Nothing survives but the way we live our lives

     

Make room for my 45’s,

Along beside your 78’s,

Nothing survives,

But the way we live our lives.

Jackson Browne, from “Daddy’s Tune”, 1976

 

 

 

In her most recent post, Dooney quite rightly said “we need to focus on Don’s Legacy.”

We don’t have an unlimited amount of time here on this Earth, and it profits us all when we ask ourselves “what are we doing with our time?”

I would charge the reader with using this moment as an opportunity to jam it into a higher gear.

 

 

It’s July, 2018, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime. Since that statement directly refutes our State Religion, which holds that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind”, I’ve appended numerous current news accounts below to support it.

There’s a global news blackout in place on this subject, with strict, repeating protocols that I’ve called out below as they are used. You’ll see they’re consistent and formulaic across all the news accounts, regardless of geography.

To maintain current programming levels, stop reading immediately and affirm “if there were Some Big Conspiracy, someone would notice, someone would speak up.”

The great, epochal positive changes that I’m documenting in this thread are only increasing in speed and magnitude, while the behavior of the Establishment whose downfall those positive changes are driving is not changing in any way whatsoever.

If they don’t bend, they’re going to be broken, and much sooner than later.

Who knows? It may be that they’ll be pressed into a different way of thinking and being by their circumstance. That they will undergo positive changes, even themselves, during this incredible time. Certainly some subset of them would, anyway.

Please consider sending them highest Love energy as your read this, and doing what you can to increase awareness of the situation, for our collective betterment.

 

 

 

 

 

July 2, 2018 – Alaska – Nushagak Powers on Breaking Harvest Records With 1.77 Million Sockeye Yesterday

Bristol Bay’s Nushagak District is once again shattering records on harvest, and may yet on its total run.

A new daily harvest record was broken yesterday in the Nushagak District with 1.77 million sockeye salmon caught. That brings the total harvest as of July 1 as more than 6.1 million sockeyes with a total run of that date of over 7.5 million sockeyes.

(The article makes no mention of the fact that these records are part of a wider trend. That’s a propaganda technique called “Compartmentalization.” – ed)

 

July 5, 2018 – Another state record fish for Illinois?

Capt. Rick Bentley with the new state record whitefish that was caught by client Kevin Deram on June 29.

A state record that was broken three times over a 33-day period last year has been broken once again.

(Biggest fish in history, again, and again, and again. What’s the variable? – ed)

Kevin Deram caught an 8-pound, 4-ounce whitefish June 29 to top the 7.5 pound whitefish caught March 22, 2017 at Montrose Harbor by Ken Maggiore.

(Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding this subject, they’ve provided the numbers for the old and new records, but carefully hedged by omitting the percentage increase between them, as including it would be much more impactful, and go badly off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. It’s 10% above the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

 

July 6, 2018 – Nushagak hauls in record sockeye catches

For the fourth time this season, Nushagak District fishermen harvested over a million sockeye in a day on Monday. They set the new district record for a single day’s catch on Saturday — 1.77 million reds. Last summer was the first time that a single day’s catch broke a million since the district was established in 1884.

“It looks like there’s still a decent genetic signal for Nushagak District, so there should still be some fish continuing to come here,” said Alaska Department of Fish and Game area management biologist Tim Sands.

Out on the water, the fishing is fierce. Mike Davis has been set netting at Coffee Point for more than three decades.

“Fish hit like I’ve never seen before,” he said after fishing the first million sockeye harvest day of the season on June 26. “People were just overloaded. We were overloaded. We had to call for—’hey, I can’t get all these fish on my boat.’ Fortunately, we had people who could get fish on the boat, so we were able to share that. It was just an amazing day.”

(Because Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in Mike Davis’ lifetime. Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding this subject, the article provides the new record, but carefully hedges by withholding the old record, as providing it would be much more impactful, and go badly off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all.  They’ve kept it general. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.

The Illuminist fish-counter shill quoted in the article hedges epocally by describing the biggest day in Nushugak salmon fishing history back to 1884 as “some fish” and “a decent genetic signal.” – ed)

 

July 9, 2018 – California – A record 2.45 billion-pound almond harvest could be hurt with Chinese tariffs

Almond growers project a record crop forecast at 2.45 billion pounds for the 2018 season, up 7.9 percent from 2017’s crop yield. However, the booming crop faces uncertainty over possible retaliatory tariffs by China in response to President Donald Trump’s trade policies.

 

July 24, 2018 – Wisconsin – Anglers reel in a stringer of fish records so far in 2018

A stringer full of fish records so far in 2018

With a new live release state fish records program and a growing number of anglers fishing using alternate methods like a bow and arrow, anglers are reeling in a string of state fish records in 2018, says Karl Scheidegger, the fisheries biologist who coordinates the state record fish programs.

(Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding the subject, the Illuminist fish-counter shill quoted in the article carefully hedges by states that the increase in records is due to “anglers using alternate fishing methods”, and makes no mention of these records as being part of a wider trend. That’s an example of a Propaganda technique called “Compartmentalization” – ed)

2018 Live Release records

Todd Meerdink of Waupaca caught and released a 18-1/2-inch white bass on Feb. 10 from Sunset Lake in Waupaca County. This was the second time the white bass live release record has been broken over the past year.

(Record fish, biggest in history, again and again, what’s the variable? Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding the subject, the article carefully hedges by omitting the previous record, as including it would be much more impactful, and go badly off message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. – ed)

Michael Esche of Cudahy caught and released an 11-inch bluegill on Feb. 28 from the Mississippi River in Crawford County. The fish bettered the existing record by a half-inch.

(Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding this subject, they’ve provided the number for the old and new records, but carefully hedged by omitting the percentage increase between them, as including it would be much more impactful, and go badly off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. It’s 2.3% above the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

Scott Erickson of Burlington caught and released a 23-1/2-inch rainbow trout on March 31 from a private farm pond in Racine County.

(Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding the subject, the article carefully hedges by omitting the previous record, as including it would be much more impactful, and go badly off message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. – ed)

Alex Gerucisi caught and released an 8-1/2-inch green sunfish on May 24 from an urban pond in Waukesha County.

(Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding the subject, the article carefully hedges by omitting the previous record, as including it would be much more impactful, and go badly off message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. – ed)

2018 By Weight records (hook and line)

Gregory Banbenek of Duluth MN caught an 11-3/4-inch, 3/4-pound creek chub on Jan. 1 from Amnicon Lake in Douglas County, bettering the existing record by a little over 2 ounces.

(Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding this subject, they’ve provided the number for the old and new records, carefully hedged by omitting the percentage increase between them, as including it would be much more impactful, and go badly off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. It’s 22% above the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. And they carefully hedged again by providing the general “a little over a quarter of a pound” to describe the old record, instead of providing a specific number. – ed)

Stanley Von Ruden of Norwalk set the initial record for a spotted sucker on Feb. 22 with a 20-1/2-inch, 4-pound, 10.2-ounce fish caught from Lake Onalaska in La Crosse County.

Scott Erickson of Burlington bettered the existing tiger trout record by a little over a quarter of a poundon May 9 when he stumbled on a 16-inch, 2-pound, 1-ounce fish from a private pond in Racine County.

(Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding this subject, they gave you the number for the new record, but carefully hedged by providing the general “a little over a quarter of a pound” to describe the old record, instead of providing a specific number. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. If we use 5 ounces to represent “a little more than a quarter of a pound”, that’s 35% larger than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

2018 By Weight records (alternate method)

Brandon Smith of Elkhorn bettered the existing white sucker record by almost two pounds when he shot a 24-1/2-inch, 6-pound 15.8-ounce fish on March 15 from Delavan Lake in Walworth County.

(Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding this subject, they gave you the number for the new record, but carefully hedged by providing the general “by almost two pounds” to describe the old record, instead of providing a specific number. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. If we use 28 ounces to represent “almost two pounds”, that’s 18% larger than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

Records are meant to be broken. Ross Lubner of Campbellsport quickly surpassed the Smith fish by almost half a pound when he shot a 24-1/2-inch, 7-pound, 6.7-ounce white sucker a month later on April 21 from Pine Lake in Waukesha County.

(“Records are meant to be broken” is a setup, chaff to cover the historically-remarkable stream of records documented in the article. Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding this subject, they gave you the number for the new record, but carefully hedged by providing the general “by almost half a pound” to describe the old record, instead of providing a specific number. If we use 7 ounces to represent “almost half a pound”, that’s 7% larger than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

It’s déjà vu all over again. Dale Fahrni shot a 22-inch, 5-pound, 6.7-ounce spotted sucker on April 21 from the Wisconsin River in Richland County that bettered his own record by almost half a pound set three years earlier.

(Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding this subject, they gave you the number for the new record, but carefully hedged by providing the general “by almost half a pound” to describe the old record, instead of providing a specific number. If we use 7 ounces to represent “almost half a pound”, that’s 10% larger than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. The old record was set 3 years ago, within the timespan covered by this thread and the great, epochal positive changes it documents. Data points. – ed)

Shawn Schmidt of Denmark set the initial record for a longnose sucker when he used a spear gun to shoot a 21-1/4-inch, 3-pound 9.9-ounce fish on April 29 from Lake Michigan in Door County.

Brian Thompson of Newburg Missouri shot a 35-5/8-inch, 5-pound, 1-ounce shortnose gar on May 27 from Lake Butte des Morts in Winnebago County that bested the existing record by almost half a pound.

(Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding this subject, they gave you the number for the new record, but carefully hedged by providing the general “by almost half a pound” to describe the old record, instead of providing a specific number. If we use 7 ounces to represent “almost half a pound”, that’s 13% larger than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

Jason Behrens of Arcadia shot a 56-1/8-inch, 19-pound, 5.4-ounce longnose gar on May 24 from the Mississippi River in Trempealeau County. The fish broke the current record by almost a pound.

 

(Adhering to the strict protocols of the global news blackout surrounding this subject, they gave you the number for the new record, but carefully hedged by providing the general “by almost a pound” to describe the old record, instead of providing a specific number. If we use 14 ounces to represent “almost a pound”, that’s 5% larger than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

 

 

 

 

1 thought on “Nothing survives but the way we live our lives

  1. Carl

    Very interesting since iv’e gifted most of the above mentioned lakes and rivers over the the last 10 years. Good to hear! Also many plants are coming back that have not been seen in decades.

    Reply

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