Violent crime in Los Angeles dropped 29% over the last decade, and another 28% just last year

“All the forces in the world are not so powerful as an idea whose time has come.”

Victor Hugo

 

 

I think that quote goes to the heart of why I’m content to have this thread reside merely on an Obscure Internet Forum. You know how, when something’s time has come, it just goes “viral”? Heavier-than-air flight was coming into being all over the globe at the same time. A German immigrant in Connecticut beat the Illuminist-shill Wright Brothers to it by about three years. One of the conditions of the Wright’s plane being at the Smithsonian is an eternal, contractual non-questioning of if it was, indeed, the first.

At some point, at some moment, the great black spell that’s been laid upon humanity is going to break, and the whole construct that I elucidate here on a daily basis will collapse in a moment. It’s what was known ad nauseum in the business world a couple of decades ago as a “Paradigm Shift.”

It’s incomprehensible to me that a vast majority of the 99% of the world’s populace who don’t control the weath cannot consciously admit to themselves that the 1% who do are not their cuddly buddies, not their friends. That those one-percenters might Conspire together to advance their already-dominant position.

But such is the situation. For now!

It’s September, 2017, and crime and violence are dropping precipitously all over the globe. Since that statement directly refutes the Orthodoxy of violence that is at the base of the globe’s Media organs, I’ve appended a current news story below to support it.

True to the strict propaganda format documented in all of the other stories I’ve posted on this thread about record-low crime, this story fabricates a local plausible-deniability excuse for your subconscious to grasp onto, and studiously avoids mentioning the larger trend – that crime is dropping all over the globe, just like it is in Los Angeles.

Here’s the excuse: “top officials at the Los Angeles Police Department retooled their crime-fighting strategies. They sent extra officers to the neighborhoods hit hardest, looking for guns and focusing on gang-inspired violence.”

The article about the most peaceful summer in anyone’s memory starts with violence and negativity: “Two years ago, a particularly brutal August — the deadliest the city had seen in years — alarmed Los Angeles police.

Just as it ends with violence and negativity: “The chief, however, delivered a word of caution to the city’s Police Commission after sharing the numbers Tuesday, saying the summer ‘will be difficult to replicate.’ A reminder of that came later in the day, when a shooting in the 9800 block of South San Pedro Street left one person dead.”

But, Chief – the article clearly told us that A decade ago, there were 116 homicides during the summer. Last year, there were 82.” And this year there were 59. That’s a trendline that’s steeply downward. Did you notice that they didn’t mention the percentage drops, as printing them would be more impactful, and go seriously off-message in regard to the violence and negativity? So I had to do the math.

116 to 82 is a 29% percent drop in a decade. 82 to 59 is a 28% percent drop in one year. So you can see how the crime drop is increasing in speed and magnitude.

The next time impactful numbers show up, the same steady pattern is elucidated:

the number of people shot has dropped significantly compared with the same period in 2016. As of Sept. 2, 134 people had been shot, 20 fewer than in 2016 and about 50 fewer than the year before.”

They hedge by saying “dropped significantly“…they gave you the numbers, but carefully withheld the percentages, as printing them would be more impactful and go seriously off-message in regard to the violence and negativity. So I had to do the math.

That’s confusingly written. But I think it means shootings in Los Angeles dropped 13% last year, and 27% from 2015 to 2017.

Read both sentences:

The number of people shot has dropped significantly.

“The number of people shot has dropped 27% in two years.”

The second example is obviously much stronger.

The phenomenon of dropping crime and violence is global, and has been going on for some years, now. And the coverage of this unprecedented societal change in the globe’s wholly-controlled-and-coopted Media organs is formulaic and repetitive. Repeated by a small, tightly-networked, Conspiratorial few, who Conspire, with some great measure of success, to defraud the many.

How long do you think the same repetitive tactics are going to stop the awareness of the larger phenomena I’ve just elucidated? This isn’t particle physics we’re discussing here, it’s pretty basic stuff.

I think they’re at the end of their road, the end of the game. Remember, they call what they do a “Confidence game”, it’s a game to them. They use fair appearance and misleading words and actions to gain the confidence of a “rube” that they will later “fleece”.

Remember, when cons collapse, they do so in a rush, like a house of cards.

 

 

 

 

September 12, 2017 – L.A. saw a big drop in homicides this summer, falling to levels seen in 1966

Two years ago, a particularly brutal August — the deadliest the city had seen in years — alarmed Los Angeles police.

Hoping to slow the bloodshed, top officials at the Los Angeles Police Department retooled their crime-fighting strategies. They sent extra officers to the neighborhoods hit hardest, looking for guns and focusing on gang-inspired violence.

This summer, those changes finally paid off, Chief Charlie Beck said Tuesday.

L.A. saw a total of 59 homicides in June, July and August, Beck said — far lower than the number of killings typical for the three-month period. Other than 2014, when the city also recorded 59 homicides, it was the fewest killings in a single summer since 1966.

In recent years, the city’s summer homicide tally typically was in the 70s or 80s, according to a review of LAPD data. A decade ago, there were 116 homicides during the summer. Last year, there were 82.

Beck told reporters that 59 homicides are “far too many.” But, he added, “that’s a pretty significant accomplishment for this city to have a summer that was that safe.”

The drop in killings was welcome news for the LAPD, which has been nagged by crime numbers that began creeping upward in 2014. Though the department worked steadily to reverse the trend — most notably by adding more officers to the elite Metropolitan Division and creating a command center to more quickly respond to violence in South L.A. — the numbers were slow to move.

This year, overall serious crime is up about 1.2% compared with the same period last year. But the city has seen a marked improvement in deadly violence, Beck said.

The chief pointed to two areas he said were the LAPD’s primary focus: the number of homicides and the number of people shot. Homicides dropped by 9% so far this year compared with this time in 2016, he said. Shooting victims fell by about 7%.

The summer bloodshed in 2015 was largely fueled by gang violence in South L.A., where 50 people were shot, 15 fatally, in the last two weeks of August alone. LAPD officials met with gang intervention workers, elected officials, clergy and community members, asking for help.

Those relationships stuck and have contributed to the decrease in violence seen there today, said Deputy Chief Phil Tingirides, who heads the LAPD’s South Bureau. He credited the community’s work, especially by those who have intervened when gang activity threatens to flare.

That, he said, along with the influx of Metro officers and the use of the LAPD’s command center, have helped drive down the violence from two summers ago.

“I’ve gotten more sleep at night than I have in a lot of years,” Tingirides said.

Many of the recent homicides have been connected to domestic disputes or people who knew one another — “not the typical gang-related homicides that we saw during that 15-day period of 2015,” he said.

The change is evident in the LAPD’s 77th Street Division, which typically sees some of the department’s highest numbers of killings and shootings. Homicides so far this year are flat, but the number of people shot has dropped significantly compared with the same period in 2016. As of Sept. 2, 134 people had been shot, 20 fewer than in 2016 and about 50 fewer than the year before.

Beck was quick to include gang intervention work and an increased number of domestic violence response teams with helping drive down violence. But, he acknowledged, “policing has a lot do to with it.”

The chief, however, delivered a word of caution to the city’s Police Commission after sharing the numbers Tuesday, saying the summer “will be difficult to replicate.”

A reminder of that came later in the day, when a shooting in the 9800 block of South San Pedro Street left one person dead.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *