“co·in·ci·dence – a remarkable concurrence of events or circumstances without apparent causal connection.”

co·in·ci·dence – kōˈinsədəns/

noun – a remarkable concurrence of events or circumstances without apparent causal connection.

Urban Dictionary  – Coincidence Theorist

noun – someone who believes what the mainstream media and government tell them, without questioning it for themselves.

 

 

 

 

It’s August, 2017, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime. Since that statement directly contradicts our State Religion, which holds that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind”, I’ve appended multiple recent examples below to support it.

They all involve record-breaking fish catches. Here, the word record means “largest ever in history.” That’s quite an achievement, when Poor Mother Gaia is well-known to being doing so, well, poorly, don’t you think?

The first story documents the old and new records, but does not tell you the percentage, as that would be more impactful, and go seriously off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. It’s 3.2% larger than the previous record.

Oh, and the old record stood for almost 34 years. Hey, wait, wasn’t Mother Gaia doing way better, 34 years ago? I thought she was dying, right about now?

The story from August 16 documents the old and new records. However, it first takes care to say, inexactly, that the new record beat the old by “more than six pounds”. Then It gives you the numbers, but does not tell you the percentage, as that would be more impactful, and go seriously off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. The new record is 17.7% larger than the old. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

And not to give that article too much credit for providing you with the previous record. Here’s the defensive spin: – “While records of other more common sportfish have remained unbroken for years, the recent surge in drum records indicates freshwater drum are gaining popularity with New York anglers,” DEC said.

So we are to believe that more records are being set because anglers are casting for them more frequently. That is, of course, the tirelessly-employed “increased awareness” canard.

Then, continuing to throw stuff against the wall to see what sticks, the article then bravely alleges “This growth is likely due to their ability to effectively forage on the abundant invasive quagga and/or zebra mussels found in these waters.” Wait, what, likely? It is, or it isn’t. And you’re telling me that freshwater drum fish break open and eat mussels? That doesn’t even sound plausible. But, let’s just say that they do.

The rest of the stories in this post don’t mention a thing about mussel-gorging record-breakers. That’s because the merely likely, trial-balloon “invasive mussels” suggestion is a meme, a plausible-deniability excuse, designed to give your subconscious something local to attribute the historically-unprecedented trend to – to keep your eyes off the larger phenomenon I’m documenting here.

Going back on-form, that article mentions another state record, and provides a link, but carefully omits the old record: “The latest state record is the second one established this year. Eric Scordo, of Watertown, broke the channel catfish record with a 35-pound, 3-ounce fish he caught in Lake Ontario on April 29.

The story the link takes you to is the May 5 one, below. It does document both the old and new records. However – like every last one of the others, -it takes care to not tell you the percentage of the increase, as that would be more impactful, and go seriously off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. The new record is 7.3% larger than the old. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

The last story, from Colorado, carefully omits the old record, but has to cough up that it stood for 27 years. Hey, wait, wasn’t Mother Gaia doing way better, 27 years ago? I thought she was dying, right about now?

Precisely identical tactics, down over time, in different geographical areas. Stone-cold proof of, yes, a Conspiracy – unless one has been overtaken by the passion of the Coincidence Theorist.

 

 

 

March 5, 2017 – Fisher’s Tennessee catch is set to be new state record

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Steven Paul made a great catch, and it’s pending as a state record.

According to the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Paul was fishing on Melton Hill Reservoir outside of Knoxville Thursday when he caught a 43-pound, 14-ounce muskellunge.

It measured as 51 3/8 inches in length and 23 1/2 inches in girth.

Paul said the fish died in his net, which prompted him to weigh it.

Kyle F. Edwards held the prior record for almost 34 years with his 42-pound, 8-ounce muskellunge.

Reeling in the record was no small feat.

“[Muskellunges] put on a remarkable fight, once hooked, and are typically very difficult to catch,” Reservoirs Fisheries biologist John Hammonds explained. “A musky over 50 inches in length is extremely difficult to hook and land and is considered to be a ‘fish of a lifetime’ for most musky anglers.”

The fish will officially become a new state record once TWRA officials in Nashville certify the paperwork

(story makes no mention of the previous record – ed)

 

 

May 5, 2017 – UPDATE: The state Department of Evironmental Conservation on May 5 officially confirmed that Eric B. Scordo’s fish is a new state record.

CHAUMONT, N.Y. – a Watertown charter boat captain reeled in a monster channel catfish while fishing on Lake Ontario Friday – a fish that appears to have smashed the state record.

Eric B. Scordo caught the fish near Chaumont. The 35-pound, 2.5-ounce lunker was weighed at the Chaumont Hardware store. It measured 40 inches.

“It was a dream for me; it’s what I always wanted,” he told the Watertown Times. He caught the fish using a nightcrawler as bait.

A state Department of Environmental Conservation staffer examined the catch Monday. Scordo said the Chaumont Bay Marina, helped out, offering use of its bait tank to hold the fish until the final measurements could be taken.

The current state record for a channel catfish is 32 pounds, 12 ounces. It was set by Chris Dixon in June 2002 on Brant Lake in Warren County.

Scordo, who operates NNY Catfish Hunter Charters, said the fish put up quite a fight.

“When they get a sense that they’re going to be caught or put in a boat, they’ll take right off and run. They are strong, they’re like sharks, they’ll rip your drag right off your reel,” he told the Watertown Times.  “Until you tire them out, they’re a hell of a fish to get in the net.”

 

 

August 16, 2017 – Oneida Lake angler smashes state record for sheepshead by 6 pounds

A 36-pound sheepshead (freshwater drum) caught by an Oneida Lake angler smashed the state record for the fish species by more than six pounds, the state Department of Environmental Conservation said.

The angler, Jason Bair, of Macedon in Wayne County, landed the 42.75-inch fish on June 16. He caught it using a Rapala Jigging Rap.

Bair took the record away from Ameila Whalen, of Witherbee, whose 29-pound, 14-ounce fish was caught last year in Lake Champlain in Essex County.

His fish mark’s the fourth state freshwater fishing record sheepshead caught in the state since 2005. In its records, the DEC lists the fish as a freshwater drum.

“While records of other more common sportfish have remained unbroken for years, the recent surge in drum records indicates freshwater drum are gaining popularity with New York anglers,” DEC said. “It also appears that drum are growing to much larger sizes than they ever have in many New York waters. This growth is likely due to their ability to effectively forage on the abundant invasive quagga and/or zebra mussels found in these waters.”

The latest state record is the second one established this year. Eric Scordo, of Watertown, broke the channel catfish record with a 35-pound, 3-ounce fish he caught in Lake Ontario on April 29.

 

 

 

August 24, 2017 – Colorado – New state record fish caught in Windsor

After 27 years, the state record for black crappie has been broken!

 The new state record black crappie, caught in Windsor’s Frank State Wildlife Area.

Fesstus Stalder of Greeley caught the fish, which weighed in at a record-breaking 3 pounds, 7.84 ounces, and 17.472 inches in length, at the Frank Easement West Pond, in the Frank State Wildlife Area (http://poudreheritage.org/locations/frank-state-wildlife-area/) in Windsor

(article makes no mention of the old record – ed)

 

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