I think our method is better ;-)

     

Kent posted this momentous piece in the Swedish orgonite blogsite:

تدمير احدى منصات HAARP في البرازيلمن الاسلحة المستعملة في تغيير المناخ

Posted by Driss Lee on Sunday, December 3, 2017

It’s a very encouraging sign, I think, that people are getting fed up with the rule of murderous parasites but a much more productive solution would have been to put some orgonite around the perimeter of that weapon platform in order to turn it all into a life force generator.

Maybe we could call a properly flipped (rather than demolished) weapon array like this one could have been an ‘orgonite footprint’ to start countering the Greenboots’ (Rockefeller brain police’s) creepy ‘carbon footprint’ miasm.

This is probably the largest scale destruction of corporate/military weaponry to date.  The one I personally know about happened in Botswana several years ago.  Young King Kgafela had refused to move into the tribal palace after the death of his father, the previous king,  because a death tower was on the property, so the townspeople promptly pulled that weapon down and then he moved in.  He later got involved with orgonite poduction and distribution.

7 thoughts on “I think our method is better ;-)

  1. Don Croft Post author

    Thanks, Carlos–accountability is our friend

    They do sort of look like transformers but I’ve never seen heavy coaxial cables coming up from underground to transformers. I’ll ask Harold, an accomplished orgonite flinger who now lives nearby and is a retired engineer who worked on transformer arrays,

    If it’s a transformer array the coax cables may be evidence that it’s also a weapon array.

    Carol and I have flipped a few arrays whose towers are all connected together at the top. The fellow who is evidently doing the toppling seems to have some insight.

    The real news, perhaps, is that a lot of people now resent weather warfare 😉

    Reply
  2. Don Croft Post author

    When I visited the Swedish site to thank Kent, the post had been removed by faCIAbook, so I posted the URL of this EW thread, there, or only attempted to.

    Reply
  3. Carlos Silva

    Right, it’s weird to see coaxials on this type of instalation.

    The story sounded too clear cut so I searched a bit more and found an article on Brazilian news about this. According to the article, a bunch of Sem-Terra (landless people) went on a rampage in a farm, which included damages to a lot more equipment. They were concerned about the removal of water from the nearby river.

    https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fg1.globo.com%2Fjornal-nacional%2Fnoticia%2F2017%2F11%2Fpolicia-investiga-invasao-de-fazenda-e-vandalismo-no-oeste-da-bahia.html&edit-text=&act=url

    Here one farmer from that area explains they were actually not Sem-Terra, they were all farmers from the region and they did it because the river was loosing water more and more every year to that mega-farm, and “no-one was doing anything”. So for them it was about survival.

    It was great to find this video because I was sure the news corporations would not give voice to those people. It’s ok, they don’t need to anymore – we have the internet 😉

    Reply
    1. Edu

      This is a common practice in Brazilian poorest region, the “Nordeste”. Big plantation owners siphon all the water resources of a place to their exportation crops, while the locals are left to perish.

      Reply
  4. Edu

    When I was in Houston in November 2014, there were local news about systematic destruction of cell towers in the rural areas. The police didn’t (want) to know their motivation, as nothing was stolen in these cases. 12 towers had been attacked so far.

    Reply

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