Horseshoe Crabs: “”Are they declining? Are they increasing? Are they possibly becoming endangered?”

The words “mystery“, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything.

That’s why one story about horseshoe crabs, below, says “The status of horseshoe crab populations along the Atlantic coast is poorly understood“, and why another says “‘Living fossil’ crabs mysteriously dying in Japan”, and why another says “Hundreds of Horseshoe Crabs Die in Japan, Confusing Scientists”, and why another says “little is known about the population of horseshoe crabs in New Hampshire’s Great Bay Estuary.” And why yet another, from Delaware, says “Little is known about the status of the horseshoe crab population.”

Even the folks who study the subject at school are seriously confused and ensheepled:

“Kate McCarthy is studying environmental science at Westfield State University. ‘They’re ancient animals so it would be helpful to study their populations and be able to know where they stand,” she said. “Are they declining? Are they increasing? Are they possibly becoming endangered?”

You’ll see how many or most of the stories below refuse to provide data – as, when data is located, it goes badly against the thesis that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of mankind” ruse. A la an 11% increase from 2013 to 2014 in New York, and a 166% increase from 2016 to 2017.

Which maps very accurately against seven record lobster seasons in a row, up in Maine, so it’s a bit tiresome to have to even stress these points.

For those new to the party, the headlines “Living fossil’ crabs mysteriously dying in Japan”, and “Hundreds of Horseshoe Crabs Die in Japan, Confusing Scientists” are documenting a covert animal-killing op in which what we euphemistically call ‘secret agents‘ are trying to prop up the failed and wholly-fraudulent impression that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying” on behalf of the barely-closeted Death worshippers they work for.

But, despite the cloud of propaganda, the horseshoe crabs are booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in our lifetimes – just like the lobsters in Maine.

 

 

 

August 30, 2010 – Climate change implicated in decline of horseshoe crabs – Phys.org

A distinct decline in horseshoe crab numbers has occurred that … census numbers for horseshoe crabs have increased incrementally recently.

(No other data is provided in the story – ed)

 

November 7, 2014 – Horseshoe crab population on rise in Md. shore area
Maryland Coastal Bay Program’s 13th annual horseshoe crab spawning survey shows positive results for the crabs, with volunteers collecting 66 surveys from five beach breeding sites to reveal a total of 35,278 crabs.

That’s an 11 percent increase from last year, when surveyors found less than 32,000 horseshoe crabs. The data indicates an increase in horseshoe crab spawning throughout Maryland’s coastal waters since the inaugural survey in 2006 and commercial harvest restrictions are working to increase local horseshoe crab populations.

(Headline hedges with the general ‘on rise’, avoiding the specific ‘increase 11%, which would have been more impactful, and go seriously off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all – ed)

 

June 10, 2015 – It’s Spawning Season: Are Horseshoe Crabs Down For the Count?

 

March 18, 2016 – Dover, DE – Volunteers reap valuable scientific data with horseshoe crab survey

All of this makes DNREC’s Drexel Siok a very happy environmental scientist.

He is running the Horseshoe Crab Spawning Survey, the state’s annual effort to gauge the Delaware Bay’s population of these 300-million-year-old creatures, ones that still are vital to 21st century medical science and the environment.

“It all went very well,” Siok said after a May 8 midnight expedition. “We saw quite a few crabs, more than expected for this early in the year

(No other data is provided in the article – ed)

 

June 23, 2016 – The Tide Is High: Counting Horseshoe Crabs | WGBH News

There was a drop in the horseshoe crab population in Duxbury between 2008 and 2012 but Grady says it’s been increasingly stable since then.

(What kind of drop? What do you mean ‘increasingly stable’? General fog, no data – hedging, obfuscation – ed)

At Duxbury Bay, volunteer Carolyn Neaves tallies up the crab count for the noon high tide: 98 crabs altogether; 7 females.

It’s not a high spawning index but Grady says it’s a pretty good density, considering her team counted an overwhelming 1200 horseshoe crabs a couple weeks earlier, and the spawning season is tapering off.

(Huh? That’s vague, general science fog-talk, with no specifics. What is a high spawning index? What is a very good density? Hedging, obfuscation – ed)

“We’ve been seeing a lot of spawning pairs, which is always good. Duxbury tends to have a much higher spawning index than some of the other bays in the state. And we see a much better sex ratio, so we see more females to males.” Grady said.

(Pretends to be scientific, but doesn’t clarify the actual state of affairs -ed)

 

July 9, 2016 – Horseshoe crabs save lives, but their numbers are dwindling 

 

July 28, 2016 – Hilton Head, SC – Horseshoe Crab Tagging Program
The status of horseshoe crab populations along the Atlantic coast is poorly understood, but the crabs continue to be harvested. Although it is believed that horseshoe crabs are abundant, a decline in the population could severely impact shorebird populations that depend on the eggs for survival and severely impact medical uses of the crabs.

 

July 29, 2016 – New York – With the help of 163 volunteers (a record!), we were able to count spawning horseshoe crabs at four locations: Plumb Beach East, Plumb Beach West, Big Egg Marsh, and Dead Horse Bay. Spawning activity peaked during the full moon around Memorial Day this year. The high counts were 205 crabs at Plumb Beach East, 21 crabs at Plumb Beach West, and 451 crabs at Big Egg (and that was only what we counted in our quadrat samples!). At Dead Horse Bay, where we take a total count of the horseshoe crabs, the high count was 493.

 

Sep 15, 2016 – ‘Living fossil’ crabs mysteriously dying in Japan – Phys.org
September 16, 2016 – Hundreds of Horseshoe Crabs Die in Japan, Confusing Scientists …

 

May 9, 2017 – HORSESHOE CRAB MONITORING IN FULL SWING AT MYSTIC AQUARIUM

(The article provides no actual data, zero – ed)

 

May 17, 2017 – Horseshoe crabs, which pre-date dinosaurs, spawn in droves on Delaware Bay

(The article provides no actual data, zero – ed)

 

May 18, 2017 – It’s Not Easy Being a Horseshoe Crab Around New York Harbor

 

June 3, 2017 – New York, NY – Horseshoe Crabs Are Flocking To Beaches For Mating Sessions

Beachgoers up and down the East Coast have been coming across horseshoe crabs. And that’s because it’s time for the marine arthropods to mate.

Have you been noticing more horseshoe crabs than usual at your local beach?

(The article provides no actual data, zero. Signally, the ‘have you been noticing more crabs?’ line is a feeler, to see if people are waking up to the great, epochal positive changes underway at every level of our reality – ed)

 

June 14, 2017 – Boston, MA – Increasing number of horseshoe crabs means good news for our health

(increasing is general, hedges – ed)

The crab population here has been increasing, which is a good sign for the eco-system.

(increasing is general, hedges -ed)

Kate McCarthy is studying environmental science at Westfield State University.

“They’re ancient animals so it would be helpful to study their populations and be able to know where they stand,” she said. “Are they declining? Are they increasing? Are they possibly becoming endangered? It would help us figure out ways to keep their populations up, and healthy, and growing.”

(Article provides no numbers, zero, nada -ed)

 

June 29, 2017 – Maryland – Thousands of horseshoe crabs spotted spawning

(thousands is general, hedges – ed)

 

August 8, 2017 – New York – Another great horseshoe crab monitoring season has come and gone. It was quite an incredible year for horseshoe crabs in Jamaica Bay, with huge numbers of spawning horseshoe crabs at our four sites: Plumb Beach East and West, Big Egg Marsh, and Dead Horse Bay. While numbers are still preliminary, peak spawning appears to have taken place in the beginning of June. On June 11, we had 351 crabs at Plumb Beach East (in our quadrat samples), 59 at Plumb Beach West (in quadrat samples), and 1,313 at Dead Horse Bay (total count). Big Egg peaked slightly earlier, with 284 crabs in quadrat samples on May 27. While Big Egg’s numbers were down slightly from last year, overall numbers and spawning densities increased at all the other sites.

(2016’s numbers  – The high counts were 205 crabs at Plumb Beach East, 21 crabs at Plumb Beach West, and 451 crabs at Big Egg (and that was only what we counted in our quadrat samples!). At Dead Horse Bay, where we take a total count of the horseshoe crabs, the high count was 493.)

(Dead Horse Bay was 493 in 2016, and 1,313 in 2017. That’s a 166% increase, in one year. And they made me do the math. At Plum Beach West, numbers went up fro 21 to 59, year over year, a 180% increase where, again, they made me do the math. Also, at Plub Beach West, quadrat sample numbers are used, versus total count. They mix up quadrat and total numbers to confuse and muddy the picture. So Dead Horse Bay’s 166% increase is our most accurate data point, here. – ed)

 

October, 2017 – New Hampshire – University of New Hampshire – Spawning Horseshoe Crab Surveys

In spite of this interest, little is known about the population of horseshoe crabs in New Hampshire’s Great Bay Estuary. This lack of information is critical, and citizen scientists are playing a big role in filling in this missing knowledge. In 2012 and 2013, volunteers partnered with UNH researchers to survey spawning horseshoe crabs using methods that are consistent with State agency surveys. After a two-year hiatus, the project has returned for 2016 and 2017.

The 2017 horseshoe crab survey has wrapped up for the year! Stay tuned for more information about next year’s survey.

(Theres no data of any kind in the article – ed)

 

October, 2017 – Delaware – Horseshoe Crab – species – Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission

Little is known about the status of the horseshoe crab population.

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