“If there were Some Big Conspiracy, someone would notice, someone would speak up.”

 

 

“We control matter because we control the mind. Reality is inside the skull.”

O’Brien, from “1984” by George Orwell, 1949

 

 

 

 

It’s May, 2018, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime. Since that statement directly refutes our State Religion, which holds that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind”, I’ve appended two current examples below to support it.

One story below from last week, from Indiana, is headlined “Indiana state record lake whitefish falls again.”

Where “fall” has a negative connotation; a child falls down and cries, the stock market falls.

That story says “It bested the previous record, caught by Alexander Ciesielski in 2017, by nearly a half-pound.”

In that story, they gave you the new record, but carefully obfuscated the old as a standard protocol within the news blackout surrounding the subject. “By nearly half a pound” deliberately muddies the water, and there’s certainly no mention of the percentage difference between the records.

I had to dig for a separate story about the previous record to learn that it was 5 pounds, 9 ounces.

That’s an 11.2% increase over the old record, set just over a year ago. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

While another story below from the very same day, from Vermont, is headlined “Redhorse sucker fish record tumbles in Vermont”. Where, precisely as falls does in the first example, “tumble” also has a negative connotation; a child tumbles and cries, the stock market tumbles.

That story says “The 10.8-pound bottom feeder beat last year’s catch by nearly a pound.” You can see how they said “last year’s catch”, instead of “last year’s record”, to soften the impact of the statement. Always hedging, stonewalling, defraying.

In that story, precisely as in the first, they gave you the new record, but carefully obfuscated the old as a standard protocol within the news blackout surrounding the subject. “By nearly a pound” deliberately muddies the water, and there’s certainly no mention of the percentage difference between the records.

In precisely the same way as in the first example, I had to dig for a separate story about the previous record to learn that it was 9.96 pounds.

That’s an 8.4% increase over the old record, set just over a year ago. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

 

If there were Some Big Conspiracy, someone would notice, someone would speak up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 2, 2018 – Indiana state record lake whitefish falls again

Friday the 13th proved lucky for a Crown Point angler who broke the record for biggest lake whitefish caught in Indiana.

(Not tons of huge fish, just lucky – ed)

Dustin Meeter landed his 6-pound, 3-ounce lake whitefish on Lake Michigan near Burns Harbor in Portage on Friday, April 13. The fish measured 25.5 inches long.

Meeter’s fish marks the sixth record lake whitefish since the state established a category for the species in 2012. It bested the previous record, caught by Alexander Ciesielski in 2017, by nearly a half-pound.

(“Bested” implies “just exceeded”, carefully hedging as they describe an 11% increase. They gave you the new record, but carefully obfuscated the old record as a standard protocol within the news blackout surrounding the subject. “By nearly half a pound” muddies the water, and there’s certainly no mention of the percentage difference between the records.

Every article I located used the same verbiage. I had to dig for a separate story about the previous record, to learn that it was 5 pounds, 9 ounces. That’s an 11.2% increase over the old record, set just over a year ago. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

Can you see how the state established a category for the species for the first time in 2012? That’s an example of official Gerrymandering, attempting to further cloud the picture. 2012 is the year the great positive changes under discussion here got underway in earnest. – ed)

 

 

 

May 2, 2018 – Redhorse sucker fish record tumbles in Vermont

Michael Elwood expected redhorse suckers to be feeding in the lower Winooski River last week — but the seasoned Burlington angler hadn’t counted on hooking a record-breaker for the second year running.

(Implies he doesn’t think there are a lot of big fish out there – ed)

The 10.8-pound bottom feeder beat last year’s catch by nearly a pound.

“That river is loaded with big fish, and March and April is the time to get down there,” Elwood explained. “I know when the redhorse suckers are in there.”

(He obviously thinks there are lots of big fish in there. Their previous description of his point of view is wholly false, pure doublespeak – ed)

“There,” in this case, is a quiet stretch of the river near the Heineberg Bridge that connects Burlington with Colchester.

On April 24, Elwood, an electrician at St. Michael’s College, took a day off work with his supervisor and friend to go fishing.

“It was a nice day,” Elwood explained. “I’m not a stay-inside guy.”

Fresh out of the water, the redhorse sucker weighed more than 11 pounds but lost moisture (and weight) en route to the nearest weigh station, he said.

Dehydration did nothing to diminish Elwood’s bragging rights.

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