The breaking of the Great Artificial Drought, continued: Rainfall in Texas was 325% above average in February, 2018

     

“My name is Sherlock Holmes. It is my business to know what other people do not know.”

From “The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle“, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1892

 

 

 

 

It’s April, 2018, and the Great Artificial Drought has been broken by the slow, steady, widespread and ever-increasing distribution of simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices in the vicinity of the weather warfare infrastructure that many still mistakenly presume only carries cell-phone traffic and weather radar data.

The controlled press is formulaic in its obfuscation of this great transformation. In one of the recent news accounts I’ve appended below, we read “Wednesday, Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport received 4.72 inches of rain, a record for the day.” Only, there’s no further mention of what the old record was, or when it was set, or how the old and new records compare to one another. That’s an example of what is called a “news blackout.”

The article goes on to say “That rain helped put February on top as the wettest February — 11.31 inches fell, on average we only see 2.66 inches of rain in the month.”

In that second example they again carefully obfuscate the old February record, and instead wave their hands and talk about the average, which makes the stunning increase less impactful.

But don’t you think it’s humorous and cheering beyond measure that citing rainfall for the month that was 325 percent above average is the fallback position for these scoundrels? Ah, mirth.

And did you notice that they gave you the numbers, but carefully omitted that percentage, as providing it would have been much more impactful? So I had to do the math. Faithful readers of this thread will recognize that as another standard protocol within the global news blackout surrounding this subject.

Another story tells us “Last month appears to be the wettest February in Arkansas since at least 1939 and preliminarily the wettest February since state averages began being tabulated in 1895.”

They’re slow-playing, and tap-dancing, and hemming, and hawing, to avoid saying “rainiest in history.” Can you see how they again use the meme word “wettest“, to avoid saying the word “rainiest”, which contains the word “rain”?

It might not be so impactful on one reading, but, if you follow this thread, you see the repetitive use of the term wettest, again and again, in news account after news account. It’s a careful, controlled effort, part of what is termed a “news blackout.”

Getting you to focus feverishly on Donald, I mean Hillary, I mean North Korea, I mean Russia, and getting you to slacken your jaw and breathe through your mouth in regard to rainfall and the environment is exactly, precisely the game, and I’ve made it my part time job here in this thread to help awaken the populace from the stupefying Black Magic spell which has been placed upon it.

A hundred years ago, people watched the weather, talked about the weather, knew about the weather. And they didn’t have the insane conception that rain was a bad thing. They knew that rainfall meant healthy crops, health for everyone.

We’re coming back to our senses, and the theses of this thread are not wild, nor tremendously conjectural. It takes a lot of energy to hold a lie together, while lies can be broken down by simple truths.

Please consider spreading the word, won’t you?

And, if you haven’t already done so, please consider distributing simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices where you live and work today, or sponsor a gifter near you, perhaps even through a vehicle such as this forum.

 

 

March 1, 2018 – Winter Rain Nearly Erases North Texas Drought

According to an updated drought map released by NOAA Thursday, recent rain has almost erased the drought in North Texas

DFW and areas east no longer have drought conditions. There was significant improvement to the west, where most areas are in the abnormally dry category.

The rain in February was record breaking.

Wednesday, Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport received 4.72 inches of rain, a record for the day.

That rain helped put February on top as the wettest February — 11.31 inches fell, on average we only see 2.66 inches of rain in the month.

The 2017-2018 winter season recorded 16.72 inches of rain, which ties the old record set in 1931-1932. An average winter sees 7.34 inches of rain.

(That’s 127% above average. They gave you the numbers, but, as part of the standard formula utilized in the global news blackout surrounding this subject, they carefully hedged by withholding the percentage increase between them. So I had to do the math. – ed)

North Texas will have a chance to dry out. Rain chances are slim over the next 10 days.

 

March 2, 2018 – February was wettest in Arkansas since at least 1939; lightning kills 25 cattle near Lonsdale

Last month appears to be the wettest February in Arkansas since at least 1939 and preliminarily the wettest February since state averages began being tabulated in 1895, according to the National Weather Service in North Little Rock.

 

March 29, 2017 – Seattle, WA – February + March rainfall breaks a record of 120 years!

A Pacific Northwest tradition continues: Staying green and cultivating mold​ and mushrooms.

After Monday’s soaking rain, the remaining days of March will be drier. Surprisingly, this month will not break a rainfall record — unless you add in February’s rainfall. When you do that, the total will break a record of 120 years!

As of 5 a.m. Monday, the precipitation total at Sea-Tac is 7.14″.

The wettest month of March on record will stay in the year 2014 with 9.44″ — and I’m sure we’re all hoping it stays there.

(2014- within the time period covered by this thread – ed)

February and March precipitation total, added together (as of Monday morning), is 15.65″, and that ranks this year as #1 wettest February plus March!

The second all time wettest February and March was 15.55″ in 2014.

Portland, Oregon has also had excessive rain and snow over the winter months. Starting with October 2016, precipitation came to 8.31″ which fell 0.10″ short of the record of 8.41″ in 1994.

Portland maximized rain this year collecting an all-time month of February record at 10.36″ of precipitation. Now March has accumulated 7.07″ of precipitation which is sliding into second place to the standing record of March 2012 with 7.89″. On Monday we might flop the total to number one.

 

 

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