Total mortality from unintentional injury increased by 11 percent in the U.S. from 1999-2005, while it increased 230% among white women between the ages of 45 and 64 during the same time period.

“I say to you, Frodo, that even as I speak to you, I perceive the Dark Lord and know his mind, or all his mind that concerns the Elves. And he gropes ever to see me and my thought. But still the door is closed!”

Lady Galadriel, from “The Fellowship of the Ring”, by J.R.R. Tolkien, 1954

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve appended an article below headlined “US life expectancy drops for second year in a row.

In that article, we learn that age-adjusted death rates decreased for seven of the top 10 leading causes of death: heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, influenza and pneumonia, and kidney disease. And we learn that the rates increased for unintentional injuries, Alzheimer’s disease and suicide.

So what on Earth is going on to drive an overall increase, two years running, and major increases in those three specific areas?

Let’s look at what’s going up:

Unintentional injuries, up 6.9%, 2014 to 2016

Alzheimer’s, up 4.9

Congenital malformations, up 3.1

Bacterial sepsis of newborn – up 1.2

Respiratory distress of newborn – up .9

Stroke, up .8

Disease of circulatory system, up .6

Suicide, up .5

Chronic lower respiratory disease, up .1

Diabetes, up .1

Let’s focus on the top two, because they’re statistically the most significant.

Unintentional injuries”…we’re assured that the majority of those are overdose deaths. I think that’s a half-truth, at best, a la “Drug use by U.S. teens drops to all-time low”, below.

I’m betting that many suicides are being systematically categorized as “unintentional injuries”, because suicide is said to have only increased .5% in two years, in a wider context of exponentially-increasing suicide rates among a number of societal subgroups, e.g. “U.S. Suicide Rate Surges to a 30-Year High”, also below.

Drawing back for a moment from that speculation, we can affirm that a drastic increase in unintentional injuries means all those people are suddenly much more “messed up in the head” in some way. And a drastic increase in Alzheimer’s means that those people are also – wait for it – “messed up in the head.

What broadly-occurring force, influence or substance could be messing up their heads, in particular, both behaviorally and physically?

Total mortality rate from unintentional injury increased in the US rose by 11 percent from 1999-2005, while white women between 45 and 64 years old experienced a 230 percent increase in the rate of poisoning mortality over the study period. White men in this age group experienced an increase of 137 percent.

What broadly-occurring force, influence or substance could be messing up the heads of people generally, but white women particularly?

What is causing white women, in particular, to kill themselves with poison at rates far beyond everyone else in society? White men were way above everyone else, too, but white women are the real “tell.” Phone-addicted white women. Facebook-addicted white women.

Did you notice they call poisoning yourself an “unintentional injury?”?

Deaths from unintentional injury increased 18.6 percent from 2014 to 2016, the largest two-year percentage since NSC began tracking the statistic in 1903. Poisoning deaths in the U.S. increased by 80% from 2000 to 2009, “largely due to prescription drug overdoses.”

Another article below states “The most common cause of death from unintentional injury among children was motor vehicle crashes; other leading causes included suffocation, drowning, poisoning, fires, and falls. Suffocation rates increased in the past decade by 30%, while vehicle crashes, drownings, fires, and falls declined by 41%, 28%, 45%, and 19%, respectively.”

Can you see how they led with “motor vehicle crashes”, when said crashes decreased 41%? They do that to deliberately take attention away fro suffocation rates, which increased by 30%, in 9 years.

What gives? That would be either a third more children suffocating themselves, to end it all, with suicide covered up as “suffocation”, or crazy parents killing a third more of their children, with murder covered up as “suffocation”, or both. It’s probably mostly the former.

I suggest that this is further evidence of the desperate, systemic Conspiracy to cover up the horrific trend I’m elucidating here. Which, to be clear, is “Technology is driving drastically increased rates of suicide and mortality.”

The article goes on to say that “teenagers aged 15 years to 19 years—the death rate increased by more than 90% in this population. Poisoning deaths associated with prescription drugs for children aged 15 years to 19 years increased from 30% in 2000 to 57% in 2009. The agency called for “appropriate prescribing, proper storage and disposal, discouraging medication sharing, and state-based prescription drug monitoring programs” to address this trend.

“Overdose epidemic” is a meme, carefully crafted to blame the drugs, themselves. But, obviously, something’s driving the kids to take more of them, to their ultimate ruin. What would drive that age group, particularly, to do such a thing? Their bingeing on technology, of course.

What death rates are going down?

Kidney disease, down .1

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome – down .7

Neonatal Hemmorage, down 1

Influenza and pneumonia, down 1.5

Cord and placental complications, down 2.9.

Maternal complications, down 4.0

Low birth weight, down 5.1

I think that shows that, whatever is going on, here, it’s impacting the heads of many people, while the baby inside the mother is less impacted. Although third in our top three is “Congenital malformations”, up 3.1%. But the person doing the birthing is impacted the most, and it’s impacting their heads the most.

It is, of course, the irradiation of the heads of those many people by their “Smart” phones, specifically, and wifi-clouds of ionizing radiation, generally.

The folks in charge are stonewalling and hedging as hard as they can to cover this up:

I still don’t think you can call it a trend, because you really need more than two data points to call something a trend,

If you’ve been following this thread, you can see how the picture is becoming clearer, as I’m continuing to analyze it.

What do you think is going to happen to the folks in charge, when the populace fully grasps the enormity of the deception, and the deadly intent of those implementing it?

I think that, much sooner than later, we’re going to turn the corner and leave these people behind, forever.

This will be the end of them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 3, 2009 – the total mortality rate from unintentional injury increased in the US by 11 percent from 1999-2005, far larger increases were seen in some subgroups analyzed by researchers. Their analysis found that white women between 45 and 64 years old experienced a 230 percent increase in the rate of poisoning mortality over the study period. White men in this age group experienced an increase of 137 percent.

 

April 18, 2012 – Deaths caused by unintentional injuries decreased by 29% in children younger than 19 years from 2000 to 2009, according to this month’s Vital Signs report from CDC. According to the agency’s findings, which were also published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, rates for individual causes of injuries dropped nearly across the board—one exception, however, was poisonings. Overall, poisoning deaths increased by 80%, largely due to prescription drug overdoses.

The most common cause of death from unintentional injury among children was motor vehicle crashes; other leading causes included suffocation, drowning, poisoning, fires, and falls. Suffocation rates increased in the past decade by 30%, while vehicle crashes, drownings, fires, and falls declined by 41%, 28%, 45%, and 19%, respectively.

CDC noted a particular trend in poisoning deaths among older teenagers aged 15 years to 19 years—the death rate increased by more than 90% in this population. Poisoning deaths associated with prescription drugs for children aged 15 years to 19 years increased from 30% in 2000 to 57% in 2009. The agency called for “appropriate prescribing, proper storage and disposal, discouraging medication sharing, and state-based prescription drug monitoring programs” to address this trend

 

April 21, 2016 – U.S. Suicide Rate Surges to a 30-Year High – The New York Times

 

December 13, 2016 – Drug use by U.S. teens drops to all-time low

 

December 16, 2017 – Teen Depression, Suicide Linked To Time Spent On Phones …

 

December 21, 2017 – US life expectancy drops for second year in a row

Life expectancy in the United States has dropped again following last year’s decline, which marked the first downturn in more than two decades.

On average, Americans can now expect to live 78.6 years, a statistically significant drop of 0.1 year, according to a report on 2016 data published Thursday by the National Center for Health Statistics. Women can now expect to live a full five years longer than men: 81.1 years vs. 76.1 years.

The last time the agency recorded a multiyear drop was in 1962 and 1963.

I still don’t think you can call it a trend, because you really need more than two data points to call something a trend,” said Bob Anderson, chief of the mortality statistics branch at the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “But it’s certainly concerning to see this two years in a row.”

Anderson said he is particularly concerned about drug overdose deaths, most of which are opioid-related.

We have data for almost half of 2017 at this point. It’s still quite provisional, but it suggests that we’re in for another increase” in drug-related deaths, he said. “If we’re not careful, we could end up with declining life expectancy for three years in a row, which we haven’t seen since the Spanish flu, 100 years ago.”

(Spanish Flu was an Op  – ed)

The 10 leading causes of death remain unchanged and now account for 74.1% of all deaths in the United States, according to the report. Age-adjusted death rates decreased for seven of the top 10 leading causes of death: heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, influenza and pneumonia, and kidney disease. The rates increased for unintentional injuries, Alzheimer’s disease and suicide.

(The following information is in a chart in the article)

Unintentional injuries, up 6.9%, 2014 to 2016

Alzheimer’s, up 4.9

Congenital malformations, up 3.1

Bacterial sepsis of newborn – up 1.2

Respiratory distress of newborn – up .9

Stroke, up .8

Disease of circulatory system, up .6

Suicide, up .5

Chronic lower respiratory disease, up .1

Diabetes, up .1

Kidney disease, down .1

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome – down .7

Neonatal Hemmorage, down 1

Influenza and pneumonia, down 1.5

Cord and placental complications, down 2.9.

Maternal complications, down 4.0

Low birth weight, down 5.1

Unintentional injuries include accidental drug overdoses, which were the official cause of 63,600 deaths last year.

“It just keeps going up and up and appears to be accelerating,” Anderson said.

“In the past, those increases have been more than completely offset by declines in cardiovascular mortality,” such as heart disease and stroke, he said. “What’s happened in recent years, since about 2010 or so, is a substantial slowdown in the rate of decline for cardiovascular mortality. It seems to be leveling off to some extent, and as a result, the drug overdose deaths are more prominent in the overall picture of mortality.”

(Implies it’s simply a matter of perspective – ed)

A country’s infant mortality rate (the number of births compared with the number of deaths of children under age 1) “is generally regarded as a good indicator of the overall health of a population,” according to the report. In the United States, this rate “changed from 589.5 infant deaths per 100,000 live births in 2015 to 587.0 in 2016, but this change was not statistically significant.”

 

July 18, 2018 – Itasca, IL — A total of 161,374 people died from unintentional, preventable injuries in 2016, making such incidents the third-leading cause of death in the United States for the first time, a National Safety Council data analysis shows.

NSC examined the data, published by the National Center for Health Statistics, and found that preventable injuries caused 14,803 more deaths in 2016 than in 2015. The 10 percent increase is the largest year-over-year percentage climb since 1936, while the 18.6 percent increase from 2014 is the largest two-year percentage since NSC began tracking the statistic in 1903.

(Where “climb” is warm, and hopeful, something one does intentionally, with aspiration – ed)

NSC researchers attribute the rise in unintentional deaths to the opioid crisis, a Jan. 17 press release states. Opioid-related deaths totaled 37,814 in 2016, compared with 29,382 in 2015.

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