It’s April, 2018, and the Great Artificial Drought has been broken.

     

“You know my method. It is founded upon the observation of trifles.”

Sherlock Holmes, from “The Boscombe Valley Mystery”, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1891

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s April, 2018, and the Great Artificial Drought has been broken by the slow, steady, widespread and ever-increasing distribution of simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices in the vicinity of the weather warfare infrastructure that many still mistakenly presume only carries cell phone traffic and weather radar data.

The Great Artificial Drought got going when I was in High School. I was a lifeguard during the summer at a pool in my hometown, and we spent all day outside, every day. It started in the Summer of 1981.

That was right around the time the first microwave relay tower got built up on top of South Mountain, the 1,000 foot ridge bordering town.

It snowed a lot in Emmaus, PA when I was young. It started to snow less and less, every year, through my late childhood. But “the drought, the drought” hit the media in ’81, usually on the radio. By the early 1990’s, the rivers were all low, with a lot of stones showing where you could never see them before. And it got worse and worse all the way until four or five years ago.

In the story that I’ve appended below from Central New York, they tell you the numbers of the old and new records, but, obeying a standard guideline within the global news blackout surrounding the subject, they carefully hedge by omitting the percentage increase between them, as providing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. That’s 36% above the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

In the story below from Louisville, they tell you the numbers of the old and new record, but, obeying a standard guideline within the global news blackout surrounding the subject, they carefully hedge by omitting the percentage increase between them, as providing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. That’s 8% above the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

You’ll also notice that they use the ruse of “we rushed to press” to obfuscate the much-greater number of 8.4 inches that had fallen by 11 a.m. the next day. There’s no mention of where that number falls in the record books. That’s 4.7 more inches of snow from Tuesday to Wednesday, carefully obfuscated and, in journalistic parlance, “buried” down in the story as best they could.

In the story below from Indianapolis, they tell you the numbers of the old and new records, but, obeying a standard guideline within the global news blackout surrounding the subject, they carefully hedge by omitting the percentage increase between them, as providing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. That’s 64% above the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. And the old record is just from 2014, the year the great, epochal positive changes that are occurring at this time got underway in earnest.

 

 

 

 

 

March 2, 2018 – Record-breaking snow in Central NY makes today the snowiest day of the winter

Today’s snowfall in Central New York was not only back-breaking, it was record-breaking.

The official snow total at Hancock International Airport was 16.7 inches.

Here’s how that stacks up:

It breaks the record for March 2, which had been 12.2 inches, set in 1947.

 

March 21 ,2018 – Winter isn’t going down without a fight. Last night’s snowfall broke Louisville records

Winter isn’t going down without a fight.

Louisville had the snowiest March 20 and snowiest March 21 on record, according to Zach Taylor with the National Weather Service.

Tuesday’s snowfall capped off at 3.7 inches at midnight, beating out the previously snowiest first day of spring from 1996 at 3.4 inches.

(“beating out” implies a narrow margin, deliberate hedging, downplaying – ed)

At 7 a.m. Wednesday, Louisville had more than an inch of snow. That also crushed the snowiest day on record for March 21 back in 1885.

(The general term “crushed” is used, but avoids the specific 8% increase over the old record. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. In the snowiest day record from 1885, they won’t tell you what the old record was, or what the percentage between them was. Once again, careful, deliberate obfuscation – ed)

As of 11 a.m., Louisville had 8.4 inches of snow since it started falling Tuesday afternoon.

 

March 25, 2018 – Look back at record breaking spring snow storm

It was an incredible start to a late March weekend.  Snow, snow and more snow fell on many Hoosiers, while others had nothing at all.

A band of snow was laid down extending nearly 1,000 miles and approximately 50 miles wide.

It was a narrow band! Some amazing snowfall numbers along the narrow band.  The highest amount was 1-mile northwest of Avon where over a foot of snow fell.

(The general “over a foot” is used. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda. In journalistic parlance, 12.6 inches is “buried” in a table below)

Indianapolis officially recorded 10.2″ of snow.  That smashes the previous record for March 24 – 6.2″ set in 2013.

(Generally describes it as “smashed“, but avoids using the specific 64% increase over the old record – ed)

This also ranks as the 2nd highest single day March snow since 1884.  We only trailed March 19, 1906 when 12.1″ of snow fell on the circle city.

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