Awareness of the Rising Female Death Rate is, Well, Rising

 

“Doublethink is the acceptance of or mental capacity to accept contrary opinions or beliefs at the same time, especially as a result of political indoctrination.”

George Orwell, from “1984”

 

 

 

March 14, 2016 – ‘Hey Siri, I’m Depressed’: Can Smartphones Answer the Call for Help?

September 16, 2017 – Rise in teen suicide, social media coincide; is there link? – ABC News

November 14, 2017 – the suicide rate for girls aged 13-18 increased by 65 percent between 2010 and 2015, and the number of girls experiencing so-called suicide-related outcomes — feeling hopeless, thinking about suicide, planning for suicide or attempting suicide — rose by 12 percent. The number of teen girls reporting symptoms of severe depression increased by 58 percent.

November 14, 2017 – Researchers think cell phones might help prevent suicides | Around

November 14, 2017 – Increased Hours Online Correlate With An Uptick In Teen Depression, Suicidal Thoughts

(Uptick: up·tick /ˈəptik/ noun – a small increase. – ed)

 

 

 

 

 

 

In that preceding set of quotes, you can see that the folks in charge are not your friends, and are lying to you about basically everything, including how electronic devices drastically increase the suicide and depression rates among their users. You can see how roughly 60 percent increases in suicide and depression are defined as “small”. And how they’ll allow the “Uptick” is said to be in “teen depression and suicidal thoughts.” See how “thoughts” hedges, and implies they thought about it, but then didn’t go ahead and do it?

The repugnant meme word “uptick” is used again here:

“… cell phones and tablets — might have contributed to a recent uptick in symptoms of depression and suicide-related behaviors and thoughts in American young people, especially girls.”

They hedge blatantly by saying “suicide-related behaviors and thoughts.” Two layers. With “might have contributed” a third layer.

It only took twenty years or to go from the general distribution of cellular phones to what I and others have called “Peak Smartphone”, when the sick tide crested and began to draw back. It looks like that signal moment in human history can be dated as mid-2017, or perhaps August 2017.

I’m basing that on headlines like this one:

“August 3, 2017 – Smartphones making teens isolated, immature, suicidal”

One of the reasons that people are giving the literally deadly devices up is rising awareness:

“The researchers returned to the data and looked to see if there was a statistical correlation between screen-time and depressive symptoms and suicide-related outcomes. They found that 48 percent of teens who spent five or more hours per day on electronic devices reported at least one suicide-related outcome, compared to only 28 percent of those who spent less than an hour a day on devices.”

Can you see how they carefully avoid tracking suicide-related outcome for those who don’t use electronic devices, at all? That’s careful hedging.

The so-called “Smart” phone, which moniker will, in the near future, ring with horrible irony (sorry for that pun), lasting roughly let’s ten years from invention to rejection.

You can see in one of the articles I’ve appended below that the folks in charge are wildly terrified that we’ll abandon the obviously-deadly technology altogether:

“On the positive side, the researchers found that spending time away from screen and engaging in in-person social interaction, sports and exercise, doing homework, attending religious services, etc., was linked to having fewer depressive symptoms and suicide-related outcomes.”

O.k., that’s great, fewer.

Here’s another:

“The good news? You don’t have to totally give up on electronic devices to lower your risk for depression and suicide-relayed outcomes. Twenge said that limiting screen-time to one or two hours per day would statistically fall into the safe zone for device usage.”

Did I mention that, in the past month, they’ve lost Catalonia, and Zimbabwe?

 

 

 

 

 

September 14, 2014 – India – Rebuked for using mobile phones, two girls commit suicide

Two teenaged girls committed suicide after their hostel superintendent and parents rebuked them for using mobile phones, police said

 

August 3, 2017 – Smartphones making teens isolated, immature, suicidal – Axios

 

September 9, 2017 – Teen Girls With Smartphones Flirt Most With Depression and Suicide

 

November 14, 2017 – Screen time might boost depression, suicide behaviors in teens

Increased time spent in front of a screen — in the form of computers, cell phones and tablets — might have contributed to a recent uptick in symptoms of depression and suicide-related behaviors and thoughts in American young people, especially girls.

(Uptick – small increase. – ed)

A new study finds that teens, especially girls, who spend several hours per day on phones and tablets are more likely to be depressed and have suicide-related outcomes.

They found that the suicide rate for girls aged 13-18 increased by 65 percent between 2010 and 2015, and the number of girls experiencing so-called suicide-related outcomes — feeling hopeless, thinking about suicide, planning for suicide or attempting suicide — rose by 12 percent. The number of teen girls reporting symptoms of severe depression increased by 58 percent.

“When I first saw these sudden increases in mental health issues, I wasn’t sure what was causing them,” said Twenge, author of iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy — And Completely Unprepared for Adulthood.

“But these same surveys ask teens how they spend their leisure time, and between 2010 and 2015, teens increasingly spent more time with screens and less time on other activities. That was by far the largest change in their lives during this five-year period, and it’s not a good formula for mental health.”

The researchers returned to the data and looked to see if there was a statistical correlation between screen-time and depressive symptoms and suicide-related outcomes. They found that 48 percent of teens who spent five or more hours per day on electronic devices reported at least one suicide-related outcomecompared to only 28 percent of those who spent less than an hour a day on devices. Depressive symptoms were more common in teens who spent a lot of time on their devices, as well.

The findings fit with previous studies that have linked spending more time on social media to unhappiness.

On the positive side, the researchers found that spending time away from screen and engaging in in-person social interaction, sports and exercise, doing homework, attending religious services, etc., was linked to having fewer depressive symptoms and suicide-related outcomes.

The researchers reported their findings today in the journal Clinical Psychological Science.

While economic struggles are generally thought to be linked to depression and suicide, the U.S. economy was improving between 2010 and 2015, so that is unlikely to be the primary driver of these increases, Twenge noted.

“Although we can’t say for sure that the growing use of smartphones caused the increase in mental health issues, that was by far the biggest change in teens’ lives between 2010 and 2015,” she said.

The good news? You don’t have to totally give up on electronic devices to lower your risk for depression and suicide-relayed outcomes. Twenge said that limiting screen-time to one or two hours per day would statistically fall into the safe zone for device usage.

 

November 14, 2017 – Increased Hours Online Correlate With An Uptick In Teen Depression, Suicidal Thoughts

 

November 14, 2017 – Researchers think cell phones might help prevent suicides | Around …

New studies by the UO Center for Digital Mental Health hope to not only harvest personal data gleaned from cell phones and use it for good, they also aim to prevent suicide attempts in adolescents by identifying a crisis window when help can be offered at just the right moment.

 

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