Rising Female Death Rate, Continued – February, 2018

“I say to you, Frodo, that even as I speak to you, I perceive the Dark Lord and know his mind, or all his mind that concerns the Elves. And he gropes ever to see me and my thought. But still the door is closed!”

Lady Galadriel, from “The Fellowship of the Ring“, by J.R.R. Tolkien, 1954

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 31, 1990 – Rising Incidence of Brain Tumors Is Drawing Attention and Concern

 

September 22, 2010 – Smartphones Are Turning Us Into Idiots

Are smartphones going to kill us? Not with brain cancer, but by our own carelessness.

 

May 31, 2011 – The WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer has just issued its decision that non-ionizing radiofrequency radiation is classified as a 2B (Possible) Carcinogen. This is the same category as DDT, lead, and engine exhaust.

 

2014 – On average, adjusted for age, the annual U.S. suicide rate increased 24% over the 15 previous years (1999 – 2014)

 

May 14, 2014 – Cell Phones May Increase Brain Cancer Risk If Use Exceeds 15 Hours A Month

 

February 9, 2015 – Smart phone nation: Americans now spend an average of five hours a day on their smart phones

 

December 17, 2017 – The Risk Of Teen Depression And Suicide Is Linked To Smartphone Use, Study Says.

Overall, suicide risk factors rose significantly after two or more hours a day of time online.

 

 

 

 

 

In 2011, the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer issued its decision that non-ionizing radiofrequency radiation is classified as a 2B (Possible) Carcinogen. And it is known that cell phones may increase brain cancer risk If use exceeds 15 hours a month.

And it is known, further, that 25% of Millennials spend more than 5 hours on their smartphone each day, and more than 50% spend at least 3 hours, compared to just a quarter of Baby Boomers.

That’s why, compared to people born around 1950, those born in 1990 have double the risk of colon cancer and quadruple the risk of rectal cancer compared to those born in 1950.

The words “mystery“, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything. One of those variants is “curious.”

That’s why the article about those quantum increases in cancer says “The study, led by scientists from the American Cancer Society, highlights a “curious” increase colorectal cancer rates in millennials and Generation Xers, including people in their early 50s.”

As an aside, I’d ask that you might consider sending highest Love energy to the people that we’re discussing as you read this.

Women text 35% more and talk on their mobile phones 28% more than men. The article I got that statistic from reads: “Women in the survey, whose findings were released Tuesday, spent about 22 percent more time chatting on mobile phones than men. They spent about 856 minutes per month on the line, on average, compared with 667 minutes for men.”

You’ll notice that they gave you the percentage, right up front…but I checked their math, and they lied by giving you the wrong percentage. My eyes bugged, I smirked, and then I checked the math a second time.

Women spent 28.33% more time chatting, not 22%.

That’s an example of what you call “fact-checking” and also “fake news”.

All of that extra chatting by phone-using women is why brain cancer trends from 1992 to 2006 were downward or flat for all age groups, except among those aged 20–29 years, where there was a statistically significant increasing trend between 1992 and 2006 among females, but not among males. The rising trend in those 20–29-year-old women was driven by a increasing incidence of frontal lobe cancers.

And that’s also why cancer incidence rates for women in Georgia increased from 11% from 1982 to 2011, but dropped 3% for men there during that same time period. A Nielsen survey from 2010 ranked Georgia second-highest of all 50 states in terms of phone use.

The high-phone-use states listed in that survey all have, on average, cancer rates that are above the national average. And close to half of those high-phone-use state have cancer death rates that exceed cancer incidence rates, sometimes by very significant margins.

The top five phone-talk states have brain & ONS cancer rates that are .61% above the national average, and overall cancer rates that are 2.8% above the national average.

While the seven highest-texting states from that same survey have brain & ONS cancer rates that are 4.59% above the national average, and overall cancer rates that are 5.8% above the national average.

Which not only proves phones as cancer-drivers, but also that texting is significantly deadlier than talking on your phone is already.

In the Nielsen survey, Arkansas was listed as one of two states where phone users spent over 800 minutes per month on cell phones. They’re also the highest group in the U.S. when it comes to death from cancer. And they rank 10th in the latest national ranking of suicides per capita, with a suicide rate that is 43% above the national average.

Arkansas’ nation-leading cancer death rate is particularly striking when juxtaposed against a cancer rate there that’s just 1.5% above average. Which is a data point on cancer death rates exceeding cancer incidence rates in a high phone use state.

Texas is also in the 800-minute-per-month club. Suicide rates there have increased 23% since 2000. In 2015, suicide rates for white people in Texas were more than triple those for black and Hispanic people, there. And Texas has the highest maternal mortality rate in the developed world.

Mississippi, ranked first in the nation in texting, and fifth in the nation in terms of phone use, had the highest breast cancer rate in the nation in 2016, and the highest maternal mortality rate in the nation in 2017.

Pennsylvania was the second-highest texting state in the survey, and ranked third in the country in terms of incidence of all cancers in 2013. Pennsylvania’s brain & ONS cancer rate is 10.7% above the national average, while Pennsylvania’s overall cancer rate is 9.2% higher than the national average.

Ohio ranked third out of 50 U.S. states for texting, and ranked as the fourth-worst in the country in terms of breast cancer mortality in 2011. That’s a very-high cancer death rate – fourth in the nation – coming out of an average (nay, improving) overall cancer rate. Which is another data point on cancer death rates exceeding cancer incidence rates in a high phone use state. Did I mention that Ohio’s maternal mortality rate was 22% above the national average?

Tennessee, ranked fourth in the nation in terms of phone use, had the 6th highest cancer death rate out of all 50 states in 2013, and had a suicide rate in 2015 that was 21% above the national average. Lung cancer incidence rates for White and Black men in Tennessee are between 50-100% higher than the national rate.

In fourth place for texting overall, Oklahoma ranked only 31st in terms of new cancer cases, but ranked as fifth-worst in terms of cancer-related deaths. Which is another data point on cancer death rates exceeding cancer incidence rates in a high phone use state.

In 2016, the suicide rate in Oklahoma was 13th highest in the nation, and 37 percent higher than the national average. Oklahoma had the fifth-worst infant mortality rates in the country in 2015.

Kansas came in fifth-highest out of 50 states in terms of texting. Their overall cancer rate is 9.2% above the national average.

Sixth-highest of 50 U.S. States in terms of texting, Wyoming’s brain & ONS cancer rate is 7.6% higher than the national average, and their overall cancer rate is 9.5% higher than the national average. Wyoming’s suicide rate ranked fourth in the nation in 2017.

Utah was the seventh-highest state in terms of texting. Utah’s Brain & ONS cancer rate is 7.7% above the national average, while the overall cancer rate is 3.4% above the national average.

Florida, the U.S. State where people talk on their phones the most (versus text), also had the highest lung cancer rate in the nation in 2014. The suicide rate in Florida is 8% higher than the U.S. average.

I put this together in one evening, and am neither a statistician nor a scientist by training. I majored in English in College. The only two courses I ever failed in my life were Trigonometry in High School, and Probability in Statistics my freshman year of College, and I tried in both cases. Which is a bizarre but ultimately cheering footnote to this whole affair, don’t you think?

If more than one person worked on this for more than three hours, the picture here would come into crystal clarity. And I would suggest that the picture is pretty clear, already.

My wife called me from the Apple store yesterday and excitedly told me how she was going to hook up her mom, who has a flip phone, with my wife’s old iPhone. Her mom is in the midst of breast cancer treatment, at the age of 70.

I couldn’t say anything, about anything. It wouldn’t be socially-correct. it would make me “Debbie Downer”, from the old Saturday Night Live sketch. I’ve said my piece about the subject before, and won’t browbeat them, or anyone else about it. That’s why I’ve posted this on an Obscure Internet Blog. You have to find your way all the way here to it, because you wanted to read something like it.

So why go through this exercise, at all? Because I felt I had to, and feel I have to. If you knew there was a pipe leaking in the basement, and you didn’t say anything, that would be really bad, right? You would speak up, and then you would fix the pipe.

And it’s not water in the basement, it’s Life and Death we’re talking about, here.

Thanks for taking the time to read this, and for taking action to improve the situation in whatever way makes best sense to you at this time.

Jeff Miller, February 23, 2018

 

 

 

 

July 31, 1990 – Rising Incidence of Brain Tumors Is Drawing Attention and Concern

 

July 16, 2010 – If cellular phone use causes brain cancer, one might expect the effects of such a prevalent exposure to be reflected in general population incidence rates, unless the induction period is very long or confined to very long-term users.

Log-linear models were used to estimate the annual percent change in rates among whites. With the exception of the 20–29-year age group, the trends for 1992–2006 were downward or flat. Among those aged 20–29 years, there was a statistically significant increasing trend between 1992 and 2006 among females but not among males. The recent trend in 20–29-year-old women was driven by a rising incidence of frontal lobe cancers.

 

March 20, 2010 – Louisiana ranks 46th on maternal mortality, records 15.9 deaths per

(That’s “fourth-highest” – ed)

 

August 25, 2010 – Women text and talk on their mobile phones more than men.

Women in the survey, whose findings were released Tuesday, spent about 22 percent more time chatting on mobile phones than men. They spent about 856 minutes per month on the line, on average, compared with 667 minutes for men.

(They gave you the percentage, but I checked their math, and they lied by giving you the wrong percentage. It’s 28% more. That’s an example of what you call “fake news”.

Women also texted more, sending or receiving an average of 601 texts per month, compared with 447 for men.

(That’s 35% more. They gave you the numbers, but carefully hedged by omitting the percentage, as including it would have been much more impactful. So I had to do the math. – ed)

In the South, folks spent significantly longer chatting on their mobile devices.

In eight Southern states — Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana,

Arkansas and Texas — users spent more than 800 minutes per month talking.

Florida, with one of the highest median ages in the country, ranked high on the list of active talkers but among the lowest in text messaging.

Meanwhile, the most text-happy states were Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Oklahoma, Kansas, Wyoming and Utah. Texters in each state averaged more than 600 messages per month.

In news that will come as no surprise to parents everywhere, teenagers were far and away the busiest texters. They averaged a thumb-numbing 2,779 texts per month, according to Nielsen.

That’s more than double the 1,299 sent by the 18- to 24-year-old age group, and nearly three times the 952 sent and received by 25- to 34-year-olds.

Not surprisingly, mobile phone users older than 65 were the least active, barely registering with an average of 32 texts per month.

 

September 22, 2010 – Smartphones Are Turning Us Into Idiots

Are smartphones going to kill us? Not with brain cancer, but by our own carelessness.

 

2011 – Alabama has one of the highest cancer mortality rates in the nation

 

May 31, 2011 – The WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer has just issued it’s decision that non-ionizing radiofrequency radiation is classified as a 2B (Possible) Carcinogen. This is the same category as DDT, lead, and engine exhaust.

 

December 14, 2012 – I Refuse To Get A Smartphone And It Seems To Really Upset People

 

2013 – In 2013, the Kansas suicide rate (14.7 suicides per 100,000 population) was 16.7 percent higher than the national rate (12.6 suicides per 100,000 population). White non-Hispanics accounted for 88.8 percent (3,491 deaths) of Kansas resident suicides during the 2004-2013 period.

 

Ocrtober 29, 2013 – In incidence of all cancers, Pennsylvania ranked third in the country with 489.1 cases per 100,000 population, trailing Delaware with 491.2 and Kentucky at 510.7 cases per 100,000.

 

2014 – On average, adjusted for age, the annual U.S. suicide rate increased 24% over the 15 previous years (1999 – 2014)

 

2014 – Kansas – New Cancer Case (Incidence) Rates – 449.1, US average, 436.6

Cancer Death rates in Kansas, 166.6, U.S. average, 161.3

(Cancer incidence, 2.8% above the national average, and cancer death rates 3.3% above the national average.

 

May 14, 2014 – Cell Phones May Increase Brain Cancer Risk If Use Exceeds 15 Hours A Month

(That’s two hours per day – ed)

 

2015 – Ohio maternal mortality rate, 5.9, US average, 7.2, 22% above the national average.

 

February 9, 2015 – Smart phone nation: Americans now spend an average of five hours a day on their smart phones

 

 

April 17, 2015 – I purchased my first smartphone today and I already hate it.

I said goodbye to my old Nokia cellphone today and bought my very first smartphone. Ugh. I already hate the thing.

 

March 25, 2015 – The Status of Suicide in Tennessee 2015 reports 1,017 suicide deaths at a rate of 15.7 per 100,000. The nationwide rate is 13 per 100,000.

(21% – ed)

 

August 31, 2015 – In Georgia, cancer incidence rates for women increased from 365.1 per 100,000 in 1982 to 404.2 per 100,000 in 2011, but, for men, cancer incidence rates showed a slight decline from 528.0 per 100,000 in 1982 to 513.7 per 100,000 in 2011

(11% increase for women. 3% drop for men. – ed)

 

August 17, 2015 – Oklahoma Watch: State suicide rate ranks among highest – Tulsa World

One of the paradoxes of Oklahoma is that as friendly as people are, many Oklahomans sink into despair and take their own lives. The state has one of the highest suicide rates in the nation, ranking 13th among states and the District of Columbia in 2013, according to the latest state-level figures from the

 

September 28, 2015 – After years of increase, Alabama’s suicide rate well above national average.

Alabama in 2013 had a per capita suicide rate of 14.9 per 100000 people, while the national rate was 13.

(15%  –  ed)

 

September 2, 2015 – Ohio now ranks 34th in the nation for incidences of breast cancer — an improvement from 32nd in the 2011 report. But the state’s breast cancer death rate of 24.8 per 100,000 women ranks as the fourth worst in the country.

 

October 15, 2015 – 8 Reasons Why People Who Hate Smartphones Are The Worst

 

2016 – Suicide Death Rate in Louisiana is Greater than National Average

As is the case in the United States as a whole, suicide rates are on the rise in Louisiana. According to the American Society for Suicide Prevention, suicide is the eleventh leading cause of death in Louisiana, and was responsible for 679 deaths in 2016. This figure puts the suicide rate in Louisiana at 14.29% which is slightly above the national average of 12.93%.

(11%, described as “greater” and  “slightly” above

 

April 29, 2016 – We may have reached a tipping point in global smartphone sales.

Worldwide smartphone shipments stayed flat in the first quarter of 2016 for the smallest year-over-year increase in history.

 

May 17, 2016 – States with the highest cancer rates | WTOP

For example, Connecticut has one of the highest cancer incidence rates in the nation (7th most in the nation), but one of the lowest cancer-related mortality rates (42nd). Meanwhile, Oklahoma is just the opposite: fewer new cancer cases (31st) , but many more cancer-related deaths per 100K people

 

August 21, 2016 – Suicide rates in Oklahoma, Tulsa among highest in the US

Oklahoma’s suicide rate is 37 percent higher than the national rate,

 

December 15, 2016 – Oklahoma ranks among worst in U.S. for health | News OK

Oklahoma had one of the worst infant mortality rates, the number of babies that die before they reach their first birthday per 1,000 live births. The state saw eight infant deaths per 1,000 live births, the fifth-worst rate in the country.

 

January 24, 2017 – Cancer down nationwide, but ‘hot spots’ persist – CNN – CNN.com

Breast cancer, on the other hand, lit up the map along the Mississippi River and Southern belt. It was highest in Madison County, Mississippi, with 52 deaths per 100,000 people.

 

February 28, 2017 – Colorectal cancer rates rising in Gen X and millennials, study finds

Colorectal cancer rates have been declining overall in the United States since the mid-1980s, but certain age groups are seeing a concerning rise in cases, according to new research.

The study, led by scientists from the American Cancer Society, highlights a “curious” increase colorectal cancer rates in millennials and Generation Xers, including people in their early 50s.

Compared to people born around 1950, those born in 1990 have double the risk of colon cancer and quadruple the risk of rectal cancer, according to findings published in Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

 

 

My 8, 2017 – In all Tennessee health regions, lung cancer incidence rates for White and Black men are between 50-100% higher than the national rate.

 

Tennessee has the 6th highest cancer death rate out of all 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2013

 

May 8, 2017 – Smartphone Obsession Grows with 25% of Millennials Spending More Than 5 Hours Per Day on the Phone

 

25% of Millennials spend more than 5 hours on their smartphone each day and more than 50% spend at least 3 hours compared to a quarter of Baby Boomers. Baby boomers in the US who spend at least 3 hours on their phone are close to the global average, while Baby Boomers in India (42%) and Brazil (49%) are much heavier users.

 

 

 

June 20, 2017 – AUSTIN – An analysis from the University of Texas System and UT Health Northeast shows that suicide rates among white Texas residents has been trending up since 2000. UT reports suicide rates for white people were more than triple the rates for white people than black black and Hispanic people in 2015.

 

 

July 19, 2017 – Suicide Death Rates in Wyoming – KCWY

 

Suicide remains a leading cause of death in Wyoming. The state ranks fourth in the nation for suicide rates.

 

 

August 12, 2017 – Texas Has the Highest Maternal Mortality Rate in the Developed World

 

November 16, 2017 – Rate of infant death in Alabama increased in 2016

 

 

The infant mortality rate in Alabama increased sharply last year – jumping to more than 9 deaths per 1,000 births for the first time since 2008. Alabama’s infant mortality rate is among the worst in the nation, and much higher than the national average of 5.8 in 2014.

 

The overall infant mortality rate for the United States fell by 15 percent from 2005 to 2014

 

(55% higher than the national average.

December 17, 2017 – The Risk Of Teen Depression And Suicide Is Linked To Smartphone Use, Study Says.

time spent online also was linked to mental-health issues across two different data sets. We found that teens who spent five or more hours a day online were 71 percent more likely than those who spent only one hour a day to have at least one suicide risk factor (depression, thinking about suicide, making a suicide plan or attempting suicide). Overall, suicide risk factors rose significantly after two or more hours a day of time online.

January 4, 2018 – From 2013 to 2015, Alabama had the second-highest infant mortality rate at 8.52 deaths per thousand live births.

 

Mississippi had the highest mortality rate in the nation, with 9.08 deaths per thousand live births.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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