Erie, PA’s all-time two day snow record was just broken by over thirty percent

“Crime is common. Logic is rare. Therefore it is upon the logic rather than upon the crime that you should dwell.”

Sherlock Holmes, from “The Adventure of the Copper Beeches”, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1892

 

 

 

It’s January, 2018 and the Great Artificial Drought has been broken by the slow, steady, widespread and ever-increasing distribution of simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices in the vicinity of the weather warfare infrastructure that many still mistakenly presume only carries cell phone traffic and weather radar data.

I’ve appended a story below to support that assertion, headlined “Record-setting Christmas storm buries Pennsylvania’s fourth largest city under more than 4 feet of snow.”

Wherein they’ve described 58 inches as “more than four feet“. That’s technically correct, of course, but, at just two inches under five feet, from a journalistic perspective it would it is correct to say “almost five feet” in the headline, versus the duplicitous “more than four feet“, which is hedging as hard as it can.

In the article we go on to read that “According to the National Weather Service, Erie received 34 inches on Christmas Day, easily topping its previous 24-hour snowfall record. After another 24 inches piled up from midnight through 5 p.m. Tuesday, the National Weather Service said Erie had broken Pennsylvania’s previous all-time two-day state snowfall record, set in 1958 when Morgantown received 44 inches.

Can you see how they listed 24 and 34 inches separately, but didn’t put “58 inches” in this paragraph? That’s intentional – they did it so the reader’s subconscious doesn’t get to see the big number in this context. And did you notice that they gave you the numbers, but wouldn’t document the percentage increase between the old record and the new, as that would be much more impactful? So I had to do the math.

44 inches to 58 inches is a 32% percent increase. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

Instead of giving you the percentage, and saying “almost a third more than the previous record”, they retreat all the way back to “easily topping.”

The statistics I’ve given are specific. Whereas the verbiage used in the article is general, a hallmark of propaganda. And “topping” implies “just going over the top of”, vs. “crushing by a 30% margin.”

Top: exceed (an amount, level, or number); be more than.”

It means “be more than”, with no descriptor as to “by how much”.

Here’s the Mayor of Erie on the situation:

The last two decades we haven’t had as much snow as we used to have in the 70s,” Sinnott said. “Although we have had snow, not like this, so people are not used to it.”

He’s being cagey with “last two decades“, because they haven’t had snow like this ever in history. That tactic is called “compartmentalization.” He chopped it up into a smaller chunk, took your eye off that larger ball. The previous record was set in 1958. What’s that got to do with “the seventies”, or “the last two decades”? Nothing, I’ve caught him out.

As any tired reader of this thread knows, iI’s work to break down these tactics, just as it’s careful, assiduous work for the people who write these articles to keep at it in such a systematic way. Which is one of the things that I believe makes this thread valuable – documentation of the ongoing, careful, conspiratorial effort of a globally-linked few to control the many.

Social engineering by our wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments has engendered a populace that doesn’t notice – consciously, anyway – that a third more snow than anyone’s ever seen in history has just fallen, or, further, that such a thing should not be possible given that we’ve purportedly just finished the two hottest years in the planet’s history.

The latter is, of course, a gigantic, baldfaced lie. Would you want your entire strategic future to be based on a gigantic, baldfaced lie? I wouldn’t.

These vile con artists are at the end of their road, because awareness of the simple truths I’m elucidating here might be held back for a bit, but cannot be held back forever.

 

 

December 26, 2017 – Record-setting Christmas storm buries Pennsylvania’s fourth largest city under more than 4 feet of snow

Lake-effect snow buried Pennsylvania’s fourth largest city under more than four feet of snow over Christmas, smashing both local and state snowfall records while hampering holiday travel around the Great Lakes.

With snow falling at a rate of up to three inches per hour, the National Weather Service reported Erie, Pa., picked up at least 58 inches of snow since the storm began on Christmas Eve. The bulk of that fell in a 30-hour period from Christmas morning into Tuesday.

Erie officials have declared a state of emergency and are pleading with motorists to stay off city streets and nearby highways, including Interstates 90 and 79. Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf (D) was also expected to call up some national guardsmen because so much snow has fallen there is concern ambulances will not able to reach some patients.

“They don’t have vehicles high enough, so we are currently working with the national guard to be able to deploy Humvee ambulances to assist them,” said Richard D. Flinn, the secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Emergency Management. “We will also provide the state police with Humvees in case they need it.”

According to the National Weather Service, Erie received 34 inches on Christmas Day, easily topping its previous 24-hour snowfall record. After another 24 inches piled up from midnight through 5 p.m. Tuesday, the National Weather Service said Erie had broken Pennsylvania’s previous all-time two-day state snowfall record, set in 1958 when Morgantown received 44 inches.

In an interview, Erie Mayor Joseph E. Sinnott (D) said the snow is so deep cars have been “bottoming out” in it.

The last two decades we haven’t had as much snow as we used to have in the 70s,” Sinnott said. “Although we have had snow, not like this, so people are not used to it. . . . We managed to keep the main streets as clear as possible, but the side streets are very deep, and even the SUVs are having trouble.”

Despite whiteout conditions at times, travel around Erie was complicated by residents who tried to press ahead with their Christmas plans.

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