The population of Mekong river dolphins has increased 21% in the last three years.

“The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.”

Sherlock Holmes, from “The Hound of the Baskervilles“, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1902

 

 

 

 

It’s April, 2018, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime. Since that statement directly refutes our State Religion, which holds that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind“, I’ve appended numerous recent news accounts below to support it.

 

 

 

 

 

November 2, 2017 – Sport fish make comeback on the Illinois River

New report shows Clean Water Act of 1972 sparked a turnaround

It’s a good time to fish the Illinois River. If your luck is bad, you can’t blame the fish, according to a report from the University of Illinois.

Sport fish are at their highest levels in more than a century on the river and the upswing began after implementation and enforcement of the federal Clean Water Act of 1972, according to the research paper, “Ecological Recovery of a River Fish Assemblage Following the Implementation of the Clean Water Act,” published in the journal, BioScience.

(If sport fish are at their highest levels in almost a century, how is that good, but not “great”? That’s careful hedging. “Highest levels in almost a century” is vague, general. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. A local, mechanistic plausible-deniability excuse is put forward for the increase, and no mention is made of the wider phenomenon of increasing lake and river  health that is being seen across the globe. – ed)

 

January 22, 2018 – Mysterious Jellyfish Makes a Comeback : Oceanus Magazine

Rise in toxic stings has scientists on the alert.

 

January 24, 2018 – Incredibly rare, Pokemon-like fish found to be thriving in new area

The red handfish is one of nature’s real treats. It’s a strange little bottom-dwelling fish that actually prefers to crawl along the sea floor rather than swimming, and it also happens to look like something you’d see in a Pokemon game. Unfortunately, the creature is incredibly rare. It has a status of “critically endangered” and at one point scientists believed only a few dozen of the fish even existed. That just changed in a big way, as researchers investigating reports of red handfish sightings discovered an entirely new population of the pint-sized fish, and it might signal a comeback.

(The most direct and honest sentence would read: “New population shows a comeback”…pushed back to “new population signals a comeback”…pushed further back to “new population might signal a comeback.” Two layers of careful hedging back from the truth. – ed)

“We were diving for approximately three and a half hours and at about the two hour mark we were all looking at each other thinking this is not looking promising,” Antonia Cooper of the University of Tasmania explains. “My dive partner went to tell the other divers that we were going to start heading in and I was half-heartedly flicking algae around when, lo and behold, I found a red handfish.

(Setting up the good news with the hand-waving “there’s no fish” bad-news preamble – ed)

Shortly thereafter, a few other members of the group were spotted. The new population is thought to match the previously-known group, numbering somewhere between 20 and 40 individual animals. That might not seem like a lot, but researchers believe that their discovery could be a sign that the fish are also thriving in smaller localized groups elsewhere.

(A ‘canary in the coal mine’ – particularly sensitive to Death energy in the environment – expanding its range. – ed)

 

February 6, 2018 – Smelt, beloved by ice fishermen, continue Maine comeback 

They are the subject of tighter fishing regulations than a few years ago — and fishermen say that seems to be helping the little fish rebound in some areas.

(The most direct and honest sentence would read: “tighter fishing regulations are helping the fish rebound”…walked back one level to “fishermen say that tighter regulations are helping the fish rebound”…walked back a second level to “fishermen say that tighter fishing regulations seem to be helping the fish rebound”…walked back a third level to “fishermen say that tighter fishing regulations seem to be helping the little fish rebound”…walked back a fourth level to “fishermen say that tighter fishing regulations seem to helping the little fish rebound in some areas.” Four layers of hedging. – ed)

A local, mechanistic plausible-deniability excuse, “tighter fishing regulations”,  is put forward for the increase, and no mention is made of the wider phenomenon of increasing lake  health that is being seen across the globe. – ed)

 

March 17, 2018 – River Otters Making a Comeback in Nebraska

The Omaha World-Herald reports that a Nebraska Game and Parks Commission reintroduction program that started three decades ago is restoring a species that were a common part of the Nebraska landscape before they were wiped out by unregulated trapping or hunting in the early 1900s.

Today, the river otter is on the verge of being removed from Nebraska’s list of threatened species. Estimates indicate there are more than 5,000 otters in the state.

River otters were live-trapped primarily in Alaska and Louisiana and transported to Nebraska from 1986 to 1991. Release sites were the Platte, Niobrara, South Loup, Elkhorn, Calamus and Cedar Rivers.

Biologists monitoring the critters found that their range has been expanding and their survival is high.

(A local, mechanistic plausible-deniability excuse is put forward for the increase, and no mention is made of the wider phenomenon of increasing lake and river health that is being seen across the globe. – ed)

 

March 28, 2018 – The health of the Potomac River has jumped from a ‘D’ to ‘B’ since 2011, but don’t go swimming just yet

(“Jumped” implies it went up, but will come right down again, like when you jump. – ed)

 

March 29, 2018 – A Humpback Comeback: Rare Colorado River Fish Moves Away From Extinction

(“Moves away from extinction” is the Satanically-inverted way of saying “is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in our lifetimes.” – ed)

In a recent analysis, scientists at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service say the chub’s five distinct populations throughout the Colorado River watershed in Colorado, Utah, and Arizona are stable enough to reclassify the fish as threatened rather than endangered.

The largest population of humpback chub, found at the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado rivers in the Grand Canyon of Arizona, is a stable group of about 12,000 adults according to USFWS estimates. Another 3,500 are in the Colorado River’s Westwater Canyon in Utah, plus 500 in Black Rocks in Western Colorado, near the Utah border. Other populations are found in Utah’s Cataract Canyon and Desolation and Gray Canyons. A previously documented group in Colorado’s Dinosaur National Monument haven’t been seen there since 2004.

( Where “stable enough to reclassify the fish as threatened rather than endangered” makes it sound like they’re NOT increasing, and makes it seem like the change is simply clerical. The author is careful to provide no documentation of specific numbers year to year, or the percentage change between the years. They use general terms like “stable enough”  because generality is a hallmark of propaganda. – ed)

 

March 31, 2018 – Don’t call it a comeback: The nene is on the road to recovery 

 

April 23, 2018 – Critically endangered Mekong river dolphins start to show signs of a comeback

(The most direct and honest sentence would read “Mekong river dolphins make comeback”…walked back one level to “Critically endangered Mekong river dolphins make comeback”…walked back again a second time to “Critically endangered Mekong river dolphins show signs of a comeback”…walked back a third time to “Critically endangered Mekong river dolphins start to show signs of a comeback.” Three careful layers of hedging back from the truth. – ed)

One of just a few species of river dolphins in the world, Mekong dolphins had plummeted from 200 in 1997, the first year they were counted, to just 80 in 2015. Today the population is estimated at 97 with three dolphins born just this year.

Effective patrolling by teams of river guards and the strict confiscation of illegal gill nets which trap and drown the dolphins are the main reasons for the increase, according to experts.

(They gave you the numbers from 80 in 2015 to 97 in 2018, but carefully hedge by omitting the percentage increase between them, as providing it would be much more impactful, and go badly off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. It’s a 21% increase in three years.

A local, mechanistic plausible-deniability excuse is put forward for the increase, and no mention is made of the wider phenomenon of increasing lake and river health that is being seen across the globe.

Notice how the “experts” are unnamed, bringing the unquestionable knowledge down from on-high? – ed)

2 thoughts on “The population of Mekong river dolphins has increased 21% in the last three years.

  1. Morgonite

    Jeff, I LOVE this series. It’s very helpful tool to un-do the negative word magic in our our local news. We here in GA within the last month were taken off our Level 1 drought warning for the first time in awhile and today they reported that Atlanta broke a 135 year old rain record and all anyone can talk about is how big the Flash Flood threat is. Life is booming around us and I couldn’t be happier. BTW, all this rainfall started within a week of my first pour. Not claiming responsibility but it’s an interesting correlation.

    Reply
  2. Jeff Miller Post author

    Ah, thanks so much for the positivity. The greatest part is there’s no rebuttal – because they can’t dignify any subject involving the Etheric realm with any sort of reply. Go to any “truthteller” website, and there are stories on all manner of “conspiracy” subjects. But enter the word “Orgonite” in the search box, and you’ll get few, or no hits, nothing, not to praise, not to damn. There’s a global news blackout on surrounding the subject, and I don’t think that’s a very strong position for them to be in, tactically.

    Thanks also for mentioning that you are actually an Orgonite gifter, unlike many of our new “commenters”, of late. When I poured my first batch of Orgonite TB’s on Oahu in 2005, an intense rain and lightning storm broke out, and I could viscerally feel the sudden balancing of the energy around me. Your mentioning of that correlation is what in science is called a “data point”, and I, for one, greatly appreciate you bringing it forward.

    Reply

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