Did you know that the total catch of Walleye on Lake Erie doubled in 2017, to the highest level in history?

It’s February, 2018, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime.

Since that statement directly refutes our State Religion, which holds that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind“, I’ve appended two recent news stories below to support it.

In the first, from Russia, we learn that Kamchatka crab “hit record in 2017.” That’s about as close as you’ll get to knowing how many crabs they caught, because the news blackout that’s underway worldwide in regard to this subject matter is also in effect here.

The article tells us that “the population of the Kamchatka crab previously peaked in 2004“, which is a witch-crafty way of saying “the old record was set in 2014.”  They don’t give us that number, either.

The article goes on to say that “In addition to Kamchatka crab, the population of opilio crab, according to the agency’s scientists, has also grown. Due to this, total catch of both species in the Barents Sea may reach 18,000 metric tons this year.”

So we learn that crabs of all sorts are doing great, but they’ve mixed them all together, to muddy the numbers.

In the second article, headlined “Walleye catch rate sets record – and 2018 could be better“, the stunning transformation of the larger environment is again on display.

We learn that, “In 2017, the catch rate was .52 fish per hour“…”nearly three times the 30-year average“. They always go to the averages, to muddy the numbers, to blunt, to defray.

“We learn that “Our previous best-ever catch rate for walleye on Lake Erie was .32 fish per hour,”

If you read the article you’ll notice that they gave you the numbers, but carefully cut them up into different paragraphs, and pointedly avoided providing the percentage increase between them, as including it would be much more impactful, and go badly off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. That’s a 63% increase in catch rate.

The article lets us know that “Over 70,000 walleye were harvested last year.” That number is purposefully general, and, as you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.

in 2016 the catch was just over 60,000 walleye (almost half) and the harvest was nearly 51,000 fish.”

“the total catch…was nearly 120,000 walleye last year.”

Total catch increased 100%. Using 71,000 as “over 70,000“, harvest increased 39%.

How long do you think formulaic, repetitive propaganda tactics are going to hold back wider awareness of the subject we’re discussing here? Not forever, I can assure you.

As impressive as a globally-controlled Media establishment may be on some levels, at the end of the day it’s yacking, blathering – it’s not a player, tactically, logistically.

Put a fork in them, these guys are done.

Please consider sending them highest love energy as you read this.

 

 

 

 

January 31, 2018 – Russians say Barents Sea king crab population hit record in 2017

The population of Kamchatka crab in the Barents Sea reached a historical record in 2017 said Russia’s fishing agency, Rybolovstvo.

This may result in an increase of the total allowable catch by the Russian government in 2018 and the abolishment of the existing ban on coastal crab production in Russia, which has long been lobbied for by some leading local crab producers.

In addition to Kamchatka crab, the population of opilio crab, according to the agency’s scientists, has also grown. Due to this, total catch of both species in the Barents Sea may reach 18,000 metric tons this year.

The population of the Kamchatka crab previously peaked in 2004, according Konstantin Sokolov, head of the Coastal Research Laboratory of the Polar Scientific Research Institute of Marine Fisheries and Oceanography (PINRO).

He also added that since 2004 the population has started to decline. However, it has grown in the last two years.

(where “has grown” is general – general is a hallmark of propaganda – ed)

In the meantime, the rising Russian crab biomass has already led producers there to start a new wave of pressure on the country’s government to lift the existing ban on crab catch in the 12-mile coastal zone.

Producers have already said they will provide additional guarantees on the release of all the juvenile and females during their fishing, as required by Russian legislation. They also pointed to the need to use the experience of neighboring Norway, which does not have any bans on the crab catch within its nearshore coastal area.

In the meantime, the attempts of producers to lift the ban have generally been rejected by the Russian government on the basis of recommendations of PINRO scientists and other research institutions, who disagree with producers on crab mortality.

They claim that more than 90% of the nearshore traps have excessive bycatch of small and female crabs. They believe lifting the ban will result in a significant decline of Russia’s crab biomass.

Russia’s Rosrybolovstvo also believes in order to abolish the moratorium on the coastal fishing of the Kamchatka crab, additional results of juveniles and female bycatch observations in territorial waters are needed.

A spokesman of Rosrybolovstvo said it is necessary to determine those fishing areas and zones, where the total bycatch will be less than 25%, and confirm this by regular observations.

Panelists at the recent Global Seafood Market Conference predicted that more Russian supply will hit the market in 2018 — the country’s red king crab quota, split between the Barents Sea and Far East fisheries, is expected to reach around 26,000t in 2018, compared to over 21,000t in 2017.

 

January 31, 2018 – Buffalo, NY – Walleye catch rate sets record – and 2018 could be better

Records were made to be broken. At least, that’s how the saying goes. However, walleye fishing in Lake Erie was literally at the top of its game again in 2017 after setting a new all-time mark in 2014. And with the way things are going in this Great Lake, don’t be surprised if it happens again this year. It’s scaryscary good.

(The two biggest numbers in history in the time period covered by this thread  – ed)

Based on the Lake Erie creel census where thousands of anglers were surveyed between May 1 and Oct. 31, walleye fishermen experienced the highest catch per unit effort that the lake has ever seen in the 30 years of the census. In 2017, the catch rate was .52 fish per hour, nearly three times the 30-year average. While that might not seem like anything special, let’s put it into a better perspective.

“Our previous best-ever catch rate for walleye on Lake Erie was .32 fish per hour,” says Jason Robinson, fisheries biologist for the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation’s Lake Erie Unit. “That came in 2014 and that was a great fishing year. In fact it was our last record year. It was that much better last year.”

So let’s talk actual numbers. Over 70,000 walleye were harvested last year – caught and kept for the frying pan. It doesn’t get much better than fresh walleye in the hot oil (or no matter how it’s cooked). However, the Catch Per Effort (CPE) is based on the total catch and that was nearly 120,000 walleye last year.

“The massive increase in catch in 2017 was largely due to the number of sub-legal walleye caught early in the season,” said Robinson. To compare, in 2016 the catch was just over 60,000 walleye (almost half) and the harvest was nearly 51,000 fish – quite a difference.

(While some were assuredly undersized, the majority of the truth is that that limit of how many fish people wanted to eat was reached, and they released the rest- ed)

The reason for the increase in natural reproduction is a perfect storm of conditions. “It’s a complicated interplay of spawning stock biomass, temperature and food availability,” says Robinson. “The conventional wisdom is that extremely cold winters produce good year classes of walleyes, but that is not a perfect indicator. We cannot always predict and we certainly can’t control when walleye will produce good year classes. And walleye year classes do not always produce uniformly around the lake.”

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2 thoughts on “Did you know that the total catch of Walleye on Lake Erie doubled in 2017, to the highest level in history?

  1. TeresaE

    Erie was a dead lake in the 70s. It stank to high heaven, and if you ventured in you came out covered in an oily, itchy, stinky substance that was never admitted to be the powers that were.
    Enter the zebra mussel and boosting/intentions/orgonite.
    Love it, love it, love it.
    Thank you for this Jeff, for even though we live 30 miles from Erie, this made no local news and the fishermen I know haven’t mentioned it either.
    Love that I have local, understandable proof. Fabulous

    Reply
  2. Jeff Miller

    Teresa, good morning – thanks for this positive feedback.

    The zebra mussel is often held up in the controlled press as a local, micro-level plausible-deniability excuse. This thread being filled to the brim, of course, with documentation of booming, burgeoning fish populations and clarifying waters where there are zip, zero zebra mussels.

    I would list them as “orgonite/boosting/intentions”, in order of influence, versus the opposite, as you have them.

    Thanks again for reading and for the uplifting comment.

    Reply

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