The folks in charge are not your friends, and are lying to you about basically everything, including internet addiction

September 5, 2014 – “Feeling a need to be socially connected hardly seems like an addiction to me,”

Ira Hyman, Ph.D., in “Psychology Today”

February 3, 2015 – Chinese teenager chops off own hand to cure internet addiction.

September 25, 2016 – A Chinese teenager tied her mother to a chair and starved her to death in revenge for sending her to an abusive internet addiction boot camp.

May 18, 2017 – Is Internet Addiction A Thing? : Shots – Health News : NPR

 

 

 

 

The set of quotes immediately above shows that the folks in charge are not your friends, and are lying to you about basically everything, including Internet addiction.

The words “mystery”, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything. One of those variants is “unsure”.

That’s why one of the news stories I’ve appended below says “researchers are still unsure why girls go online on their phones more than boys do…”

However, there are a great many things that researchers are, in fact, sure of, and I’ve appended a ton of new stories below, and distilled the research down from them:

 

 

DEPRESSION

Web-addicted individuals have a 65 percent higher rate of psychiatric morbidity.

There’s a strong correlation between internet addiction and anxiety, stress, and depression.

Long hours of mobile phone use, particularly 2 hours or more, are related to depression.

34 percent of teen girls ages 14-17 say they mostly go online using their cell phone, 10 percent higher than teen boys the same age. This is notable since boys and girls are equally likely to be smartphone owners.

Depression in teens increased 37 percent from 2005 to 2013. Three-fourths of those depressed teens were girls.

Phone addiction is 10% higher among women than among men.

Women aged 45-54 suffer more stress and depression than all other age groups

Smartphone adoption in the US strongest among older people.

 

INSOMNIA

Web-addicted individuals have a 65 percent higher rate of psychiatric morbidity.

There’s a strong correlation between Internet addiction and insomnia.

Long hours of mobile phone use, particularly five hours or more per day, are associated with insomnia.

Phone addiction is 10% higher among women than among men.

34 percent of teen girls ages 14-17 say they mostly go online using their cell phone, 10 percent higher than teen boys the same age. This is notable since boys and girls are equally likely to be smartphone owners.

(April 20, 2013 – “researchers are still unsure why girls go online on their phones more than boys do”)

Women are 41% more likely to suffer from insomnia than men.

(April 17, 2012 – Insomnia Affects Women Slightly More Than Men)

Smartphone adoption in the US strongest among older people.

The trend of female predisposition to insomnia is consistent and progressive across age, with more significance in the elderly.
ALCOHOL ABUSE

There is a significant relationship between Problematic Cell Phone Use and alcohol abuse.

Web-addicted individuals have a 65 percent higher rate of psychiatric morbidity.

New research shows an alarming rise in hard drinking and alcohol abuse, especially in women and older Americans.

Phone addiction is 10% higher among women than among men.

34 percent of teen girls ages 14-17 say they mostly go online using their cell phone, 10 percent higher than teen boys the same age. This is notable since boys and girls are equally likely to be smartphone owners.

Smartphone adoption in the US strongest among older people.

 

SUICIDE

There is a significant relationship between Problematic Cell Phone Use and suicide. The rate of suicidal ideation is 12% higher, and the rate of suicide attempts is 8% higher in adolescents with problematic CPU than those without problematic CPU.

Internet addicts have a 47 percent higher rate of suicidal thoughts within a week, a 23 percent higher rate of lifetime suicide attempts, and a 5 percent higher rate of suicides attempt within a year.

Web-addicted individuals have a 65 percent higher rate of psychiatric morbidity.

34 percent of teen girls ages 14-17 say they mostly go online using their cell phone, 10 percent higher than teen boys the same age. This is notable since boys and girls are equally likely to be smartphone owners.

Phone addiction is 10% higher among women than among men.

Smartphone adoption in the US strongest among older people.

The U.S. suicide rate has increased sharply since the turn of the century, led by an even greater rise among middle-aged white people, particularly women.

2006 – Sex differences in insomnia: a meta-analysis.

A risk ratio of 1.41 [95% confidence interval: 1.28-1.55] for female versus male was found. The female excess in the risk of insomnia in large and quality studies was much higher than that of small and nonquality studies. The trend of female predisposition was consistent and progressive across age, with more significance in the elderly.

 

 

 

April 17, 2012 – Insomnia Affects Women Slightly More Than Men

 

April 20, 2013 – 34 percent of teen girls ages 14-17 say they mostly go online using their cell phone, 10 percent higher than teen boys the same age. This is notable since boys and girls are equally likely to be smartphone owners.

Although researchers are still unsure why girls go online on their phones more than boys do, they point out that this is an important emerging trend.

 

2014 – A multiple regression analysis revealed that gender and five personality domains could significantly predict 13.5% of the scores on the Mobile Phone Problem Usage Scale [F(6,497) = 13.00, P < 0.001]. Females, high extraverts, high neurotics, and low open-minded are liable to score higher on the scale [Table 2].

 

February 2014 – Association between problematic cellular phone use and suicide

Five hundred thirty-two adolescents (10.54%) had problematic CPU. The rates of suicidal ideation were 23.50% and 11.76% in adolescents with problematic CPU and without problematic CPU, respectively. The rates of suicidal attempts in both groups were 13.70% and 5.45%, respectively.

 

April 1, 2014 – Women aged 45-54 suffer more stress and depression than all other age groups

While this may in part be explained by women feeling it is more socially acceptable to talk about how they feel than men, some of it may also result from the pressures of juggling work and caring responsibilities. Another cause of stress and physiological symptoms for many older women is the menopause.

 

April 23, 2014 – Flurry has deduced that the number of mobile addicts grew from 79 million people to 176 million people between March 2013 and March 2014 — an increase of 123%.

Mobile addicts skew female — there are approximately 15 million more women than men who fit the description

(A masterfully-gynastic cutting up of the data. If there are 176 million mobile addicts, and 15 million more women than men fit that description, then phone addiction is 10% higher among women than among men. – ed)

 

September 5, 2014 – A recent study published in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions found that female college students spend an average of 10 hours a day on their cell phones, while male students report spending nearly eight.

One note of caution: It’s important to remember that Roberts’ study shows that most people who are “addicted” to their cell phones are primarily using them as a way to stay connected to other people. In a 2013 blog post for Psychology Today, psychology professor Ira Hyman, Ph.D., writes that researchers may just be observing the rise of a new norm in social interaction: immediate, hyper-connected and here to stay.

“Feeling a need to be socially connected hardly seems like an addiction to me,” Hyman writes.

 

September 8, 2014 – Men sent the same amount of emails as women but spent less time doing so. Roberts said this indicated that men were sending “shorter, more utilitarian messages than their female counterparts.”

 

2015 – Why is depression more prevalent in women? – NCBI – NIH

 

February 3, 2015 – Chinese teenager chops off own hand to cure internet addiction.

 

October 5, 2015 – Women are known to suffer more from sleep disturbances, partly thanks to raising young children and hormonal fluctuations. But it turns out there’s also a genetic reason for exhaustion in women. A study of data on 7,500 male and female twins found that women have a higher genetic risk of developing insomnia than men.

 

December 2015 – Females were reported to score higher on the problematic mobile phone use scale (Takao et al., 2009).

 

April 22, 2016 – The U.S. suicide rate has increased sharply since the turn of the century, led by an even greater rise among middle-aged white people, particularly women.

 

May 4, 2016 – According to a 2014-15 survey in Taiwan, the prevalence rate of internet addiction among 1,100 respondents (mostly female) was 10.6 percent. The aforementioned Taiwanese study looked closely at the link between suicide and internet addiction. When comparing the internet-addicted respondents to the non-addicts, researchers found that internet addicts have:
•A 47 percent higher rate of suicidal thoughts within a week
•A 23 percent higher rate of lifetime suicide attempts
•A 5 percent higher rate of suicides attempt within a year

Unsurprisingly, the same study also found that web-addicted individuals have a 65 percent higher rate of psychiatric morbidity, which means both physical and psychological decoration due to a mental condition.

 

June 1, 2016 – Women More Prone To Smartphone Addiction Than Men: Study
September 2016 – Internet Addiction and Relationships with Insomnia, Anxiety, Depression,

Stress and Self-Esteem in University Students: A Cross-Sectional Designed Study

Heavy internet use was also reported to be associated to mood disorders [28], poor sleep quality [28, 29], low self-esteem [30], impulsivity [31], suicide [32, 33], lower levels of physical activity [29], and health problems (migraines, back pain, obesity) [34].

When examining insomnia, our results also showed that 9.8% of participants suffered from clinically significant insomnia and a strong correlation was found between potential internet addiction and insomnia.

Furthermore, a strong correlation was found in this study between potential internet addiction and anxiety, stress, and depression: the percentage of students suffering from anxiety, depression or stress is higher among potential internet addicts.
September 25, 2016 – A Chinese teenager tied her mother to a chair and starved her to death in revenge for sending her to an abusive internet addiction boot camp.

 

November 16, 2016 – A study of national trends in depression among adolescents and young adults published in the journal Pediatrics on November 14 found that the prevalence of teens who reported an MDE in the previous 12 months jumped from 8.7% in 2005 to 11.5% in 2014. That’s a 37 percent increase.
February 2017 – Association of alcohol use with problematic mobile phone use and depressive symptoms among college students in Anhui, China

We conclude that there is a significant relationship between PMPU and alcohol use, and a significant multiplicative interactive effect of PMPU and depressive symptoms with alcohol use among college students, in Anhui, China.

 

February 3, 2017 – Psychological Factors and Alcohol Use in Problematic Mobile Phone Use in the Spanish Population

Specifically, anxiety, alcohol, and impulsivity expressed through positive and negative urgency have a relevant predictive weight. Put differently, the factor analysis may help explain this result. It shows that, in abuse and dependence, positive urgency predominates, motivated by precipitation derived from positive affective states, in addition to lack of premeditation or reflection on the consequences, that is, a determined impulse to use mobile phones due to anxiety, leading to an impulsive behavior resulting from pleasant affective states in which alcohol may have an important presence.

 

February 13, 2017 – Psychiatrist Ramin Mojtabai and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health wanted to know whether rates of depression among teens had increased over the past decade. They analyzed federal data from interviews with more than 172,000 adolescents. Between 2005 and 2014, the scientists found, rates of depression went up significantly — if extrapolated to all U.S. teens it would work out to about a half million more depressed teens. What’s more, three-fourths of those depressed teens in the study were girls.

 

March 23, 2017 – Explaining The Rising Death Rate In Middle-Aged White People

 

April 7, 2017 – Poor sleep quality and suicide attempt among adults with internet addiction: A nationwide community sample of Korea

Among adults with Internet Addiction, poor sleep quality was found to be associated with more severe IA and lifetime suicide attempts.

 

June 29, 2017 – Association between Excessive Use of Mobile Phone and Insomnia and Depression among Japanese Adolescents

The present study found that long hours of mobile phone use was associated with insomnia, particularly in students using mobile phones for 5 h or more a day. Additionally, long hours spent using mobile phones for SNS or online chat was related to depression, particularly in students who spent 2 h or more on SNS and online chat.
August 11, 2017 – Study finds 1 in 8 Americans struggles with alcohol abuse – CNN

New research shows an alarming rise in hard drinking and alcohol abuse, especially in women and older Americans.

 

November 23, 2017 – Smartphone adoption in the US strongest among older people

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