Breeding pairs of Common Loons in Vermont have increased 56% in ten years.

It’s September, 2017, and Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime. Since that statement directly refutes our State Religion, which holds that “Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind”, I’ve appended two recent news accounts below to support it.

In the first story, headlined “Count sets new records while gathering data on world’s birds“, the hedging start in the headline itself with the fact that they put “bird” at the end of the sentence, to avoid having to say “bird count sets new records.” In the article, the “increased awareness” canard is tirelessly played, leading with and closing with that inference, and referring to the dramatic increase in species counted a “spike” to imply that numbers have shot up, but will plunge right back down again, forming a “spike” on the graph.

In the “Positive Changes” thread from the old forum, to the discomfiture of the Coincidence Theorist, there’s a “spike” compilation post, where you can read dozens of examples of the tactic, within specific genres.

You’ll notice in the article below that that they carefully withhold the percentage of the increase, as presenting it would be more impactful, and go seriously off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all, so they hedged by omitting it. So I had to do the math. That’s a 4% increase in species sightings, in one year.

The next story, below it, is headlined “A Record Year for Vermont’s Loons in 2017.”

Ten years ago, there were 62 loon pairs in Vermont. Last year, there were 93 pairs, the most ever in history. This year, there are 97 pairs, the most ever, in history.

You’ll notice that they carefully withheld the percentage of the increase, as presenting it would be more impactful, and go seriously off-message re: Poor Mother Gaia dying, and all, so they hedged by omitting it. So I had to do the math. The number of breeding pairs of Common Loons in Vermont has increased 56% in the last ten years.

As the levels of what Wilhelm Reich called Dead Orgone Radiation drop in the larger environment, and the levels of what he called Positive Orgone Radiation rise, we’re seeing Nature come back to life, seeing it revive in formerly “dead” areas:

“the first chicks on Curtis and Dog ponds and Green River Reservoir at Merganser inlet…Buck, Echo (Charleston), and May all had chicks for the first time in many years.”

So, what’s driving it – this great revival of life – from the perspective of the article? The story allows “It was a wet year”, but spins that directly to nest-ruining…and makes no mention of what is driving it. Remember, these are Loon lovers extraordinaire, the crème de la crème of Loon enthusiasts. The omission is a tell.

And why no mention of burgeoning bird populations across the globe, if they’re such bird-loving people? The omission is a tell.

Can you see how I’m not running out of material, and how their tactics are not changing, at all, but are, rather, formulaic and repetitive?

Remember, when cons, or “Confidence Games” collapse, they do so in a rush, like a house of cards.

Spread the word, press the advantage, this is our time.

 

 

 

March 18, 2017 – Count sets new records while gathering data on world’s birds

The 2017 Great Backyard Bird Count is now part of the history books, and thanks to participants from around the world, this year’s GBBC ranked as the biggest count in its 20-year history. Participants set a new high bar for number of checklists submitted and total number of species reported.

An estimated 214,018 participants took part this year, compared to the 2016 final total estimate of 163,763 individuals. An incredible total of 5,940 different species was tallied by GBBC participants, which is a dramatic spike from last year’s total of 5,689 species. That record number of participants also turned in a record number of completed checklists — 173,826, compared to the final total of 162,052 in 2016.

 

August 31, 2017 – A Record Year for Vermont’s Loons in 2017

This year was another very good breeding season for Common Loons in Vermont. We found a record 97 nest attempts with at least 72 of them successful fledging young. Many loon pairs produced two chicks resulting in over 110 successfully fledging. We won’t know final numbers of chicks until we finish conducting one last survey of each successful pair, but typically about 70-80 percent of the chicks survive to late August. We still need to hike into Wallingford Pond to determine the outcome of the birds that were still incubating on LoonWatch day, July 15. For perspective, just a decade ago only 62 loon pairs nested, climbing steadily to 93 nesting pairs last year.

NESTING HIGHLIGHTS – EARLY AND LATE BIRDS

It was a wet year with at least 10 flooded nests. Several of these pairs re-nested successfully. We also observed several late hatches with over 10 occurring July 15 or later, including one that hatched on approximately August 4 on the Green River Reservoir at Merganser inlet. This late nest was not a re-nest, which is often the cause of late nests. We also had several early nesters that had chicks by June 15, including: Eden, Chittenden – east, Caspian, Dog, Fosters, Great Hosmer – south, Lower Symes, and South – Marlboro.

CHICK HIGHLIGHTS – FIRST RECORDS

There were several ‘firsts’ recorded this year including the first chicks on Curtis and Dog ponds and Green River Reservoir at Merganser inlet.  Buck, Echo (Charleston), and May all had chicks for the first time in many years. And some pairs struggle to find success on Great Averill, Little Averill, Fairfield and Iroquois, where nest failures have continued to occur. The four pairs on Little Averill and Great Averill have produced one chick in the past three years, while on nearby Norton Pond, the three pairs there have produced 9 chicks since 2015.

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