2017 – “Scallop prices have dived due to large catches”

“The Ministry of Truth, which concerned itself with news, entertainment, education, and the fine arts. The Ministry of Peace, which concerned itself with war. The Ministry of Love, which maintained law and order. And the Ministry of Plenty, which was responsible for economic affairs. Their names, in Newspeak: Minitrue, Minipax, Miniluv, and Miniplenty.”

George Orwell, from “1984

 

 

February 8, 2017 – Florida – WC approves shortened 2017 scallop season for St. Joe Bay

June 9, 2017 – Scallop Prices Have Dived due to Large Catches – total scallop catches within this season are forecast to rise 15% year-over-year, to around 48 million pounds.

 

 

March 22, 2017 – Regulators close federal scallop fishing grounds in Gulf of Maine

December 5, 2017 – Maine – Prices look low as scallop season opens
 

 

Given that prices drop either when supply increases, or demand decreases, or both, you can see from the two sets of quotes immediately above that the folks in charge are not your friends, and are lying to you about basically everything, including the scallops.

It’s January, 2018, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime. Since that statement directly refutes our State Religion, which holds that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind”, I’ve appended numerous recent scallop-related news accounts below to support it.

One of them is from just a few months ago, from Martha’s Vineyard. It says “The first scallop spawn of the season was another spectacular success. Something is happening this season. Is it the rainy spring and cool temperatures?

Now, a cool spring in the midst of the hottest year in the history of planet Earth is remarkable enough in its own right. (To preserve current programming levels, narrow eyes and bitterly affirm “yeah, but that’s THERE.”)

But the author knows that “something is happening this season”. They’re trying to say “great, epochal positive changes are underway at every level of our reality, and those changes are increasing in speed and magnitude”, but haven’t quite gotten there in the process, yet. But soon they will!

Prices drop when either supply increases, or demand decreases, or both. That’s why a story from Maine from about a month ago is headlined “Prices look low as scallop season opens.”

They’ve done what they can to hedge, there, by saying that prices only look low.

The great news is that the lies and hedging of a wholly-controlled press is about all these people have got left at this point, which is why another article below, from 2015, says “Pine Island Scallop Count Gives Mixed Results”.

It goes on to say that “The volunteers only found 32 scallops, compared with 44 last year. But Hazell said snorkelers found scallops in more areas this year than ever before.”

So there you can see the hand-picked Illuminist-bloodline family members featured in the article worked extra hard to create a picture of scallop scarcity in the face of a booming scallop population, e.g. “in more areas this year than ever before.” You can read the rest of their misleading “dead scallop” reportage below.

You can see precisely the same pattern of obfuscation in the story from Florida from 2017 headlined “2017 – Florida – Scallop abundance declined in three of the four open-harvest areas.

Pretty depressing headline, right? But we go on to read that “In St. Joseph Bay scallop density Increased (2 scallops per survey station in 2016 to 7 in 2017). The percentage of stations with scallops present increased. This area will be open for a limited season.”

We go on to read “In Franklin/Wakulla area, density decreased (28 in 2016 to 20 in 2017) but the percentage of stations with scallops present increased.”

I’m suggesting that the decreasing density numbers here are, again, fabricated – in that they don’t make logical sense in a biosphere that is generally increasing in health, e.g. “the percentage of stations with scallops present increased.” I’m guessing they can’t get enough Illuminist-bloodline family members engaged to control and coopt all the surveys, but rather only some of them, which get featured most prominently in the lurid news stories.

In the first example, the folks in charge curtailed the season in the face of an admitted 250% increase in scallop density, under the false guise of caring about the scallops, and you. Which really tells you all you need to know about them.

I’m talking about the people who wouldn’t tell you what the percentage increase of stations with scallops present actually was.

An article from Massachusetts from just last month reads “Asked if a good opening day means a good season, one fisherman shrugged and said, ‘You won’t see any plumbers giving up their day job’.”

Did you notice that the fisherman is unnamed? That’s because the quote is made-up, it’s “fake news”.

Which continues with “Sarcasm aside, fishermen also said the harbor seems healthier than it did last year.”

Please notice the “fishermen”, plural, also unnamed, who are, in fact, also made up, like the first one I mentioned. For those new to the game, anytime no one specific is quoted it’s made up. P.s., “seems” is hypothetical, general, a hallmark of propaganda.

When, at last, we get to the actual, real quote, it is “buried”, in journalistic parlance, down below those two previous fake-news nuggets. In it, we read:

“It’s nice to see lots of scallops,” said Rick Kotalac, who scallops in the town harbor. “It’s good to see some green eel grass and some healthier looking scallops.”

Oh, my, “lots of scallops.

Lot’s of big scallops. “Since the new season started in March of last year, U.S. catches have been made up mainly of U10s, U20s and U30s.” (U10’s are the largest – ed)

By the way, the article I got that from is headlined “Scallop Prices Have Dived due to Large Catches”. That’s because prices drop when either supply increases, or demand decreases, or both.

If Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, and the scallops are doing so poorly, how can total scallop catches for the 2017 season be forecast to rise 15% year-over-year?

The positive changes that we’re witnessing as the energy balance on Earth returns to the positive are increasing in both speed and magnitude. How long do you think the folks who worked so hard on the down-low to ruin the energy balance on the planet are going to remain in charge of things, as the general populace awakens to the magnitude of the depravity, and of the charade perpetrated upon them?

Not very long, I don’t think. Please consider sending them highest Love energy as you read this.

 

 

 

 

August 23, 2012 – New survey of ocean floor finds juvenile scallops are abundant in Mid-Atlantic

Researchers are getting a comprehensive view of the ocean floor using a new instrument, and have confirmed that there are high numbers of young sea scallops off of Delaware Bay.

 

July 5, 2015 – HabCamV4 sees large numbers of young scallops off Delaware Bay

 

July 28, 2015 – Pine Island Scallop Count Gives Mixed Results

After about 20 minutes, the group swam back empty-handed.

“No scallops?” Kilmartin asked the group.

One dead– dead scallop half-shell,” said Nikhil Mehta, a local biologist.

He and the others only found one white scallop half-shell. Mehta said it was bleached, indicating it had been dead for a while.

The volunteers only found 32 scallops, compared with 44 last year. But Hazell said snorkelers found scallops in more areas this year than ever before.
2017 – Florida – Scallop abundance declined in three of the four open-harvest areas:

In St. Joseph Bay scallop density Increased (2 scallops per survey station in 2016 to 7 in 2017). The percentage of stations with scallops present increased. This area will be open for a limited season.

(Where the emotionally-flat term “increased” is used to describe a 250% increase. – ed)

In Franklin/Wakulla area, density decreased (28 in 2016 to 20 in 2017) but the percentage of stations with scallops present increased.

In Taylor/Dixie scallop density decreased (189 in 2016 to 62 in 2017) but all survey stations had scallops present. This area opened to harvest early and will also close early in 2017.

(How many stations had scallops last season, compared to this one? That’s carefully obfuscated. – ed)

In Citrus/Hernando County (open to harvest) density decreased (55 in 2016 to 34 in 2017) but the percentage of stations with scallops present increased.

 

February 8, 2017 – Florida – WC approves shortened 2017 scallop season for St. Joe Bay

 

March 22, 2017 – Regulators close federal scallop fishing grounds in Gulf of Maine

 

June 9, 2017 – Scallop Prices Have Dived due to Large Catches

Prices peak seasonally at the start of the year due to declining stocks in line with the end of the fishing season, with prices rising 13% from December to January. U.S. sea scallop prices have, however, fallen 34% since March, due to not only the number of scallops caught by fishing vessels but also the size of the individual scallops.

The larger scallops are mainly caught along the Eastern seaboard in New Jersey, Virginia and Massachusetts, and the price fall has been led by catches of these large scallops. Scallops are sold by their count per pound, with U10 being the largest, and within the U.S., the larger sizes are by far the most popular with consumers.

Since the new season started in March, U.S. catches have been made up mainly of U10s, U20s and U30s, an exciting prospect for fishermen and seafood lovers alike. Scallop prices for U10s dropped 19% to $13.70 per pound, while 20s and 30s dropped 20% to $7.47 per pound during April. Total scallop catches within this season are forecast to rise 15% year-over-year, to around 48 million pounds.

 

August 8, 2017 – First scallop spawn of the season!

Martha’s Vineyard – The first scallop spawn of the season was another spectacular success. Something is happening this season. Is it the rainy spring and cool temperatures? We couldnt say but the the egg numbers during spawns have been through the roof! Once again a record spawn with 99 million eggs collected.

 

November 2, 2017 – Massachusetts – Scallop season opens on a high note

By the afternoon of opening day of commercial scalloping season yesterday, a few things were certain. The fleet was small, with 25 boats in town and between 12 and 15 in Madaket. Most fishermen were back at the dock by 10 a.m. The scallops were decent-sized. And the opening price to fishermen was $13 a pound.

Asked if a good opening day means a good season, one fisherman shrugged and said, “You won’t see any plumbers giving up their day job.”

Sarcasm aside, fishermen also said the harbor seems healthier than it did last year.

“It’s nice to see lots of scallops,” said Rick Kotalac, who scallops in the town harbor. “It’s good to see some green eel grass and some healthier looking scallops.”

 

December 5, 2017 – Maine – Prices look low as scallop season opens

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