Booming, burgeoning aquatic life, across the globe

It’s September, 2017, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime. Since that statement directly refutes our State Religion, which holds that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind“, I’ve appended numerous recent examples below to support it.

It’s an epochal transformation, and it began in earnest just over three years ago. This thread has documented it from the beginning.

A transformation that leads to the reality of sentences that read “Fish managers couldn’t believe their eyes when they scanned the fish count numbers from Bonneville Dam this morning.

I had to call the COE fish count hotline message to confirm 497,738 shad were counted at Bonneville Dam yesterday,” said Joe Hymer, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife salmon specialist in Vancouver. “It confirmed the count.

In an article below we read that one of the things driving that huge increase in fish is “Most of the fish have summered over in the river, due to the favorable cold water conditions over the past couple of years.”

Wait, what? I thought the last two years were the hottest in the recorded history of the planet? To maintain current programming levels, narrow eyes and bitterly affirm “yeah, but that’s there.

This thread has also documented formulaic, repetitive propaganda put in place in an attempt to slow and forestall the spread of this amazing news among a populace programmed to reject it outright.

It’s careful, it’s consistent: the story below about this year’s Great Hudson River fish count is extremely instructive as it regards the art and science of propaganda.

It starts you off by saying “The results also show the year-to-year variability in the numbers and distribution of fish.” That’s a heavy implication that the numbers just move around willy-nilly, vs. in a steady, quantum projection upward, as indicated in the numbers they positioned after that initial queasy, “don’t know what to think!” defensive hedge.

“In 2015, 1,175 Atlantic silversides were counted, including 20 netted at Little Stony Point in Cold Spring – some 55 miles north of New York Harbor. In 2014, only 50 silversides were caught, only as far upriver as Sleepy Hollow, just north of the Tappan Zee Bridge. Even fewer were netted in 2013 – 5, all caught at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Over the fish count’s six years, participants have found 65 varieties of fish. The record number of individuals counted was 2,994 in 2015.”

Can you see how it won’t give you the percentage increases, as doing so would be more impactful, and go seriously off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all? So I had to do the math.

The silverside count in the Hudson river increased 300% from 2013 to 2014. Then the count increased 2,250 percent from 2014 to 2015. They won’t give me 2016. The 2017 count is down 41% since 2015.

An internet search for the silverside count in 2016 yields this: “NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Missing Page.”

The dropping of that page is called “harrying the opposition.” Cutting the subject up like that to obfuscate such a larger trend is called “compartmentalization.”

I found a separate story with a fish total for 2016, but no silverside data. In any case, someone who actually cared about fish could find that out pretty quick, and the point has been made that the trendline is obviously up strongly, drastically.

And then they bury this in its own, completely different paragraph, lower down than the first:

The species count reached a new high – 48 kinds of fish were found, while the count of individual fish totaled 1,325.”

They saved “species count reached a new high” for after the hemming and hawing about “year to year variability in the numbers and distribution of fish.” And they watered down “reached a new record” with “reached a new high.” That’s called “spin“.

It’s clear to see the rivers, the oceans coming back to life. And what is driving it is the reduction in the larger environment of what Wilhelm Reich called “Dead Orgone Radiation”, and the increase of what he called “Positive Orgone Radiation”…those changes driven by the slow, steady, widespread and ever-increasing distribution of simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices in that larger environment.

 

 

 

August 12 – 18, 2016 – Hudson River Almanac

The Great Hudson River Fish Count found 2,177 fish of 45 species at 19 sites ranging from the junction of the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers at Peebles Island in Waterford to Valentino Pier in Brooklyn, with the Statue of Liberty in sight.

 

January 29, 2017 – Mokelumne River Hatchery Sees Record Steelhead Run

A record run of adult steelhead, 707 so far, has returned to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Mokelumne River Fish Hatchery this year, but most of these fish appear to be fish that stayed in the river than going to sea.

“Ninety percent of the fish are adult steelhead in the 18 to 22 inch range averaging 3 pounds each,” said William Smith, hatchery manager. “Most of the fish have summered over in the river, due to the favorable cold water conditions over the past couple of years. We’ve also seen a few larger fish in the 5 to 6 lb. range that have apparently been to the ocean.”

While the flows haven’t been high in the river over the past couple of years, as they are now, the water temperatures have been favorable, due to the EMBUD’s management of cold water releases from Lake Pardee into Lake Camanche in recent years. “

(They forgot how to release cold water, previously, then remembered two years ago – ed)

“Regardless of whether these fish have been to the ocean or not, any of the offspring of these fish have the potential to go to sea,” noted Smith.

The numbers of steelhead returning to the Mokelumne River Fish Hatchery don’t compare to those at Nimbus, Feather and Coleman fish hatcheries in good years, where the fish number in the thousands, but they are a vast improvement over many years when no adult steelhead returned to the facility.

(Italicized negative hedge precedes bolded positive news – ed)

No steelhead came back to the hatchery, located on the river right below Camanche Dam, for 10 years from 1976 through 1986. Again in 1998-1999, no adult steelhead returned to the facility.

(Italicized negative hedge on the back end of the bolded positive news – ed)

 

April 6, 2017 – Pennsylvania – West Point Blue Cat Record Broken

Jake Saunders broke the previous blue cat record by 9 pounds with his catch.
Jake Saunders, of Bowdon, broke the West Point blue catfish record by 9 pounds with his 29.57-lb. catch.

(That’s 43% larger than the previous record. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. The article deliberately omitted the percentage, as printing it would have been more impactful, and gone seriously off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all. So I had to do the math. -ed)

 

June 7, 2017 – India’s seafood exports at record high, up 23% – The Financial Express

 

June 20, 2017 – Columbia River shad run explodes in near-record burst over Bonneville Dam

FISHING — Holy shad! Fish managers couldn’t believe their eyes when they scanned the fish count numbers from Bonneville Dam this morning.

“I had to call the COE fish count hotline message to confirm 497,738 shad were counted at Bonneville Dam yesterday,” said Joe Hymer, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife salmon specialist in Vancouver. “It confirmed the count.”

The June 19, 2017, count was the third-largest largest on record since at least 1946, he said. “The highest daily counts were June 5 and 6, 2003, when 504,724 and 520,664 fish were tallied, respectively.

“More shad were counted Monday in a single day than the total annual counts in all but three years from 1946-1977.”

The total shad run over Bonneville Dam so far is 1,164,998.

 

July 18, 2017 – Ecuador shrimp exports at ‘record’ levels in 2017

(The parentheses hedge, question – ed)

 

August 5, 2017 – The Great Hudson River Fish Count

The results also show the year-to-year variability in the numbers and distribution of fish. In 2015, 1,175 Atlantic silversides were counted, including 20 netted at Little Stony Point in Cold Spring – some 55 miles north of New York Harbor. In 2014, only 50 silversides were caught, only as far upriver as Sleepy Hollow, just north of the Tappan Zee Bridge. Even fewer were netted in 2013 – 5, all caught at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Over the fish count’s six years, participants have found 65 varieties of fish. The record number of individuals counted was 2,994 in 2015.

August 5, 2017 The sixth annual Great Hudson River Estuary Fish Count took place at 18 sites on Saturday, August 5, 2017. The species count reached a new high – 48 kinds of fish were found, while the count of individual fish totaled 1,325. The most commonly caught fish was the striped bass – 479 of them. Almost all were young fish born this past spring in the freshwater Hudson. Striped bass were also the most widely distributed fish, found at 13 sites ranging from Valentino Pier in Red Hook, Brooklyn, to Coxsackie in Greene County. Among the oddities found were a feather blenny at Pier 25 in Hudson River Park, Manhattan, and a bowfin at Peebles Island State Park in Waterford. A large and very orange goldfish brought a smile to the faces of participants at Peebles Island, as did an odd-looking flatfish called a hogchoker, netted at Kingston Point. For more details, download the 2017 Great Hudson River Fish Count results [PDF, 49KB] . The table below lists the location, times, and leaders of fish count programs that took place on that day.

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