Soybean yields in the U.S. set new records in a stair-step fashion each year between 2014 and 2016, and U.S. soybean stocks increased 234 percent from 2012 to 2017.

“You know my method. It is founded upon the observation of trifles.”

Sherlock Holmes, from “The Boscombe Valley Mystery“, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1891

 

 

 

 

October 20, 2017 – Record soybean yields? Not in my back yard | Farm Futures

I was ready to concede maybe USDA’s projected yields were real. Then we got into harvesting the later planted soybeans. If I had gotten around to writing this blog at the front end of the week, it would have been much different. I kept hearing rumors of record yields. I was about to give in and concede

 

January 2, 2018 – Soybeans: What’s Up with Record Yields, Especially in the Southeast …

Soybean yields in the U.S. have been very high the last 4 years. The U.S. average yield set new records in a stair-step fashion each year between 2014 and 2016.

 

January 17, 2018 – Can Monster Crop Yields Continue?

Since the drought year of 2012, corn ending stocks have increased more than 200 percent, and are projected at 2.5 billion bushels – the highest level since 1988. Soybean ending stocks have increased 234 percent over this span, and are projected at 470 million bushels – the highest level since 2007.

 

January 19, 2018 – Delaware Soybeans: Record Harvest in 2017 – AgFax

Delaware was one of nine states to break record high yields for soybeans with yields of 51 bushels per acre, up 22.9 percent from 2016

 

February 19, 2018 – Brazil’s soybean crop seen at record 115.6 mln T | Successful Farming

Brazil’s 2017/18 soybean crop is expected to reach 115.6 million tonnes, a record volume, 1.2 percent above the previous record last year of 114.2 million tonnes

 

 

 

 

 

It’s March, 2018, and the Great Artificial Drought has been broken by the slow, steady, widespread and ever-increasing distribution of Orgonite devices in the vicinity of the weather warfare infrastructure that many still mistakenly presume only carries cell phone traffic and weather radar data.

That’s why an article that I’ve appended below says “Since the drought year of 2012, corn ending stocks have increased more than 200 percent, and are projected at 2.5 billion bushels – the highest level since 1988. Soybean ending stocks have increased 234 percent over this span, and are projected at 470 million bushels – the highest level since 2007. Finally, cotton stocks are projected at 5.7 million bales, 50 percent higher than in 2012.”

The “increase area under cultivation” ruse is tirelessly played in the controlled press organs of every nation around the globe to rebut this stunning, unprecendented transformation – but it’s record yields that are something such a falsehood cannot explain away:

“Of the 13 insured crops Yield Manitoba tracks for annual comparisons, eight — Argentine canola, red spring wheat, feed wheat, oats, field peas, non-oil and oil sunflowers — set new provincial yield records, and one — barley — tied the previous record.”

Did you see how they cut the sentence up, to minimize its impact? It should read “eight set new provincial yield records.” But they put the list right in the middle, so you couldn’t read it, and so a search engine would have a tougher time finding it. I call that tactic out every time I see it, and, in the future, a magazine-length article will be easily compiled documenting all of the uses of that baldfacedly-obvious propaganda technique.

Now, are you ready for the mil-speak rebuttal from the Illuminist talking-head shill quoted in that article?

“It’s a testimony to our ability to produce more,” Bruce Burnett, Glacier FarmMedia’s director of markets and weather, said in a recent interview.

The words “mystery”, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything. One of those variants is “surprised.

That’s why the article goes on to bravely say that Glacier FarmMedia’s director of markets and weather “knew Manitoba farmers, on average, reaped another bumper crop last fall, but like other observers, he’s surprised there were so many new records.”

Like other observers? Can you name them? Unnamed “other observers” is a standard ruse, played here to imply that it’s a bunch of people, not just one quoted Illuminist shill, who are “surprised.

I don’t know about you, but I don’t think that feigning surprise or lying baldfacedly are mighty tactical strokes.

Another quoted shill says “I was ready to concede maybe USDA’s projected yields were real. Then we got into harvesting the later planted soybeans. If I had gotten around to writing this blog at the front end of the week, it would have been much different. I kept hearing rumors of record yields. I was about to give in and concede…”

Please recall that this is in the context of average soybean yields in the U.S. setting new records in a stair-step fashion each year between 2014 and 2016, and U.S. soybean stocks that have increased 234 percent from 2012 to 2017.

That’s why I’m going to punch the wound and use that as the title for this post.

These guys and their cronies are being steamrolled by the events I’m documenting here, and I’m Laughing Out Loud as I write this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 20, 2017 – Record soybean yields? Not in my back yard | Farm Futures

I was ready to concede maybe USDA’s projected yields were real. Then we got into harvesting the later planted soybeans. If I had gotten around to writing this blog at the front end of the week, it would have been much different. I kept hearing rumors of record yields. I was about to give in and concede

 

January 2, 2018 – Soybeans: What’s Up with Record Yields, Especially in the Southeast …

Soybean yields in the U.S. have been very high the last 4 years. The U.S. average yield set new records in a stair-step fashion each year between 2014 and 2016.

 

January 12, 2018 – USDA report shows record corn yield, soybean production in 2017 …

 

January 17, 2018 – Can Monster Crop Yields Continue?

USDA’s Jan. 12 Crop Production report confirmed what we’ve known all along: The U.S. produced several monster crops in 2017. For the 2017/18 marketing year production of corn is the second highest on record at 14.6 billion bushels, soybean production is record-high at 4.4 billion bushels, and cotton production is the fourth highest on record at 21.3 million bales.

(“confirmed what we knew all along” sets the tone that this is not stunning, and historically-unprecedented – ed)

While the production of these crops was at or near record highs, crop yields were record-high for corn and cotton, and the second highest on record for soybeans. For corn, the U.S. average yield in 2017 was 176.6 bushels per acre, 2 bushels above last year’s record and 9.8 bushels per acre above the linear trend yield. For soybeans, the U.S. average yield was 49.1 bushels per acre, down 2.9 bushels from last year’s record and 3.2 bushels above the linear trend yield. Finally, for cotton, the U.S. average yield was 899 pounds per acre, 32 pounds above prior-year levels and 54 pounds above trend. Figure 1 details U.S. average corn, soybean and cotton yields from 1960 to 2017.

(“2 bushels above” makes the reader do an extra step, math-wise. It’s 1.14% above the previous year, which was also a record. The U.S. average cotton yield, which cannot be explained away via “increased areas under cultivation”, is listed as “32 pounds above”…that’s a yield 3.7% higher than the previous year and 6.4% above average – ed)

For corn and soybeans, 2017 makes the fifth consecutive year of crop yields above a linear trend. For cotton, crop yields have been above trend for two consecutive years. One impact of multiple years of larger than anticipated yields is that carryout stocks for corn, soybeans and cotton continue to expand. Since the drought year of 2012, corn ending stocks have increased more than 200 percent, and are projected at 2.5 billion bushels – the highest level since 1988. Soybean ending stocks have increased 234 percent over this span, and are projected at 470 million bushels – the highest level since 2007. Finally, cotton stocks are projected at 5.7 million bales, 50 percent higher than in 2012.

(As part of the standard practice within the global news blackout surrounding this subject, the phrase “2 bushels above” is used instead of the more-specific percentage between the two records. So I had to do the math. Back-to-back highest-ever U.S. corn yields, with this year X percent higher than the last. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins.

 

January 19, 2018 – Delaware Soybeans: Record Harvest in 2017 – AgFax

Delaware was one of nine states to break record high yields for soybeans with yields of 51 bushels per acre, up 22.9 percent from 2016

February 15, 2018 – Crop yield records broken across the board

The 2018 edition of Yield Manitoba with this week’s Co-operator has all the details

It’s official. Many Manitoba yield records were broken in 2017, despite a drier-than-normal growing season.

That’s what crop insurance data collected by the Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC) show.

The information is in Yield Manitoba 2018, a supplement to this week’s Manitoba Co-operator.

Of the 13 insured crops Yield Manitoba tracks for annual comparisons, eight — Argentine canola, red spring wheat, feed wheat, oats, field peas, non-oil and oil sunflowers — set new provincial yield records, and one — barley — tied the previous record

It’s a testimony to our ability to produce more,” Bruce Burnett, Glacier FarmMedia’s director of markets and weather, said in a recent interview.

Burnett knew Manitoba farmers, on average, reaped another bumper crop last fall, but like other observers, he’s surprised there were so many new records.

Unfortunately, not all farmers enjoyed a bountiful year. Growers around The Pas had a disastrous growing season. Thousands of acres were too wet to seed and the few acres that did get sown and harvested yielded below average.

Still, not only were a number of new provincial yield records broken, some were smashed.

 

February 19, 2018 – Brazil’s soybean crop seen at record 115.6 mln T | Successful Farming

Brazil’s 2017/18 soybean crop is expected to reach 115.6 million tonnes, a record volume, 1.2 percent above the previous record last year of 114.2 million tonnes

 

February 21, 2018 – Kentucky’s Record Yields Leads To Storage Shortage | Agweb.com

Many farmers are still holding on to grain from last year’s record crop because of low prices and large supplies in the global market. Kentucky farmers broke yield records in both corn and soybeans. The statewide average for corn topped 178 bushels per acre, a 20-bushel increase from 2016.

(As part of the standard practice within the global news blackout surrounding this subject, the phrase “a 20-bushel increase” is used instead of the more-specific percentage between the two records. So I had to do the math. Back-to-back highest-ever grain yields in Kentucky, with this year 30 percent higher than the last. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. – ed)

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