Did you know that American soda consumption has dropped almost 40 percent over the last twenty years?

     

“The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa.

As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother’s speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened.

Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan.

Today’s issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston’s job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones.

As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a “categorical pledge” were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984.

Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grams to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April.”

George Orwell, from “1984

 

 

 

 

 

Mar 11, 2013 – Recommended: Who owns Gatorade: Coke or Pepsi? Take our ‘parent company’ quiz! For more than two decades, soda was the No. 1 drink in the U.S. with per capita consumption peaking in 1998 at 54 gallons a year.

 

March 1, 2017 – Americans drink less soda. In fact, per-capita consumption for carbonated soft drinks peaked in the United States in 1998 at nearly 53 gallons, dropping to 41 gallons in 2015

 

June 27, 2017 – In 2016, each person in the United States drank 39.3 gallons of bottled water, compared with 38.5 gallons of carbonated soft drinks, according to data from Beverage Marketing Corp., Reuters reported. That’s a dramatic drop for soda consumption from its heights in the late 1990s and early 2000s of over 50 gallons per person.

 

 

 

In that set of quotes immediately above you can see how, in 2013, the Ministry of Truth documented the peak 1998 soda consumption number as “54 gallons a year”. Then in March of 2017, they revised it downward and generalized it to “nearly 53 gallons”. And then, in June of 2017, they revised it downward yet again and made it even more general, to “over 50.”

You can see them “walk” it carefully, over time from the earliest, specific example (“54 gallons”) through “nearly 53 gallons”, to “Over 50 gallons”, which are both general, a hallmark of propaganda. They’ve made the number smaller and less-impactful each time, to try via subterfuge to downplay the magnitude of the horrible problem that consumers have realized the manufacturers deliberately created.

“Walk” is, by the way, an actual journalism and public relations term. You “walk it back” – move in devious little steps – vs. in one big conceptual leap.

And while they all gave you the numbers – sort of – they also deliberately hedged by omitting the percentage of the decrease, as providing it would be specific, and much more impactful.

Going from 54 gallons in 1998 to 39.3 in 2016, is a 37 percent decrease in per capita soda consumption in just under two decades (and that’s 18 years, to be exact).

The “nearly 53 gallons” article is headlined “Americans drink less soda.”

Where “less” is general, a hallmark of propaganda; it’s used here to avoid writing the more impactful, specific headline: “American soda consumption dropped almost 40 percent over the last twenty years.” Now read theirs again: “Americans drink less soda“.

The words “mystery”, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything. One of those variants is “unknown”.

That’s why an article I’ve appended below says “people who drank one to six artificially sweetened drinks a week had twice the risk of stroke. There were similar, although weaker, associations for dementia risk. The reasons for the link remain unknown.”

Another article says “Sugar-sweetened beverages were not associated with stroke or dementia”, which squarely proves that it’s the Aspartame, stupid.

But I shouldn’t be so coarse, as most of the rubes have already gotten wise to the con, vis a vis this from just two months ago: “Diet soda sales fizzle as health-conscious consumers turn to other drinks.”

41 gallons in 2015 to 38.5 gallons in 2016 is a 6% drop, in one year. The 37% drop over eighteen years mentioned previously average to a roughly 2% drop per year. Which proves that the positive change – people drinking less soda – is increasing in speed and magnitude.

 

 

 

 

March 11, 2013 – Recommended: Who owns Gatorade: Coke or Pepsi? Take our ‘parent company’ quiz! For more than two decades, soda was the No. 1 drink in the U.S. with per capita consumption peaking in 1998 at 54 gallons a year.

 

February 16, 2017 – Coca-Cola preps Diet Coke push with advertising shift – Marketing Week

 

March 1, 2017 – Americans drink less soda. In fact, per-capita consumption for carbonated soft drinks peaked in the United States in 1998 at nearly 53 gallons, dropping to 41 gallons in 2015.

 

April 20, 2017 – Do Diet Sodas Pose Health Risks? – WebMD

 

April 20, 2017 – Sugar- and Artificially Sweetened Beverages and the Risks of Incident Stroke and Dementia

Background and Purpose—Sugar- and artificially-sweetened beverage intake have been linked to cardiometabolic risk factors, which increase the risk of cerebrovascular disease and dementia

Results—After adjustments for age, sex, education (for analysis of dementia), caloric intake, diet quality, physical activity, and smoking, higher recent and higher cumulative intake of artificially sweetened soft drinks were associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, all-cause dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease dementia. When comparing daily cumulative intake to 0 per week (reference), the hazard ratios were 2.96 (95% confidence interval, 1.26–6.97) for ischemic stroke and 2.89 (95% confidence interval, 1.18–7.07) for Alzheimer’s disease. Sugar-sweetened beverages were not associated with stroke or dementia.

(Notice how the Aspartame’s the key? Not even the high-fructose corn syrup can mess you up like Aspartame does. – ed)

 

April 21, 2017 – Here’s a scary new reason to stop drinking diet soda – Moneyish

New health studies link sugary drinks to brain damage – and diet sodas in particular to almost tripling stroke and dementia risk.

 

April 26, 2017 – The study, in the journal Stroke, found that compared with those who did not drink diet soda, people who drank one to six artificially sweetened drinks a week had twice the risk of stroke. There were similar, although weaker, associations for dementia risk. The reasons for the link remain unknown.

 

June 6, 2017 – Mounting Evidence Grows Against Diet Soda

 

June 27, 2017 – The biggest losers, Diet Coke and Diet Pepsi, may seem like healthy alternatives to their full-sugar sister brands, but changing attitudes has led them to being America’s fastest-declining soda brands at a time when the overall market for sodas in general has declined steeply.

What’s happening in the beverage market?

Americans have finally accepted the idea that soda can harm their heath. That has led to an increase in bottled-water consumption.

In 2016, each person in the United States drank 39.3 gallons of bottled water, compared with 38.5 gallons of carbonated soft drinks, according to data from Beverage Marketing Corp., Reuters reported. That’s a dramatic drop for soda consumption from its heights in the late 1990s and early 2000s of over 50 gallons per person.

 

July 18, 2017 – Diet drinks may cause weight gain, new research suggests

 

August 14, 2017 – Does Soda Increase the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer? – Livestrong.com

 

October 5, 2017 – Diet soda sales fizzle as health-conscious consumers turn to other drinks

 

October 19, 2017 – Coca-Cola blasts ‘meritless’ diet soda lawsuit – FoodNavigator-USA

As described in the US Right to Know citizen’s petition, these studies suggest linkage or association between use of ‘diet’ sodas and weight gain

 

December 11, 2017 – President Trump Reportedly Drinks 12 Diet Cokes Per Day – Grub Street

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