“My business is that of every other good citizen – to uphold the law.”

     

“My name is Sherlock Holmes,” said my companion. “Possibly it is familiar to you. In any case, my business is that of every other good citizen – to uphold the law. It seems to me that you have much to answer for.”

From “The Adventure of Soscombe Old Place”, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1927

 

 

 

 

 

It’s December, 2017, and the Great Artificial Drought has been broken by the slow, steady, widespread and ever-increasing distribution of simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices in the vicinity of the weather warfare intrastructure that many still mistakenly presume only carries cell phone traffic and weather radar data.

I’ve appended numerous news stories from the past year below to support that assertion.

The words “mystery”, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything. One of those variants is “mind-boggling”.

That’s why a story below from April of this year says “After 63 feet of snow, Northern California mountains break record for wettest water year – a mind-boggling 751 inches of snow have pummeled the Sugar Bowl ski area near Lake Tahoe this winter.”

The term “mind-boggling” is general, and emotional – hallmarks of Propaganda. But read on and you’ll see that there is no specific mention of what the previous Sugar Bowl snow record was, at all – and certainly not of the percentage increase between the two.

The story goes on to provide the old and new (average) records, but carefully hedges by omitting the percentage increase between them, as printing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. It’s 1.3% percent above the previous record. You’ll notice that they picked eight “representative” stations, but I’ll bet you a dollar they picked the eight with the smallest increases in the entire Sierra. But you’ll see a followup post on that, later.

The same formulaic patterns of obfuscation are repeated in the other articles, and that obfuscation is carefully broken down and analyzed below each article.

I mentioned to my wife that it snowed in my hometown throughout my childhood, but that snowfall levels started dropping off and it got droughty around the late 1970’s, but that now it was snowing again at or past levels I’d seen as a kid.

She said, basically “are you sure you aren’t just remembering it that way?”

I hopped online and tried to find a record of annual snowfall totals for Allentown, PA, where I grew up. They have the functions set so it’s very difficult to get that data.

I’m going to keep at it until I have an “Allentown PA annual snowfall totals 1964 to present” dataset to discuss, stay tuned for that, also.

 

 

January 3, 2017 – North Dakota – Bismarck snow beats records

The total accumulation of snow so far this season — or Jan. 2 — is 53.1 inches. That is the most snowfall ever accumulated to date, according to Michael Mathews, a meteorologist at National Weather Service in Bismarck.

The 1993-94 snowfall season, July 1 through Jan. 2, held the record prior and now takes second place, with 49.3 inches.

(Here you can see how they provided the old and new records, but carefully hedged by omitting the percentage increase between them, as printing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. It’s eight percent above the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. They hedge again by using the flat, neutral term “beats” to describe a near-ten-percent increase – ed)

 

March 1, 2017 – Boise’s winter weather breaks some records, falls short on others 

We ranked first in the record books for snowfall in December and January — the most ever for that two-month period. The total 35.5 inches handily surpassed the previous record of 30.5 inches in 1983-84.

(Here you see how they provided the old and new records, but carefully hedged by omitting the percentage increase, as printing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. It’s 16 percent above the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. And that’s a specific number; the article hedges instead with “handily surpassed”, which is general, and emotional, hallmarks of Propaganda. – ed)

 

April 13, 2017 – After 63 feet of snow, Northern California mountains break record for wettest water year

A mind-boggling 751 inches of snow have pummeled the Sugar Bowl ski area near Lake Tahoe this winter. It’s emblematic of a record season for precipitation in California’s northern Sierra Nevada mountain range, and the abrupt end to a historic drought.

At eight representative weather stations in the northern Sierra, the average precipitation reached 89.7 inches (combining rain and melted snow), passing the previous record of 88.5 inches set in 1982-1983.

(Here you see how they combined eight different locations, so you’d be spared from reading the most-impactful, and largest record, and also how they provided the old and new (average) records, but carefully hedged by omitting the percentage increase, as printing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. It’s 1.3 percent above the previous record. They picked “representative” weather stations, but I’ll bet you they picked the lowest eight in the data set – ed)

 

October 4, 2017 – Montana just experienced a record-breaking blizzard. Here are the photos

A record snowstorm just swept through Montana, leaving more than a foot of white stuff behind.

According to Weather.com, an early season snowstorm — also deemed the “first blizzard of the season” — fell in Montana this week, sweeping through the Rocky Mountains.

Havre, Montana, reportedly received 14.8 inches of snow Monday night — setting a new record for highest snow total in October for the area, which had hovered around 8.6 inches.

(Here you see how they provided the old and new records, but carefully hedged by omitting the percentage increase, as printing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. It’s seventy two percent above the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. “More than a foot” is used to hedge, to avoid saying “almost fifteen inches.” Records don’t “hover around” anywhere…they are exact. The use of “hover around” is bizarre – ed)

 

November 3, 2017 – Seattle hit with early November snowfall – Curbed Seattle

Still, today is especially cold. NWS predicted early Friday morning that we’ll set a record for lowest high temperature for the day. Early snow, NWS cautions, doesn’t necessarily mean an especially snowy winter.

 

December 7, 2017 – Alaska records one of the most extreme snowfall rates on record

On Wednesday, December 6, this storm dropped 12.7 cm (5 inches) of snow at Thompson Pass in 30 minutes, 25.4 cm (10 inches) in 60 minutes and 38.1 cm (15 inches) in 90 minutes. Within 72 hours (between December 3 – 6, 13:00 local time), the National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) SNOTEL site at Nicks Valley at 1 300 m (4 280 feet) picked up 210.8 cm (83 inches) of snow, making a total of 320 cm (126 inches).

 

December 9, 2017 – Philadelphia, PA – Weather delay: Snow arrives late, sets record … and stays late

Philadelphia reported an official 3.3 inches at 7 p.m., besting the previous record of 2.9 for a Dec. 9, set 75 years ago.

(The insertion of ‘arrives late‘ and ‘stays late‘ on either side of ‘sets record’ is deliberate, to chop it up, to avoid saying the more direct “snow sets record”. – ed)

 

December 10, 2017 – Brief winter wonderland: Record snow totals and what to expect next

The D.C. area felt a wave of winter weather Saturday, its first significant snowfall in December since 2013. The day’s weather even broke snowfall records in all three of the region’s airports.
Storm Team 4 Meteorologist Steve Prinzivalli said Saturday’s snowfall broke records at Dulles International Airport (4 inches), BWI Marshall Airport (2.6 inches) and Reagan National Airport (2 inches).

(This story does not say a word about what the previous records were, or the percentages of the new records over the old. The headline leads with “Brief” as a negative hedge against “record snow.” “Totals” is tacked on the end to hedge and soften yet again.   – ed)

 

December 10, 2017 – Saturday’s snowfall set records, but it was only 2.4 inches.

NPR’s Rob Byers tweeted a video of a snowplow, diligently plowing a snow-free street in Washington, D.C.

(This story does not say a word about what the previous record was, or the percentage of the new record over the old. – ed)

 

December 14, 2017 – Syracuse, N.Y. – Syracuse breaks snowfall recordand it wasn’t even the snowiest spot in CNY

Wednesday’s snowfall in Central New York was record-breaking.

At Hancock International Airport, the official measuring station for Syracuse, 8.9 inches of snow fell. The old record for Dec. 13 was 5.9 inches, set in 1951.

Syracuse wasn’t the snowiest place in Central New York, which saw waves of lake effect snow sweep through. Phoenix had 14.4 inches Wednesday, according to the weather service. Camillus had 10.5 inches.

Tug Hill got even more. Redfield, in Oswego County, had 21.4 inches on Wednesday. Since Sunday, 44.3 inches has fallen there.

(This story provides the old and new records, but carefully hedges by omitting the percentage increase, as printing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. It’s fifty one percent above the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. Uses the flat, neutral “record-breaking” as a hedge against a 51% increase. – ed)

 

December 16, 2017 – Spokane, WA – Friday’s snowfall breaks daily record at airport; streets remain icy as full-city plow continues

On Friday, 7.1 inches fell, as measured at Spokane International Airport, crushing the record of 4.8 inches set on the same date in 1963.

(This story provides the old and new records, but carefully hedges by omitting the percentage increase, as printing it would be much more impactful. So I had to do the math. It’s forty eight percent above the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. But I give them credit for using the term “crushing“, which is accurate. – ed)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *