Record bird populations, across the globe

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It’s September, 2017, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime. In response, what we euphemistically call “Secret Agents” are engaged in ongoing animal-killing operations in an attempt to prop up the failing and wholly-fraudulent “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying” confidence game on behalf of the barely-closeted Death worshippers they work for.

That’s why a story below from Ireland is headlined “Record number of birds of prey were poisoned last year.”

An Illuminist-shill talking head quoted in an article about record numbers of migrating birds in Scotland says “it wasn’t a huge surprise” in regard to almost twice as many Black-tailed godwits showing up as ever, in history, and then hedged again on the back end with  “Hopefully they will enjoy a good breeding season this year.” Wait, what? They’ve obviously just come off the most successful breeding season in all history…why the seed of doubt? Because he’s privately hoping that some barely-covert Godwit-killing op can bring things back into trim in the Death Cult game he plays in.

The article says “The majority of the birds this year were found in a tiny field in Kilmoluaig“, using “tiny field” to make your mind think the doubling of the populations is still no big deal. A doubling over the previous record is defined with a powerful negative hedge as an “increasing number“.

In another article, we learn that “Canada’s endangered whooping crane population appears to be on the rebound, with Wood Buffalo National Park reporting a record high number of fledglings this year. At 63 new birds, this number beats the previous record set in 2006 of 49 birds.”

Can you see how they hedged with the word “appears“, to bewilder and ensheeple you? Can you see how they carefully avoided printing the percentage increase of the whooping cranes, because printing it would be more impactful, and go seriously off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all? I had to do the math. The whooping crane fledgling record is 27 percent higher than the old, set in 2009. What’s the variable, why are they doing so well?

Irwin says this year’s number of fledglings is particularly high probably because of the large juvenile population born between 2010 and 2012.”

Okay, so why did the birds do so well between 2010 and 2012? No mention of the positive environmental drivers, it’s verboten. No mention of it mapping against record bird populations across the globe. Verboten.

The article continues to let us know “species productivity — a measure of new chicks per population size — was much larger than average.” They carefully inserted “a measure of new chicks per population size” in there so the money sentence would be broken up. Read it without the hedging cut in the middle:

“Species productivity was much larger than average.” That’s much stronger. They deliberately cut it up to hedge, to ensheeple, to bewilder.

Another article from Bermuda tell us that “The 2017 Cahow nesting season saw the nesting population increase to a record number of 117 established breeding pairs.” Only they carefully omit telling you what the old record was, at all, so you have no idea how significant the increase is.

Mum’s the word, you see – the “biggest secret” is the breaking, dismantling and transformation of the great, global Death Energy matrix, brought down by simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices, much to Controlled-Opposition mouthpiece David Icke’s chagrin.

And the broader realization of the simple truths I’m elucidating is what is going to bring about the downfall of the barely-closeted cult of genetically-related, literally blood-drinking miscreants who have been ruling us from the shadows all the way back to Babylon, and before.

 

 

 

 

November 16, 2016 – Record number of birds of prey were poisoned last year – The Irish Times

 

December 25, 2016 – Record numbers observed in Harlan County Christmas Bird Count …

 

January 11, 2017 – Virginia Peregrine Falcon population reaches record number

 

February 13, 2017 – New record for overwintering birds, but Spain’s wetlands are suffering

 

March 3, 2017 – US Bank Stadium Is Killing Record Numbers of Birds, Just as Experts Feared

 

May 1, 2017 – Island sees record number of migrating birds

Tiree in Scotland sees increasing number of black-tailed godwits

A record-breaking number of migrating birds have been recorded on Tiree this year.
The RSPB said 2,270 black-tailed godwits spent time on the island this Spring, almost double the previous record of 1,320 in 2013.

The majority of the birds this year were found in a tiny field in Kilmoluaig. Godwits often stop off in the Hebrides to refuel during their migration to Iceland, where they breed. Spotters identified some of the birds as having come from France, Portugal and Spain due to the rings fitted on their legs.

John Bowler, Tiree officer for RSPB Scotland, said: “Black-tailed godwits are known to stop off here for food on their way to Iceland, particularly when adverse northerly winds hamper their progress across the North Atlantic.

“So, with huge numbers of golden plover already noted on Tiree during pretty windy conditions, it wasn’t a huge surprise when black-tailed godwits started turning up, too. However, to see flocks of this size is just incredible.

Hopefully they will enjoy a good breeding season this year and I’m already looking forward to seeing them pass back through Tiree in the autumn.”

 

July 5, 2017 – Record-setting numbers of breeding bald eagles now in NY state …

 

July 16, 2017 – Bermuda – Record Number Of Cahow Chicks Fledge

The 2017 Cahow nesting season saw the nesting population increase to a record number of 117 established breeding pairs [those that produced an egg, whether it hatched or not]. In addition, a record number of 61 chicks successfully fledged out to sea [the first time the number of fledged chicks has exceeded 60].

In parallel the Nonsuch Expeditions CahowCam, in part due to its new partnership with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology saw a jump to 8.5 million minutes of video being watched by scientists, students and followers from around the world. [see www.nonsuchisland.com]

The following update was compiled by Jeremy Madeiros, Cahow Recovery Project Manager, Senior Terrestrial Conservation Officer, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Bermuda Government

 

July 24, 2017 – Record number of birds visiting new haven on Wallasea Island

Two years on from the completion of Jubilee Marsh on Wallasea Island, the RSPB is celebrating record numbers of birds using the Essex nature reserve.

The creation of Jubilee Marsh was made possible thanks to a unique partnership with Crossrail, Europe’s biggest construction project and the UK’s largest conservation charity, the RSPB.

Crossrail donated over 3 million tonnes of material excavated during construction of the new railway deep below the capital to re-create a previously lost wetland twice the size the City of London on Wallasea Island in Essex.

And now, only two years after the work was completed and the sea wall breached to create the new wetland, the wildlife making its home on the Island is reaching record numbers.

Rachel Fancy, Wallasea Island Warden, commented: “Wallasea Island is an incredibly special place, but the numbers that we are seeing on the reserve from last winter and into this season are set to break all records! The highest count of wintering birds ever recorded has now reached 12,000, meaning that the reserve is becoming a haven for wintering birds. The mud is holding increasing amounts of food for them to feed on.”
August 1, 2017 – Vermont Spring Turkey Hunting Record Set | Realtree
August 2, 2017 – Record numbers of Sanderlings on remote Wadden Sea island

Emma Penning reports that currently (1 August 2017) over 21,000 Sanderlings roost on the Wadden Sea islet Griend, on sand banks actively created to allow Griend to “wander” again. This is twice the Dutch wintering population (ca. 9,000), and as high as the British wintering population of 20,500 birds (Reneerkens et al. 2009). As much as 10.5% of the flyway population is now on Griend (van Roomen et al. 2015). A record number of Sanderling on a single roost!

Griend is a small uninhabited island in the middle of the Dutch Wadden Sea. Natural erosion processes would make this type of islet “wander” through the Wadden Sea, but the protecting sand dyke created decades ago had washed away. In the summer of 2016, sand and shells have been resupplied so that natural processes can take their course again. At the same time vegetation cover on the island has been removed to ensure breeding habitat for terns and gulls. The new very low and 400 m wide sand bank protects against erosion from the west, and “feeds” the island with sand to stimulate growth at the north and south sides. This sand bar apparently is an attractive feature for Sanderling.

 
August 18, 2017 – Wood Buffalo National Park reports record number of whooping crane fledglings

Conservation managers at the park reported 63 new fledglings of the endangered bird this year.

Canada’s endangered whooping crane population appears to be on the rebound, with Wood Buffalo National Park reporting a record high number of fledglings this year. At 63 new birds, this number beats the previous record set in 2006 of 49 birds.

“We were hoping for big numbers after we counted 98 nests this spring,” says Sharon Irwin, a resource conservation manager at the park. “It’s quite a jump from last year.”

Not only are there more fledglings this year, but the species productivity — a measure of new chicks per population size — was much larger than average. Four pairs of twins were also found — an exceptionally high number.

Irwin says this year’s number of fledglings is particularly high probably because of the large juvenile population born between 2010 and 2012. Those individuals have now reached breeding age and started their own nests. “You get years where we have fewer nests or fewer fledglings, but it definitely has been a steady upward climb,” she says.

In the spring, researchers do aerial surveys of the whooping crane’s habitat and make note of where nesting sites are found. Later in the summer, they survey the sites again and count the number of new fledglings.

The whooping crane was listed as endangered under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) in 2003, after decades of habitat loss and over-hunting had decimated their population. In the 1940s, their global population had dropped to just 21 individuals. Irwin estimates the Wood Buffalo National Park population – the only naturally wild population – has now climbed to over 400 individuals. In the fall, the whooping cranes will migrate south to Aransas Wildlife Refuge in Texas.

SARA’s long term recovery goal is to establish 1,000 whooping cranes by 2035. “There’s still a ways to go, but we’re definitely getting closer to numbers that will save them from disaster,” says Irwin.

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