“Knowledge of Sensational Literature: Immense. He appears to know every detail of every horror perpetrated in the century.”

     
  1. Knowledge of Sensational Literature: Immense. He appears to know every detail of every horror perpetrated in the century.
  2. Plays the violin well.
  3. Is an expert singlestick player, boxer, and swordsman.
  4. Has a good practical knowledge of British law.”

 

From “Dr. Watson’s summary list of Sherlock Holmes’s strengths and weaknesses” in a Study in Scarlet, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1887

 

 

 

 

It’s June 2018, and the Great Artificial Drought has been broken by the slow, steady, widespread and ever-increasing distribution of simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices in the vicinity of the weather warfare infrastructure that many still mistakenly presume only carries cell phone traffic and weather radar data.

I’ve appended numerous current news stories below to support that assertion.

One of them is headlined “Chicago sets rainfall record for May, June could be warmer than normal.”

It tells us “The soggy weather log as of midday Thursday showed the area got 8.21 inches of rain this month, with nearly an inch falling Wednesday as the remnants of Subtropical Storm Alberto moved through the area. That’s well above the average 3.68 inches of rain that usually falls in May. And a half inch more rain than the record of 7.59 inches, set in May 1945. Overall, it’s been a strange spring. April had a record 16 days in which temperatures were 32 degrees or lower, according to the weather service.”

Where they hedge by using the terse phrase “well above the average” to describe rainfall 123% above average. You’ll notice that they hedged again by providing only the numbers, and carefully omitting the percentage increase, so I had to do the math. That’s more than double the average, described as “well above.

The same tactic is used for the overall rain record – presentation of the numbers, but careful omission of the percentage increase between them. The new record is 6.5% above the old. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

The words “mystery”, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything. One of those variants is “strange”.

That’s why the story from Chicago says “Overall, it’s been a strange spring. April had a record 16 days in which temperatures were 32 degrees or lower, according to the weather service.” That’s buried down in the article, which leads with “June could be warmer than normal” in the headline.

None of the stories mention that the record rainfall in their area is part of a wider trend. That’s a Propaganda technique called “compartmentalization.” It’s part of the strictly-observed protocol utilized within the global news blackout on the subject.

While a globally-controlled Media establishment may seem impressive on some levels, it can only spin – it can’t fundamentally change what’s going on, and the use of such manipulative tactics will only harm those using them in the long run.

But they’re at the end of their road, and it’s all they’ve got.

Rejoice in the great, epochal positive changes that are underway at every level of our reality:

 

 

 

 

May 21, 2018 – Washington, D.C. – Last week’s rain event was a record breaker. Here’s how much fell.

The middle of May is often one of the nicest times of the year in Washington. But last week, from May 12 to May 19, it rained for eight straight days. It was the wettest mid-May week on record.

(Strict avoidance of using the much-stronger “rainiest” – ed)

Rain ruined outdoor plans and caused the Potomac River to swell to its highest level in four years. But, because the rain mostly fell at a slow and steady pace rather than all at once (Frederick, Md., was a notable exception), flash flooding was limited. All of the water also helped make up for drier-than-normal weather dating to last fall.

Washington, which posted 6.14 inches in all, logged at least 0.25 inches of rainfall on seven straight days, the longest streak with so much rain in recorded history. In fact, it received at least 0.4 inches on those days, a record-long stretch for that amount of daily rain as well.

Across the region, one to two month’s worth of rain fell in that eight-day period with widespread totals between four and eight inches.  The heaviest rainfall, from six to 10 inches, fell in our far northwest areas from Winchester to Frederick and east and southeast of the Beltway toward Annapolis and Southern Maryland. Locations to southwest saw the lowest amounts, closer to four inches.

 

May 25, 2018 – Florida – Key West Officially has Wettest May on Record

(Strict avoidance of using the much-stronger “rainiest” – ed)

 

May 31, 2018 – Florida – May rainfall records shattered in some Tampa Bay areas

The second half of May 2018 has been an exceptionally wet stretch for the Tampa Bay area and the state of Florida.

A fetch of deep tropical moisture set up across the Sunshine State during the second week of May, leading to numerous tropical downpours.

Additional moisture late in the month thanks to Subtropical Storm Alberto keep humidity levels and rain chances elevated.

Several communities in the News Channel 8 viewing area have seen records broken or, in some cases, shattered.

Lakeland has observed more than 17 inches of rain this month, making it the wettest May on record for the city and the second wettest month ever recorded.

Here is just a sample of some of the rainfall records broken for various towns and cities in the Tampa Bay area. Rainfall amounts reflect totals measured through May 30, 2018.

 

May 31, 2018 – Chicago sets rainfall record for May, June could be warmer than normal: weather service

Chicago saw the wettest May on record, thanks in part to a tropical storm that moved through the area this week, according to the National Weather Service.

(Strict avoidance of using the much-stronger “rainiest” – ed)

The soggy weather log as of midday Thursday showed the area got 8.21 inches of rain this month, with nearly an inch falling Wednesday as the remnants of Subtropical Storm Alberto moved through the area.

(Strict avoidance of using the much-stronger “rainy” – ed)

That’s well above the average 3.68 inches of rain that usually falls in May. And a half inch more rain than the record of 7.59 inches, set in May 1945.

Overall, it’s been a strange spring. April had a record 16 days in which temperatures were 32 degrees or lower, according to the weather service.

And now, summer seems to be knocking at the door.

Chicago already has seen a few days when the mercury has hit 90 degrees, including a record-setting 97 degrees Sunday, according to the weather service. It tied the record for the second hottest temperature in May. The hottest temperature ever recorded during May was 98 degrees on May 31, 1934.

Chicago typically doesn’t see temperatures reach 90 until early June, according to the weather service.

Although a high of 90 was predicted Thursday, the temperature fell just shy of that at 89 degrees, according to the weather service.

A cold front will be moving down Lake Michigan between Thursday night and Friday morning, said Andrew Krein, a weather service meteorologist. The Chicago area, especially near the lake, will be cooler Thursday because winds will be coming off Lake Michigan where water temperatures were 63 degrees closer to the shore but a chilly 47 degrees farther out, he said.

(“Cooler” hedges against the stronger “colder” – ed)

“The Chicago metro area is going to be cooler because the lake’s cool air is going to be moving inland,” Krein said.

(Three consecutive uses of the meme word “cool” – in Propaganda that’s called a “yes set”. – ed)

Inland, the expected high is 68 degrees for Friday, 73 degrees for Saturday and 76 degrees for Sunday, according to the weather service. But areas farther south could get temperatures in the 80s, Krein said.

(Hedging – contant, unyielding hedging – ed)

As June begins, meteorologists are predicting above-normal temperatures. The average June temperature is 68.9 degrees, according to the weather service.

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