On April 3, 2018, Dayton, Ohio set a new rainfall record 68% above the old, set over 50 years ago.

“To see what is in front of one’s nose needs a constant struggle.”

George Orwell

 

 

 

 

 

It’s April, 2018, and the Great Artificial Drought has been broken by the slow, steady, widespread and ever-increasing distribution of simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices in the vicinity of the weather warfare infrastructure that many still mistakenly presume only carries cell phone traffic and weather radar data.

I’ve appended numerous current news stories below to support that assertion

In the story from Ohio headlined “Record rainfall: New record set in Dayton”, they provide the old and new records, but, as part of the standard protocol within the global news blackout surround this subject, they carefully omit the percentage increase between them. So I had to do the math.

1.75 to 2.88 inches is a 64% increase over the old record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

In the story below headlined “U.S. Rainfall record? Over four feet in one day in Hawaii”, they provide the old and new records, but, as part of the standard protocol within the global news blackout surround this subject, they carefully omit the percentage increase between them. So I had to do the math.

38 inches, the Hawaiian record, to 49.69 is a 31% increase over the old Hawaiian record. 43 inches, the U.S. record, to 49.69 is 15% above the old U.S. record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

You can see how they tried to hedge from the get-go by putting “U.S. rainfall record?” with the question mark meme, right at the start of the article.

A story from Rochester, N.Y. uses another standard ploy within the news blackout, pretending to “rush to press”, and giving you half-baked data – versus doing a proper story the next day. They state that the old record was 1.12 inches, and that “Rochester’s rainfall Monday topped a 71-year-old daily record for the area, coming in at 1.24 inches by Monday evening.”

The story continues: “The previous record was 1.12 inches, set in 1947, said meteorologist Aaron Reynolds of the National Weather Service in Buffalo. And the rain showed no signs of slowing down — “We’ll be getting quite a bit more, though not as intense,” said Reynolds of the forecast into Monday night and Tuesday.”

So, yes, it “topped” the old record – by 11 percent, I had to do the math, such records are usually broken by tiny margins – but reporting on it early like that allowed them to lop off all the rainfall between 4 p.m. and midnight. The story says that the rain “showed no sign of slowing down”…yet the talking head says “a bit more, though not as intense.” Contantly, hedging, tap-dancing, defraying.

As a bonus, the article continues to elucidate how April’s temperature in Rochester was 8 degrees below normal, at that point. Wait, what? I thought we were in the midst of the hottest year in the history of planet Earth. Oh, yeah, I forgot – but that’s THERE.

Trying desperately to support the Global Warming confidence game, a story from New England from two days ago is headlined “Record rainfall leads to flooding in New England, summer-like temperatures on the way.”

This within the context of cold and snow through the first three weeks of April here in Pittsburgh.

That story continues “On Thursday more than 3 inches of rain fell near Bar Harbor, Maine, while Augusta, Maine, saw a record daily rainfall of 1.29 inches.”

Can you see how “more than three inches” is purposefully vague, and that there’s no mention whatsoever of the previous record rainfall number from Maine?

That’s more careful obfuscation, and yet another example of the standard formula used within the global news blackout surrounding the subject.

The great, stunning change documented in all of these stories is permanent – the folks in charge don’t have the manpower to find and destroy all of the individual, $3 Orgonite devices that have permanently transformed  the Death-energy-based weather warfare system. It has been tirelessly built and expanded over literally Millenia, with a huge, technology-based construction push in the late 1990’s, when the bristling forest of “communications infrastructure” was thrown up virtually overnight around the globe.

Fortunately for us all, Orgonite was invented right around the same time, and by 2006 or so we saw the tide turning back to the positive. The great, epochal positive changes documented by this thread got going around 2012, and by 2014 the eye-popping statistics began showing up, and I began chronicling them here.

If you haven’t already done so, please consider distributing simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices where you live and work today, or sponsor a gifter, perhaps even through a vehicle such as this forum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 4, 2018 – RECORD RAINFALL: New record set in Dayton

A new record for daily rainfall was set in Dayton Tuesday. According to the National Weather Service, 2.88 inches of rain fell in Dayton Tuesday, shattering the previous record of 1.75 inches set in 1957.

 

April 6, 2018 – Near-Record April Rains to Drench Central California, Soak Sierra

In the Sacramento area, the predicted 2-3” of rain would approach records for any April storm going back to 1941

 

April 11, 2018 – Another atmospheric river soaks northern California in April 2018

Weather balloons launched from Oakland, California, measured the highest precipitable water amounts on record for any months from November through May. However, just because an atmospheric river brings record-moist air doesn’t guarantee it will generate record amounts of rain or snow.

 

April 15, 2018 – Heavy rain propels Seattle to 4th-wettest April day on record 

Saturday’s soaking was the greatest one-day rainfall in Seattle in over a year—since 1.74 inches fell on Jan. 17, 2017. Seattle has now logged 4.64 inches of rain this April—nearly double the 2.71-inch norm for the entire month. April 2018 is now the fourth-wettest April on record in Seattle.

 

April 16, 2018 – Record rainfall in Roc: Monday’s steady deluge washes away 1947 record

Rainfall Monday topped a 71-year-old daily record for the area, coming in at 1.24 inches by Monday evening.

The previous record was 1.12 inches, set in 1947, said meteorologist Aaron Reynolds of the National Weather Service in Buffalo. And the rain showed no signs of slowing down — “We’ll be getting quite a bit more, though not as intense,” said Reynolds of the forecast into Monday night and Tuesday.

Temperatures are sluggishly moving toward more temperate levels. The average high so far this month is 45.1, which is about 8 degrees below normal for April, said Reynolds.

 

 

April 27, 2018 – U.S. rainfall record? Over four feet in one day in Hawaii

A small town in Hawaii may have just had the rainiest day in U.S. history

With over four feet of rain, the small town of Hanalei on the Hawaiian island of Kauai may have broken the all-time U.S. record for rainfall in 24 hours earlier this month.

A rain gauge about a mile west of Hanalei recorded a whopping 49.69 inches of rain during a 24-hour period from April 15-16, the National Weather Service in Honolulu said.

“This total, if certified, will break the current U.S. 24-hour record of 43 inches at Alvin, Texas, on July 25-26, 1979, and the state of Hawaii record of 38 inches at Kilauea, (Kauai) on Jan. 24-25, 1956,” the weather service said.

 

April 27, 2018 – Record rainfall leads to flooding in New England, summer-like temperatures on the way

On Thursday more than 3 inches of rain fell near Bar Harbor, Maine, while Augusta, Maine, saw a record daily rainfall of 1.29 inches.

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