Decline in Global Alcohol Consumption Accelerating – Teen Binge Drinking Dropping

It’s September, 2017, and great, epochal positive changes are underway at every level of our reality. And those changes are increasing in speed and magnitude.

That’s why the first article I’ve appended below is headlined “Decline in Global Alcohol Consumption Accelerating.”

The second story below says “The world appears to have passed peak booze. The volume of alcoholic drinks consumed globally fell by 1.4% in 2016, to 250bn litres, according to IWSR, a research firm. It is the second consecutive year of decline, and only the third since data started to be collected in 1994.”

They say “appears” in  a desperate attempt to hedge, to defray. This thread features the last three calendar years. Please note that alcohol consumption has dropped for the last two years, back to back.

The wholly-controlled-and-coopted Media establishment is caught out obfuscating just that, here:

“The IWSR noted that this decline was accelerating at a “faster rate than has been previously reported by other data companies”, including Euromonitor, which last month said the rate of decline had actually slowed to -0.2%, from -0.8% the previous year.”

In the stories below, if you want the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Media establishment’s take on What To Think about why consumption is dropping, around the globe, they’ll first tell you that having more money makes people drink less:

Beer-drinking patterns also change as countries grow richer.”

And then they’ll tell you that having less money makes people drink less:

The overall decline is almost entirely because of downturns in three of the five biggest markets.”

That’s because Doublethink is the acceptance of or mental capacity to accept contrary opinions or beliefs at the same time, especially as a result of political indoctrination.

You’ll notice that, when we get to the story on dropping binge drinking among teens in the U.S., the Illuminist talking-head shill quoted in the article doesn’t mention anything about economics;

Maybe some policy or some other intervention or prevention has worked,” Dr. Jang said.

The words “mystery“, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly controlled and coopted Political, Academica, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything. One of those variants is “unsure”.

That’s why the brilliant and globally-knowledgeable Dr. Jang soldiers on to say  “The overall declines in frequent binge drinking indicate that national and state-level policies and programs targeted at underage drinking may have been effective, although I’m not sure to what extent each of the policies specifically contributes to the declines,”

You’ll also notice that he doesn’t mention anything about all the adults around the globe who are drinking less.

And, because the first rule of politics is “deny, deny, deny”, another quoted talking-head shill in the third article says binge drinking among teens isn’t dropping, it’s just they’re lying more effectively:

Many of the teens I care for are not measuring alcohol as we would,” Dr. Hadland said. “They’ll tell me oh, just one or two drinks, but if you drill down you realize each of those may have four or five ounces of hard liquor.”

Say what you will about these guys, there’s no quit in them.

How long do you think threadbare plausible-deniability excuses are going to keep everyone’s eyes off the larger picture I’m describing?

Not very long, I don’t think.

 

 

 

 

June 1, 2017 – DECLINE IN GLOBAL ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION ACCELERATING

The rate of decline in global alcohol consumption is accelerating, according to the IWSR, with the global market for alcoholic drinks shrinking by 1.3% in 2016, compared with an average rate of 0.3% in the previous five years.

The overal global drinks market shrunk by 1.3% in 2016, according to the IWSR.

The IWSR noted that this decline was accelerating at a “faster rate than has been previously reported by other data companies”, including Euromonitor, which last month said the rate of decline had actually slowed to -0.2%, from -0.8% the previous year.

By category, consumption of still wine dropped by 0.5% in 2016, according to the IWST, while the sparkling wine market grew 1.8%, driven by Prosecco.

Cider declined by -1.5% after years of solid growth, with this reversal blamed on declines in consumption in the South African and particularly the US, where volumes dropped by 15.2% in 2016 after years of double-digit growth, dragging down the category as a whole.

 

July 13, 2017 – Around the world, beer consumption is falling

Beer has become less popular in the world’s biggest markets

The world appears to have passed peak booze. The volume of alcoholic drinks consumed globally fell by 1.4% in 2016, to 250bn litres, according to IWSR, a research firm. It is the second consecutive year of decline, and only the third since data started to be collected in 1994. The drop-off is caused by people drinking less beer, which accounts for three-quarters of all alcohol drunk by volume. Worldwide beer consumption shrank by 1.8% to 185bn litres last year. Yet because the drinking-age population of the world grew by 1% in that time, beer consumption per drinking-age adult declined even more, by 3.2%. The overall decline is almost entirely because of downturns in three of the five biggest markets. China, Brazil and Russia accounted for 99.6% of the global decrease in the volume of beer drunk in 2016.

Both economics and changing tastes play a part. China overtook America to become the world’s biggest market for beer by volume in 2001. It now quaffs a quarter of all beer. But consumption per person peaked in 2013 and dropped further last year. One reason is that Chinese drinkers are turning away from cheap local brews towards premium products and imported beers. Beer’s appeal is also waning among older drinkers. Over-30s are moving to wine and over-40s favour baijiu, the national spirit. Elsewhere, recessions have hit beer-drinkers’ pockets. In both Brazil and Russia, consumption by the average adult fell by 7%.

Beer-drinking patterns also change as countries grow richer. In a study in 2016, Liesbeth Colen and Johan Swinnen of the University of Leuven examined the effects of income growth and globalisation on beer consumption in 80 countries between 1961 and 2009. They found that as GDP per person increased in poorer countries, beer became more popular. But when it reached around $27,000 per person, consumption began to fall again, probably as people became more aware of the dangers alcohol poses to health. Consumers may also start to opt for more expensive drinks, such as wine, once they can afford them. And beer consumption rises as countries become more globalised, the authors found. When international drinks companies move in, punters may find a new favourite tipple.

For decades, consumers in emerging markets have driven beer sales ever upwards. The latest figures suggest that the froth is coming off.

 

July 31, 2017 – Binge Drinking Drops Among Teenagers

American adolescents are binge drinking less than they used to, according to a new report.

“It’s good news,” said Bohyun Joy Jang, a researcher at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, and the first author of a study that appeared in the May issue of the journal Pediatrics. The bad news, Dr. Jang said, is that frequent binge drinking is not decreasing as rapidly among members of lower socioeconomic groups, African-Americans and girls.

The study showed that “frequent binge drinking” — at least two occasions of drinking five or more drinks in a row over the past two weeks — decreased among American adolescents over the period from 1991 to 2015. The study found, however, that drinking rates are decreasing faster among the economically better-off, and among boys.

Maybe some policy or some other intervention or prevention has worked,” Dr. Jang said. But it is “not equally effective across all these populations.” The study was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

The kinds of policies that are aimed at reducing underage alcohol consumption include stronger laws about ID checks, minimum ages for alcohol sellers, servers and bartenders, and keg registration requirements. And of course, there have been numerous efforts made to educate adolescents about the risks of heavy alcohol use.

Dr. Jang said that adolescent drinking and binge drinking have been decreasing since the early 2000s, but that this study shows a decrease specifically in the pattern of frequent binge drinking.

“The overall declines in frequent binge drinking indicate that national and state-level policies and programs targeted at underage drinking may have been effective, although I’m not sure to what extent each of the policies specifically contributes to the declines,” Dr. Jang said.

The differential effects on different populations, however, are worrying. “One of the crucial messages from our study is that the public efforts may not be reaching all adolescents equally,” Dr. Jang said. So the researchers would like to see more attention — from parents, from health care providers and from researchers — to the populations that are not being reached as successfully: black adolescents, young women and people from lower socioeconomic backgrounds.

“I think this is a real public health success that hasn’t actually been really celebrated,” said Dr. Scott Hadland, a pediatrician and adolescent addiction specialist at the Grayken Center for Addiction Medicine at Boston Medical Center, who was a co-author of a commentary on the study. And it’s not just alcohol use that has declined. “Rates of teen use and, for most substances, rates of teen heavy use have declined,” he said, steadily since about the 1990s. The exception, he said, is marijuana; daily use and near-daily use of that drug have increased, while perceptions of harm have decreased.

In the late ’90s, he said, about one in two high school seniors reported having used alcohol in the last 30 days, whereas in 2016, it was down to one in three.

Binge drinking, he said, has declined notably among all age groups. “More teens than ever are expressing disapproval around binge drinking, fewer teens than ever are reporting that alcohol is readily available, easy to get,” he said. But he agreed with other experts’ concerns about the ways that the improvements were more significant in some groups than in others. “The public health successes are not being equally shared by everybody.”

This is one of the first papers to really look carefully at drinking in this kind of detail, he said. And it’s important, even while we celebrate the public health success we think is connected to effective messaging and good preventive care, to think about whether there are adolescents cut off from the potential benefits of anti-drinking programs.

“Not all youth have the same access to high quality care and to high-quality screening and referral services,” Dr. Hadland said. “We need to think about whether our school systems have equal access to high-quality preventive messaging, whether our schools are managing this problem equally and across the board for all youth.”

 

How can parents best help their teenagers navigate this issue and keep an eye out for trouble?

“I’m also a parent, and I have been asked a lot of those kinds of questions by my friends and my co-workers,” Dr. Jang said. She pointed to the important role of screening at health care visits.

“We have to talk with the practitioners at the regular checkup because there are these short checkup guidelines so practitioners can see whether the child has any problems or not,” she said. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism publishes a guide for practitioners on how to screen young people relatively quickly for alcohol problems and intervene when necessary.

Dr. Hadland acknowledged that parents can feel that they are being asked to give contradictory messages.

“What I say to teens and what I recommend that parents reinforce with teens,” he said, “is first and foremost, for your health it’s best not to drink or to use any substances. We have data underlying that.” But then there has to be a second message, particularly for young people who are drinking: “I say, for your health, I recommend that you reduce the amount that you drink and you drink less often to reduce the harms of drinking.”

In addition, of course, there are other essential messages about how to take care of yourself if you are drinking, especially regarding safe rides home, protected sex practices and mental health.

“I do think it is really important in these conversations with teens to help reset their understanding of what is excessive drinking,” he said. Adolescents may not be measuring their alcohol intake by the same standards as researchers.

“Many of the teens I care for are not measuring alcohol as we would,” Dr. Hadland said. “They’ll tell me oh, just one or two drinks, but if you drill down you realize each of those may have four or five ounces of hard liquor.” Researchers define a drink as containing 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine or one-and-a-half ounces of hard liquor.

Dr. Hadland also uses hist conversations with young patients to talk about the consequences of heavy drinking. The top three causes of death in adolescence are motor vehicle crashes, homicide and suicide, and he said alcohol can be a contributing factor in all three.

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