“Bluto’s right. Psychotic, but absolutely right. We gotta take these bastards…”

Bluto: What the f*ck happened to the Delta I used to know? Where’s the spirit? Where’s the guts, huh? This could be the greatest night of our lives, but you’re gonna let it be the worst. “Ooh, we’re afraid to go with you Bluto, we might get in trouble.” Well just kiss my ass from now on! Not me! I’m not gonna take this. Wormer, he’s a dead man! Marmalard, dead! Niedermeyer…

Otter: Dead! Bluto’s right. Psychotic, but absolutely right. We gotta take these bastards…

 

From John Landis’ “Animal House”, 1978

 

 

 

It’s July 2018, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime.

Since that statement directly refutes our State Religion, which holds that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind”, I’ve appended several current news stories below to support it.

The words “mystery”, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything. One of those variants is “hard to predict.”

That’s why one of the articles below reads “2018 has a chance to be only the third time since 1950 in which U.S. scallop harvesters — who dredge for scallops off places like Maine and Nantucket island in Massachusetts — collect more than 60 million pounds of the shellfish, Handy said. That most recently happened in 2006. The price of scallops in the U.S. will likely be affected by this year’s imports and exports, which are hard to predict, he said.”

Prices drop either when supply increases, or demand decreases, or both.

You may have noticed that they used the general phrase “more than 60 million pounds”, to avoid providing a specific number, which would be much more impactful, and go badly off message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all.  As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.

In another article, we learn that the top tuna at 2018’s new-year’s auction in Tokyo was “cheaper than expected.”

That’s because prices drop either when supply increases, or demand decreases, or both.

I’ve got examples of repeating propaganda technique outlined below, in several other articles, and you can read them there, if you like.

I’m exposing repetitive, misleading propaganda because I think it’s use is immoral, and that speaking up about it is the right thing to do.

 

 

 

January 5, 2018 – Tokyo, Japan – Bluefin tuna fetches ¥36.5 million in first Tsukiji sale of 2018, and last year-opener at site

A bluefin tuna fetched ¥36.45 million ($323,000), or ¥90,000 per kilogram, Friday at the final new year auction held at Tokyo’s Tsukiji fish market before its planned October relocation.

He said the price he paid was “cheaper than expected,” adding that he is “thankful” for his time learning his trade at the aging market, which has long been one of Tokyo’s top tourist attractions.

 

March 21, 2018 – Drop in price of scallops may be in store as harvest numbers continue to grow

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Good news for scallop fans. Already one of the most readily available higher-priced seafoods to consumers, the succulent shellfish could fall in price this year.

American harvests of scallops have grown in recent years, from 33.8 million pounds in 2014 to 40.5 million pounds in 2016, and are poised to go up again in 2018 due to a potential increase in the amount fishermen are allowed to bring to shore. Meanwhile, the U.S. has been importing even more scallops from countries such as China, Japan and Canada to meet consumer demand.

(Did you notice they gave you the numbers, but carefully hedged by withholding the percentage increase between them? So I had to do the math. It’s a 33% increase, in just four years. They used the general “grown” to describe it. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. – ed)

Some members of the seafood industry say it could be a recipe for the price of the shellfish to fall for consumers, who sometimes pay more than $20 per pound at supermarkets. Fishermen have received slightly less money for scallops at the docks in recent years — about $12 per pound in 2016, down about 50 cents from two years previously.

2018 has a chance to be only the third time since 1950 in which U.S. scallop harvesters — who dredge for scallops off places like Maine and Nantucket island in Massachusetts — collect more than 60 million pounds of the shellfish, Handy said. That most recently happened in 2006. The price of scallops in the U.S. will likely be affected by this year’s imports and exports, which are hard to predict, he said.

(Prices drop either when supply increases, or demand decreases, or both. – ed)

They’ve used the general “more than 60 million pounds”. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.)

 

May 21, 2018 – May has been a big month for record fish in New York.

Two state records have been broken so far this month, both of them by monster fish caught just as warmwater fishing season begins.

The state walleye and black crappie marks were both broken in a span of hours during the first weekend in May. Both fish shattered previous records.

Two new state fishing records were set over the course of one weekend in New York recently, State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced today.

“High quality fishing opportunities abound across New York and announcing two record-breaking catches is the perfect way to kick-start the 2018 freshwater fishing season,” said Commissioner Seggos. “It’s remarkable that anglers broke these records back-to-back over a single weekend and from water bodies in different regions of the state. I encourage anglers to share their notable catches with DEC this year on social media and through our Angler Achievement Awards Program.”

Brian Hartman of Alexandria Bay eclipsed the 2009 state record walleye by more than 1.5 pounds when he caught an 18-pound-2-ounce walleye from the St. Lawrence River on May 5 using a swimbait.

On May 6, William Wightman of South Dayton used a black marabou jig to reel in a 4-pound-1-ounce crappie from Lake Flavia in Cattaraugus County, exceeding the 1998 state record by five ounces.

(The story hedges by calling a weekend with two record fish merely “big”.

You may have noticed that, in the case of the crappie, they gave you the numbers for the new record, but made you do the math to get the number for the second record “by five ounces.” Then they carefully hedged again by withholding the percentage increase between them, as providing it would be much more impactful, and go badly off message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. It’s 8.3% higher than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

You may also have noticed that, in the case of the walleye, they gave you the numbers for the new records, but carefully hedged by giving you an inexact number for the old record “by more than 1.5 pounds”, and hedged again by withholding the percentage increase between them, as providing it would be much more impactful, and go badly off message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. It’s roughly 7.2% higher than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

 

May 31, 2018 – Record-breaking “monster” catfish reeled in on $20 Walmart fishing rod

When Virginia resident Jeffrey Dill went fishing at a lake in Virginia Beach last weekend, he didn’t expect to smash a 24-year-old state record.

Dill explained that he felt something pulling on the other end of his $20 Walmart rod on Saturday morning while fishing at Lake Smith. After about 15 minutes of tug-of-war with the fish, Dill pulled his catch out of the water and was shocked by what he saw.”I put him on the dock, held him down for a minute. He was so big,” said Dill, who named his prize fish “Big Earle.”

The fisherman brought “Big Earle” to a local tackle shop to be officially inspected and weighed by a Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries biologist.

“It was a monster. It was a true river monster,” said Chad Boyce, a fisheries biologist.

“Big Earle” weighed in at an enormous 68.12 pounds. Though it’s not yet official, that would smash the state record for a flathead catfish of 66.4 pounds, set in May 1994.

“I talked with some of my older buddies and they said some people fish their whole lives and never get close to a state record,” said Dill. “It’s a big deal. I’m very proud.”

(You may have noticed that they gave you the numbers of the old and new records, but carefully hedged by withholding the percentage increase between them, as providing it would be much more impactful, and go badly off message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. It’s 3% higher than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *