surveyed, Hammond said.”

Can you see how they’ve Satanically inverted it?

June 26, 2018 – Starfish Make Comeback After Mysterious Melting Disease – EcoWatch

A massive, but ultimately fruitless starfish-killing op, covered by formulaic meme words. Just like the massive, but ultimately-fruitless mahi-killing op, covered by the same meme words.

There are a bunch more examples below.

Please consider doing what you can to increase wider awareness of this situation.

 

November 29, 2016 – Alaska biologists research mystery of declining caribou herd

 

December 21, 2017 – Good news for Carolina dolphin anglers

2018 should be banner year for gaffer dolphin

The 2017 fishing season for dolphinfish (mahi mahi) along the coast of the Carolinas and including the entire Southeastern Atlantic region was a bad news/good news story.

The bad news was the fishing for gaffer or mature mahi mahi was very poor as had been predicted by scientists studying the fishery. The good news was that indications are the 2018 dolphin season will be a very good one, also predicted by the fishery scientists.

Key to the success, or lack of it, for dolphinfish lies with the annual occurrence of young of year fish. In 2016 scientists and fishermen alike were stunned by the lack of YOY dolphin in the fishery.

“The virtual disappearance of young-of-the-year fish in 2016 was a blindside for fishery scientists,” said Don Hammond of Charleston, S.C., retired S.C. Department of Natural Resources fishery biologist who founded the Dolphinfish Research Program and ran it for 16 years before retiring this year. “Not only did we not see it coming, we still do not know what caused it.”

As a result, the 2017 fishing season was poor for gaffer-sized, adult dolphinfish, he said. Based on tagging reports from recreational fishermen and charter boats, the average catch per boat trip in 2017 was 5.72 dolphinfish, a 28.8 percent decline from the average trip catch of 8.04 fish per trip in 2016.

“For South Carolina anglers, the months of April and May have come to represent the best fishing for gaffer-size dolphin, 36 inches fork length or more. In 2016, only three of the 126 boat trips surveyed in April and May did not catch a single dolphin. In 2017, 18 of the 152 boat trips surveyed in April and May did not catch a dolphin, roughly a 12-percent skunk rate at a time when the fishing should be at its best.”

Hammond said the one fact that fishery managers know for certain is that you must have small dolphin each year in order to have big fish in the fishery the following year. He added that the vast geographic range of the U.S. East Coast dolphin stock is the saving grace of the fishery.

In 2016, after observing the decline in YOY fish, Hammond said scientists were stumped as to the cause. Speculation ranged from man-made environmental issues to natural phenomena.

Hammond pointed tothe possibility of latent effects from the 2010 Deep Water Horizon oil rig explosion which spilled more than 3 million barrels of crude oil into the northern Gulf of Mexico, contaminating the spawning habitats for many fishes, including dolphin.

But, Hammond said then that the best case scenario would be that the low numbers were the result of some subtle change in North Atlantic ocean currents that threw the YOY migration off, and there could be a return of strong numbers of gaffer fish and YOY dolphin in 2017. While gaffer fish numbers were down this year, the return of plenty of YOY fish elated scientists and anglers alike.

“With dolphinfish, as with other highly migratory species, there is a large part of their life that we know little about. We know that these fish utilize and even circumnavigate the Sargasso Sea, riding the ocean’s many currents as far south as the Caribbean Sea. This migratory route encompasses a vast area that could harbor large numbers of dolphinfish that would normally have traveled to the U.S. coasts but for some reason did not,” he said.

Whatever was going on during that 6,000-mile trip the dolphin make each year in the open Atlantic Ocean and the Sargasso Sea, the end result was the return of good numbers of YOY fish this year.

The YOY fish appeared in June and July when the older gaffer fish had all but disappeared and pushed the number of fish harvested those two months 52 percent higher than what was caught in 2016 – and the highest of any year surveyed, Hammond said.

“The run was so strong,” Hammond said, “that it allowed participating anglers to tag more than 1,500 fish, a number that is well above the annual average number tagged.”

That fact is extremely important for avid dolphin anglers, he said.

“This should be the indicator that we have been looking for that says next year, 2018, should have a much improved fishing season for gaffer dolphin. Now we will just have to wait to see if this materializes.”

(He’s hoping the black-ops guys can get another fish-killing solution in place – ed)

Heading into retirement, Hammond has turned the reins of the Dolphinfish Research Program to the Beyond Our Shores Foundation, directed by fishery scientist Wesley Merten of Rockville, MD., who has worked with Hammond on dolphin research for the past six years.

Merten has issued a call for funding to continue the dolphinfish research and tagging program. He can be contacted at wess@beyondourshores.org or by phone at (787) 436-8300.

 

December 27, 2017 – Mystery surrounds kangaroo deaths in NSW

The total population of kangaroos in New South Wales had reached a record 17.4 million last year, but now due to the mysterious malady affecting the animals these numbers have dropped by up to 40%.

 

February 16, 2018 – Mystery of Minnesota’s disappearing moose closer to being solved

 

February 24, 2018 – Insect population decline leaves Australian scientists scratching for answers

www.abc.net.au/news/2018-02-24/decline-in-insect-population-baffles…/9481136

 

May 11, 2018 – The Monarchs Are Missing: A Butterfly Mystery by Rebecca Hirsch

 

July 31, 2018 – Penguin population on remote island has collapsed, and scientists aren’t sure why

 

PUFFINS

2016 – Scientists Have Cracked The Mystery Of Where Puffins Winter

 

February 23, 2018 – Puffin numbers for 2018 census causes concern

 

February 26, 2018 – Scientists are concerned about a sudden drop in the number of puffins on Britain’s Farne Islands. They’re blaming it on climate change and fear

 

July 1, 2018 – Research project aims to uncover why puffin population is on the wane

 

(You can see how scientists found out where Puffins winter, and two years later have managed to mess with them in some large-scale way leading to the population drop – ed)

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